Jun 16, 2019  
Course Catalog 2018-2019 
    
Course Catalog 2018-2019 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

College and Conservatory Courses (2018-19 and planned future offerings)


 You may wish to consult information about using the Oberlin Catalog located here: Using the Online Catalog to My Advantage  

 
  
  •  

    FYSP 114 - Know Your Place: Civic Humanism and Community Engagement


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, WINT

    This introduction to the history, methods, and ethics of working reciprocally within communities emphasizes the humanities as a vehicle for active citizenship. Through experiential and reflective learning about local community-based initiatives focused on issues such as poverty and environmental challenges, students will situate these efforts in historical, national, and global contexts. The course is taught in connection with a community-based learning course at Lingnan University, Hong Kong. Students in this course will be given priority consideration to participate in a winter trip to Hong Kong to engage directly with the projects they will study comparatively during the fall semester. Field trips required.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: T. Boster

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 117 - Nature and the Environment in East Asian Culture


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WINT

    This course focuses on concepts of nature, and the interaction of society and the environment in Japan, China, and Korea. How are East Asian concepts of nature influenced by Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and traditional aesthetics? Are these notions relevant to society’s relation to nature in the modern, industrialized nation state, and to environmentalism and sustainability? We will work with film, literature, architecture, and the visual arts to explore these issues.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: A. Sherif

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    East Asian Studies


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 121 - Everyday Evolution


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, WINT

    Dobzhansky’s famous quote, “Nothing in biology makes sense, except in the light of evolution,” suggests that organic evolution is widely appreciated and understood. However, many think evolution happened only long ago, and others think evolution is simply “survival of the fittest.” Using non-technical books, such as Why We Get Sick and The Botany of Desire, we will explore the complexities of evolution as central to everyday natural processes.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: R. Laushman

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 125 - Writing Place and Identity


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, WINT

    This course will invite you to critically analyze the intersection of place and identity so that you can develop a nuanced understanding of Oberlin and its impact on you. We will engage with texts in which narrative nonfiction writers and scholars find themselves grappling with the challenges of understanding a new place and, in closely analyzing their surroundings, find themselves reflecting on their conceptions of themselves. For example, in ‘Getting Away from Already Being Pretty Much Away from It All,’ David Foster Wallace negotiates feeling like an outsider at the Illinois State Fair, even though he grew up in Illinois.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: H. Sundt

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 130 - Seeing War and Peace through Religious Traditions


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, WINT

    While recourse to war seems inevitable, religious traditions have sought to define criteria that limit warfare or have created space for commitments to political nonviolence. In this course, we will explore the sources of just war and pacifist positions in Christianity, Islam, and Judaism as well as current religious and secular arguments for these positions. Throughout the course, we will also analyze several films that bring to life the realities of war and conditions that often lead to war or nonviolent resistance. Film viewing is required.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: J. Babyak

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 137 - Literacy and Literacies


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, WINT

    What counts as literacy? Do reading and writing automatically transform individual minds and broader social structures? This class addresses such questions through anthropological case studies focusing on texts drawn from a wide range of geographical, cultural, and historical settings. In so doing, we will show that the nature and effects of literacies cannot be understood separately from the broader contexts in which they are embedded. Field trip(s) required.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: E. Hoffmann-Dilloway

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 142 - Well-being


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR, WINT

    “Create all the happiness you are able to create: remove all the misery you are able to remove,” wrote Jeremy Bentham in 1830; only now, however, are the ingredients of happiness and misery coming into view for scholars and policy-makers. Exploring well-being and misery through the lenses of biology and psychology, as well as art, economics, and literature, this seminar studies the determinants of happiness and a life of meaning, the bodily ways stress and conflict threaten well-being, and effective strategies by individuals, work-places, and governments to improve well-being.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: T. Allen

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 146 - Pilgrimage in Global History


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, WINT

    Pilgrims and pilgrimage are central to many cultures. Whether Mecca for Muslims or Graceland for Elvis fans, followers of numerous faiths and cults have long hazarded desert brigands or dingy motels to reach chosen sites of devotion. This course follows their footsteps. Through the theme of pilgrimage, we examine some broader historical processes and networks that have made up our contemporary world, from religious politics to global tourism. We read first-person pilgrim accounts, fictions on votive cultures, and scholarly enquiries into the history and anthropology of pilgrimage to grasp the social, economic, political, and personal implications of ritual mobility.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: R. Choudhury

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Comparative American Studies, Gender Sexuality and Feminist Studies


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 149 - International and Domestic Non-profits and Democratic Movements


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, WINT

    Not-for-profit organizations in civil society political advocacy organizations; service delivery organizations for health care/land preservation/or education; human rights groups; labor unions; sports and religious clubs) exist in a contested arena, not in the capitalist market or in state government. Yet it is argued that such organizations are crucial to establishing honest and effective state and market activities. This course explores the explosion of both domestic and international organizations that operate in civil society and the consequences of such an explosion for citizens, markets, and their governments. We will draw upon research from U.S. academics, international scholars, and from non-profit practitioners.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: E. Sandberg

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 152 - So You Want to be an Intellectual? A Roadmap to the Republic of Letters


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, WINT

    Speaking truth to power: it is what public intellectuals do. But when, where, and how? Through what tools, skills, and venues? This course has three goals: to think about the role of the public intellectual today in light of its historical evolution; to become thoroughly familiar with the international republic of letters, where intellectuals communicate with each other and reach a general audience, and to begin thinking of ourselves as prospective citizens of that republic.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: S. Faber

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 153 - Worldview and History: Approaches to the History of the World


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, WINT

    This course critically examines approaches to world history and narratives of the rise of the West, European expansion, the discovery of the New World, and the like. What unexamined metageographical conceptions are implicated in Eurocentric assumptions about world historical developments? Readings include critical works suggesting new approaches, so that we may develop a critical perspective on material and cultural exchange and diffusion from a global perspective. Shows how ‘globalization’ has been a relevant term for over 500 years.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: D. Kelley

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 154 - Freud’s Vienna: Artists, Intellectuals, and Anti-Semites at the Fin de Siecle


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, WINT

    The Vienna where Freud penned the founding texts of psychoanalysis was the site of unprecedented intellectual and cultural ferment. It was also the birthplace of modern anti-Semitism and the home of the dictator who would destroy much of Europe: Adolf Hitler. How do we connect this political turmoil and intellectual and artistic creativity? In this class, we will explore the politics, culture, and intellectual life of this extraordinary city at this extraordinary moment in history.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: A. Sammartino

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies; History


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 162 - Cold War in Asia


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WINT

    The collapse of the Soviet Union brought the Cold War to an abrupt end. This course investigates the cultural, social, and political history of the Cold War in Asia. While we will be examining the ideological and security dimensions of U.S.-Soviet relations in detail, the emphasis will also be to explore the political, economic and ideological impact of the Cold War on Asian societies, with a particular focus on China, Japan, and the two Koreas.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: S. Jager

    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    East Asian Studies


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 182 - The Body in Health and Disease


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, WINT

    Examining the structure and function of the human body in health and disease, this seminar asks whether a universal conception of the body exists. Discussion and readings consider contrasts between females and males, as well as between perceptions of the body in Western and Chinese medicine. Topics range from the major organ systems to mental health and the biology of love and satiety. Instruction includes Cambridge-Oxford-style tutorials, meeting once a week at times to be arranged.

    Enrollment Limit: 14
    Instructor: T. Allen

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: FIX


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 185 - The Blues Detective: Riffing on a Literary Formula


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WINT

    Many writers have found the detective story to be a great genre in which to explore crime and moral ambiguity. This course examines theories about the genre and the African American cultural practice of riffing or ‘signifying’ on known formulas. Reading various works, we will discuss why black writers might have turned to a genre considered mere entertainment, features of the social world they represent, and effects on readers of their riffing on established conventions. Enrollment Limit: 14.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: G. Johns

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 196 - Women and War in the Middle East


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Courses
    Credits: 4 Credits
    Attribute: 4HU, WINT

    Women in the Middle East have addressed war and conflict in writing, art, and film both as participants and from the “home front.” Through materials ranging from poetry and prose to visual art and film, we will examine the ways women writers and artists from Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, and Syria craft, rethink, and re-examine narratives of war. We will focus on the strategies these women use to narrate and represent war, the roles they assume during times of conflict, and the ways war influences discourses of gender.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: A. Al-Raba’a

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    FYSP 199 - Designer Babies and Other Possibilities


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, WINT

    The advent and sustained proliferation of techniques in molecular biology and biotechnology have generated unprecedented possibilities for genetically manipulating not only cells, but entire organisms. As a result, what used to be solely within the confines of science fiction are, today, possibilities?realities, even!?with exciting but sometimes troubling implications. This seminar explores biotechnological advances as they apply to medicine and agriculture and will concentrate on cloning and genetic manipulation of animals and plants.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: Y. Cruz

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 019 - Parks and the Environment in Sichuan, China


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Module
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2NS

    This course draws from multiple disciplinary perspectives including geology, religious studies, sociology, and environmental studies to prepare students to engage responsively, critically, and comparatively with park and natural resource management, environmental tourism, local culture and environmental ethics in Sichuan Province, China. Readings and discussions will focus on establishing key contexts of environmental issues and understanding methodologies for engaging ethically and responsibly with local communities. Required for participants in WT2019 LIASE Study Trip to Sichuan, China.

    Enrollment Limit: 8
    Instructor: A. Schmidt

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 113 - Ice Age Ecology


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS

    The ice ages conjure images of vast glaciers, woolly mammoths, and saber-toothed cats. Have you ever wondered what happened to those giant beasts of yesteryear? This class will investigate life in ice ages in the context of changing landscapes, climate, fantastic organisms, and our own human impacts on ecosystems. Ohio is a state molded by a glacial past, and many of our local fossils are from giant ice age beasts. Learn about campus 25,000+ years ago, as well as different ice age ecosystems around the world. 
    Field trip(s) required. 

    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Instructor: W. McLaughlin


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 120 - Earth’s Environments


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR

    A survey of Earth’s internal and external features, emphasizing the unifying theory of plate tectonics as well as the study of geologic hazards and Earth resources. Labs and field trips explore Earth materials. local field sites, landforms, and interactions between humans and Earth’s surface. The course is intended for both non-majors and prospective geology majors. All students must enroll in the lecture section plus one lab section in the same semester. Field trip(s) are required.

    Enrollment Limit: 23
    Instructor: R. Eveleth, F. Page, S. Wojtal, A. Schmidt, Staff

    Prerequisites & Notes: No prerequisites, but high-school chemistry recommended.
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Environmental Studies


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 152 - Soils and Society


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR

    Soils are the basis for the formation of our societies - we need soil to grow crops and to have land for our animals to graze. However, our activities greatly alter the soils that we rely on, reducing our ability to productively use the land we live on. Through the use of case studies from regions around the world, students will learn the basics of soil science, hillslope geomorphology, and anthropogenic effects on these systems.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: A. Schmidt


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 199F - Ind Study in Geology-Full


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS

    An opportunity for students to pursue a geological interest not covered by formal courses. Students must consult with a member of the department before registering.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: D. Hubbard, K. Hubbard, F. Page, A. Schmidt, Staff, S. Wojtal, R. Eveleth

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 199H - Ind Study in Geology-Half


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2NS

    An opportunity for students to pursue a geological interest not covered by formal courses. Students must consult with a member of the department before registering.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: R. Eveleth, D. Hubbard, K. Hubbard, F. Page, A. Schmidt, S. Wojtal

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 201 - Mineralogy & Optical Crystallography


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR

    Most of our planet is made of minerals, the physical properties of which play important roles in geologic processes from the plate-tectonic to the nano- scales. This course examines the relationships between the structure, chemistry, physical and optical properties of minerals, their occurrence, and their relevance to the various branches of earth science. We will explore these concepts through laboratory exercises on crystal morphology and symmetry, optical mineralogy, x-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. Field trip(s) required.

    Enrollment Limit: 17
    Instructor: F. Page

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Geology 120.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 204 - Evolution of the Earth


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR

    This course examines major events and processes of Earth history, including the growth of continents, mountain belts and ocean basins, terrane accretion, sea level changes, and climatic changes in the context of plate tectonics. We also explore the evolution of life as an integral part of the history of Earth. Lectures and labs emphasize principles and techniques used to reconstruct Earth history. Field trip(s) required.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: Staff

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEOL 120


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 206 - Earth’s Interior: Its Character, Dynamics and Development


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR

    Processes operating deep inside Earth control the shape of Earth’s surface and affect the composition and dynamics of continents, oceans and atmosphere. This course examines geologic and geophysical data pertaining to the character and dynamics of Earth’s interior. We analyze evidence relating mantle convection to plate tectonics, define and interpret the character and evolution of tectonic provinces, and assess whether Earth?s interior changed over time and how it might change in the future. Field trip(s) required.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: S. Wojtal

    Prerequisites & Notes: Geology 120.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 212 - Earth Surface Processes


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR, WADV

    An examination of the evolution of Earth’s surface focusing on the processes that shape the landscape we see today. We will move through the watershed starting with weathering and soil formation, followed by hillslope processes, glaciers, and fluvial processes, including sediment transport and hydrology, in order to describe, measure, model, and interpret landscape processes. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips emphasize integrating descriptive, quantitative, and interpretative aspects of geomorphology. Field Trip(s) required.

    Enrollment Limit: 14
    Instructor: A. Schmidt

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: GEOL 120 or consent of the instructor.
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Environmental Studies


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 235 - Applied GIS


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are used widely in the sciences and other disciplines to examine data that have spatial distribution. This course will introduce students to the methods for collecting spatial data and analyzing those data using GIS to solve geologic problems and communicate their results effectively, mainly through hands-on use of the industry standard ArcGIS software. Working in teams, students will complete a GIS based research project in collaboration with a local community partner.

    Enrollment Limit: 16
    Instructor: A. Schmidt

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: : Geology 120 or consent of the instructor.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 325 - Vertebrate Paleontology


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS

    Vertebrate paleontology investigates major evolutionary innovations in vertebrate life. From the earliest ancestors like Pikaia in the Cambrian, to important transitions to land in the Permian, or back to the water in the Eocene for proto-whales, this course will cover how major changes to body plans allowed fossil vertebrates to occupy nearly all ecosystems and niches. This course will span the Phanerozoic, concentrating on major evolutionary changes rather than a taxonomic survey. 
    Field trip(s) required. 

    Enrollment Limit: 14
    Instructor: W. McLaughlin

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEOL 120


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 340 - Structural Geology


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR

    The measurable deformation that occurs within Earth produces a variety of rock structures. Lectures examine rock structures, analyze the factors that control how rocks deform, discuss the role of rock deformation in tectonics, and discuss interpretations of the deformation patterns in the context of plate tectonics. Labs and problem sets emphasize techniques for observing, analyzing, and interpreting map patterns, outcrops, hand samples, and thin sections of deformed rocks. Field trip(s) required. Prerequisites & Ntes: Any 200-level geology course or consent of instructor, preferably GEOL 206.

    Enrollment Limit: 14
    Instructor: S. Wojtal


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 370 - Paleobiology Seminar


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2NS

    This seminar will examine the history of life using readings from the primary literature. We will study patterns and modes of evolution with the fossil record as our database. Some questions we will tackle include how microevolution and mollecular clocks as studied through biology can and cannot be applied to the the history of life; what is a species? and how do climate change and major earth processes influence the history (and future) of life?

    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Instructor: K. Hubbard

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Geology 120 and a 200-level geology course (preference given to GEOL 204 & GEOL 320).


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
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    GEOL 380 - Great Lakes Limnology


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS

    How has the regional geologic history shaped the biogeochemistry of the Great Lakes? In what ways are humans influencing, and influenced by, the Great Lakes? This class will use primary literature to investigate these questions, in the process covering the local historical and contemporary geology, physical water column dynamics, air-water fluxes, eutrophication, public health concerns, climate change and more. Small group projects in lab will allow students to develop and quantitatively explore aquatic research questions of personal interest using publicly available buoy data, remote sensing, modeling, and class collected data from the field. Field trip(s) required. 

    Instructor: R. Eveleth

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEOL 120


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
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    GEOL 501F - Research in Geology - Full


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS

    Independent or faculty-sponsored research. Students should select a topic and make other necessary arrangements in consultation with an individual faculty member. Consent of instructor required.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: R. Eveleth, D. Hubbard, K. Hubbard, F. Page, A. Schmidt, S. Wojtal

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 501H - Research in Geology - Half


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2NS

    Independent or faculty-sponsored research. Students should select a topic and make other necessary arrangements in consultation with an individual faculty member. Consent of instructor required.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: R. Eveleth, D. Hubbard, K. Hubbard, F. Page, A. Schmidt, S. Wojtal

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  
  
  •  

    GEOL 983 - Stories from Stone: A British History of Our Planet


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS

    This historical geology course will be informed by modern geological thinking, but will also examine the origins of that thinking. Although historical geology classes are histories of the entire planet, they are strongly informed by the place in which they are taught. To examine major events and processes of Earth history, we will use examples from the geology of Great Britain and Europe as illustrations. In parallel with our study of geologic time, we will also take a more historical and philosophical approach to the history of the Earth. Prerequisite: Taught in London. Prior application and acceptance to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: F. Page

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 984A - Geoarchaeology: Sourcing the Past


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    Geoarcheology is the application of earth-science techniques to archaeological interpretation. Geologists and archaeologists often work hand-in-hand to better understand a region?s geological and climatic histories, and their relationships to past human activities. This interdisciplinary course, based on case studies of artifacts housed in London museums, along with site visits, will provide fodder for both archaeological and geological analysis. Topics will include stratigraphy, coastal processes, and Stone Age technologies; geochemical provenancing and geospatial studies; and the geological environments that influence the preservation of archaeological sites. Prerequisite: Taught in London. Prior application and acceptance to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: A. Margaris, F. Page

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 984B - Geoarchaeology: Sourcing the Past


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR

    Geoarcheology is the application of earth-science techniques to archaeological interpretation. Geologists and archaeologists often work hand-in-hand to better understand a region?s geological and climatic histories, and their relationships to past human activities. This interdisciplinary course, based on case studies of artifacts housed in London museums, along with site visits, will provide fodder for both archaeological and geological analysis. Topics will include stratigraphy, coastal processes, and Stone Age technologies; geochemical provenancing and geospatial studies; and the geological environments that influence the preservation of archaeological sites. Prerequisite: Taught in London. Prior application and acceptance to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: A. Margaris, F. Page

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
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    GEOL 995F - Private Reading - Full


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: R. Eveleth, D. Hubbard, K. Hubbard, F. Page, A. Schmidt, S. Wojtal

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Submit Private Reading Card to the Registrar’s Office


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GEOL 995H - Private Reading- Half


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2NS

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via Banner Self Service.. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: D. Hubbard, K. Hubbard, F. Page, A. Schmidt, S. Wojtal, R. Eveleth

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Submit Private Reading Card to the Registrar’s Office


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 101 - Elementary German


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    German 101 comprises the first half of a two semester Elementary German course of study. Acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar along with practice in speaking and writing. Early introduction of spoken German, with reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Use of language laboratory encouraged.

    Enrollment Limit: 22
    Instructor: G. Cooper, S. Huff, A. Merritt


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 102 - Elementary German


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    German 102 comprises the second half of a two semester Elementary German course of study. Acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar along with practice in speaking and writing. Increased emphasis on spoken German, with reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Taught chiefly in German. Use of language laboratory encouraged.

    Enrollment Limit: 22
    Instructor: I. Bruenner, G. Cooper

    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 101 or qualification by placement test.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 203 - Intermediate German


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    German 203 comprises the first half of a two-semester Intermediate German course. Increasing mastery of the basic skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) and a selective grammar review. Readings of narrative prose, drama, and poetry by mainly contemporary authors, along with cultural/historical texts from the 20th century. Completion of Intermediate German will enable students to read a broad range of literary and non-literary texts and to conduct research in their major fields.

    Enrollment Limit: 22
    Instructor: I. Bruenner, S. Huff

    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 102 or qualification by placement test.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 204 - Intermediate German


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    Increasing mastery of the basic skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing). Readings of narrative prose, drama, and poetry by mainly contemporary authors, along with cultural/historical texts from the 20th and 21st centuries. Completion of Intermediate German will enable students to read a broad range of literary and non-literary texts and to conduct research in their major fields.

    Enrollment Limit: 22
    Instructor: I. Bruenner, S. Huff

    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 203 or qualification by placement test.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 302 - Shared Languages Program: Modern Germany Through Film


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course, taught by Prof. Gabriele Dillmann of Denison University, explores Germany through films made since the 1970s. Topics to be discussed include multiculturalism, xenophobic violence, left-wing terrorism, unification, surveillance, and gender identity. All students will meet via the video-conferencing platform Zoom. The course will include students of German across the GLCA partner institutions. While the films are available with English subtitles, all discussions and written responses will be in German.      

    Instructor: S. Huff

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: 4 semesters of college German, or the equivalent.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 303 - Shared languages Program: German for Business Culture


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This is a Shared Languages Program (SLP) course taught by Dr. Gabriele Dillmann at Denison University and taken through Zoom technology. Topics include Germany’s federal states, Germany in the EU, multicultural Germany, the social system, industry and money economy, high tech, environment, taxes, and consumer power. Students will write job applications and business correspondence, practice phone and email etiquette, and learn to read and interpret bureaucratic German. Students will connect with business leaders in Germany and German-based companies in the US. Students will engage with German speakers from different business backgrounds in real-life scenarios via video-conferencing.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: S. Huff

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: Four semesters of German or instructor’s approval


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 305 - Conversation and Composition


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WINT

    Expansion and refinement of speaking, writing, and listening skills through a variety of in-class activities (including films and writing). Readings and discussions will cover topics of current social, political, and cultural interest in the German-language countries as reflected in the media and in essays and articles by creative writers.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: I. Bruenner

    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 204 or qualification by placement test.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 311 - Enlightenment to Classicism


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WADV

    A study of major movements, problems, and oeuvres in the literature from the 18th to the mid-19th century (Enlightenment through Romanticism). This course will explore the culturally productive tension between nascent nationalism and Goethean cosmopolitanism. Prose, drama, and poetry by Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, and others. This course is intended for students who have not yet done 400-level work in German literature.

    Enrollment Limit: 22
    Instructor: S. Huff

    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 204 or qualification by placement test.
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Theater, Comparative Literature


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 312 - German Literature: Young Germany to Modernism


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WINT

    Masterpieces of drama, narrative prose, and poetry from the mid-19th century to the modern period, including works by Buchner, Grillparzer, Droste-Hulshoff, Thomas Mann, Lasker-Schuler, Kafka, and Brecht. This course is intended for students who have not yet done 400-level work in German literature.

    Enrollment Limit: 22
    Instructor: G. Cooper

    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 204 or qualification by placement test.
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Theater, Comparative Literature


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 353 - Afro-Germans through Art, Literature, and Film


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course focuses on the literature and history of Afro-Germans in a global context. Although part of the African Diaspora, the emergence of Afro-Germans differs from many of the other groups of African descent. Using literary texts, films, historical images and documents, this course seeks to examine the multiple links between Afro-Germans and other people of African descent, the connections they formed and the emergence of different organizations that consciously sought to connect themselves globally across languages and cultures. Taught in English.

    Enrollment Limit: 16
    Instructor: S. Jones


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 395 - Shared Languages Program: The Music of Germany


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course, taught by Prof. Lee Forester of Hope College, introduces musical artists from Germany and Austria from medieval Minnesänger until today. All students will meet via the video-conferencing platform, Zoom. The course will include students of German across our GLCA partner institutions. Topics cut across genres: classic, Schlager, Kaberett, Liedermacher, Neue Deutsche Welle, Pop, Rock, Punk, Jazz, Hip Hop, Electronica, and Heavy Metal. We will listen to music and to artists as they discuss their music. Expect your vocabulary and listening comprehension to improve significantly! Taught in German. 

    Instructor: S. Huff

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Four semesters of College German or the equivalent


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 411 - German Today: Seminar in Advanced Grammar and Composition


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WADV

    The seminar is intended for students with advanced skills in German who wish to expand their competency in grammar, writing and vocabulary. Increased fluency in selected grammar topics will enable students to analyze and compose in a variety of writing styles. Utilizing a diverse array of media (e.g., newspapers, film and broadcast news), thematic content will encompass such areas as culture, literature, politics, economics, and science. Along with regular written assignments and grammar tests, active class participation is required. Prerequisite: 300-Level Course in German.

    Enrollment Limit: 22
    Instructor: I. Bruenner


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 433 - Senior Seminar: Staging Revolution


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WADV

    Can artistic techniques encourage audiences to embrace a radical politics, instigate social change, or create a more critical spectator? This course explores the relationship between aesthetics and politics in film and theater through the works of playwright Bertolt Brecht. After studying concepts and practices of the epic theater, we’ll be equipped to investigate film adaptations and productions of Brecht’s plays; German heirs to the epic theater; and avant-garde films by Jean-Luc Godard, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Alexander Kluge, and Lars von Trier.

    Enrollment Limit: 22
    Instructor: G. Cooper

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: Two 300-level courses in German
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Comparative Literature


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  
  
  •  

    GERM 995F - Private Reading - Full


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: G. Cooper, E. Hamilton, S. Huff, A. Merrritt

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Submit Private Reading Card to the Registrar’s Office


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GERM 995H - Private Reading - Half


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2HU

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via Banner Self Service. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: G. Cooper, E. Hamilton, S. Huff, A. Merrritt

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Submit Private Reading Card to the Registrar’s Office


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GREK 101 - Elementary Greek


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    Learn to read ancient Greek! Greek is the language of Homer, Socrates, Alexander the Great, and the writers of the New Testament. In the first semester, we cover roughly two-thirds of basic Greek grammar, reading ancient Greek passages from day one. By the end of the semester, students will fully understand the Greek syntactical system, and will be reading passages adapted from the fifth-century BCE historians Herodotus and Thucydides.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: A. Wilburn


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GREK 102 - Elementary Greek II


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    Keep learning to read ancient Greek! We will complete the study of basic Greek language and syntax. By the end of the semester, students will read selections from Lysias’s On the Murder of Eratosthenes, a defense speech from fifth-century Athens, in which the speaker claims justification for the killing of his wife’s adulterous lover.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: Staff

    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 101 or equivalent.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GREK 201 - Intermediate Greek I: Plato’s Apology


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    Plato’s Apology . One of the central figures in the foundation of Western philosophy, Socrates left behind no written treatises. His student, Plato, developed Socrates’ methods of thought in a series of speeches and dialogues; in this class, we will read Plato’s version of Socrates’ defense speech (or Apology ) from the year 399, when the famous thinker and critic was put on trial for his life by the Athenian state. We will also review fundamental aspects of Greek grammar and syntax.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: K. Ormand

    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 102 or equivalent.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GREK 202 - Intermediate Greek II: Homer’s Iliad


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    The year, 1083 BCE. The place, Troy. At issue, the recovery of Helen, Menelaos’ wife and the most beautiful woman in the world, who was abducted by (or ran away with) Paris, a notoriously charming Trojan. Students will learn the fundamentals of Homeric Greek and the principles of oral poetic composition by reading significant passages from the Iliad, the first written literature of the West.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: K. Ormand

    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 201 or equivalent.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GREK 304 - Greek Lyric Poetry


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    The writers of Greek Lyric introduced a highly personal sensibility to the world of poetry. Selections include passages from Archilochus, Anacreon, Bacchylides, Simonides, and Solon. The course pays special attention to Sappho, the pre-eminent writer of erotic verse from archaic Greece, and the first woman poet in the West. We will consider the development of a lyric genre or genres, with attention to erotic, political, and satiric themes. Secondary readings on individual authors and their influence.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: K. Ormand

    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 202 or equivalent.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GREK 311 - Euripides


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WADV

    In this course we will read Euripides’ Bacchae. Euripides is the most exciting and innovative of the Athenian dramatists, and this play will not disappoint: it explores the darker side of Bacchus, the god of wine and ecstasy! Readings will include contemporary studies of the play as well as Nietzsche’s considerable involvement with it in his Birth of Tragedy.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: B. Lee

    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 202 or equivalent.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  
  
  •  

    GREK 995F - Private Reading - Full


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via Banner Self Service. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: B. Lee, K. Ormand, C. Trinacty, A. Wilburn

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Submit Private Reading Card to the Registrar’s Office


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GREK 995H - Private Reading - Half


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2HU

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via Banner Self Service. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: B. Lee, K. Ormand, C. Trinacty, A. Wilburn

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Submit Private Reading Card to the Registrar’s Office


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 060 - Inquiries in Critical Fat Studies


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Module
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2SS

    This module on Critical Fat Studies focuses on the way that fat bodies are also implicitly marginalized by gender and race. Students will discuss contemporary and foundational texts in fat studies and will undertake intersectional analyses of mainstream discourses about fat bodies. How do disability, race, sexual orientation, class, and health all impact the way we read fat bodies, and the fat people who inhabit them? Who gets to claim fatness as an identity, and what does it even mean to “be” fat? Students will co-facilitate a class discussion, author autobiographical texts, and compete a final research paper.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: E. Director


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 101 - Introduction to Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course serves as an introduction to Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. The central objective is to familiarize students with key concepts, theories, and sociopolitical contentions pertaining to intersecting forms of identity, including gender, sexuality, race, nationality, and others. Paying particular attention to how power marks our experiences of human difference, this course examines issues relating to embodiment, gender performance, violence, and oppression. In so doing, it draws from a diverse and interdisciplinary body of feminist and intersectional critiques, enabling students? analyses of relevant social, cultural, and political debates in historical and contemporary contexts.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: E. Heiliger, A. LaGrotteria


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 108 - Introduction to Religion: Women and the Western Traditions


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    An introduction to Judaism, Christianity and Islam that focuses on women’s experiences and gender roles. This course will examine representations of women in sacred texts; primary sources by and about women from various historical periods, and contemporary feminist voices within each religious tradition. Topics to be investigated include: rabbinic teachings on biblical women, the role of women in early Christian heretical movements, discourses of the veil in Islam.

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: M. Kamitsuka

    Cross List Information: This course is cross listed with RELG 108


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 135 - Introduction to Religion: Devotion and Performance in South Asia


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU

    How does devotional literature and performance interact with and become shaped by social and historical circumstances in different South Asian traditions? In this course students think comparatively about how South Asian Muslim, Sikh, and Hindu communities express devotion through literature and performance. We will learn to read, view, listen to, and critically engage with various genres of medieval and modern literature and performing and visual arts that express passionate devotion to diverse conceptions of the divine, as well as a range of emotions-fear, longing, liberation. We will be attentive to what is shared and distinct in articulations of devotion across traditions, periods, and regions.

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: E. Bachrach

    Cross List Information: Crosslisted with RELG 135


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 201 - Latinas/os in Comparative Perspective


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course analyzes the varied experiences of Latinas/os in the United States. Using ethnography, literature, film, and history, this course will explore questions of immigration/transnationalism; culture and political economy; racial, ethnic, gender, and sexual identities among Latinas/os; the struggle for place in American cities; as well as the intersections of gender, work and family.

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: G. Perez

    Cross List Information: Cross listed with CAST 201


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 202 - Visible Bodies and the Politics of Sexuality


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, WINT

    This course considers how visual culture produces and contests concepts of sexuality in American society. We will analyze how mainstream culture universalizes certain experiences of gender and sexuality, as they are inflected by race, ethnicity, class and nationalism, as well as how marginalized groups have used visual representation to contest and subvert these hegemonic ideals. Through case studies, we will explore concepts such as the gaze, spectacle, and agency.

    Enrollment Limit: 30
    Instructor: W. Kozol

    Cross List Information: This course is cross-listed with CAST 202


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 207 - Introduction to Queer Studies


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course provides an interdisciplinary grounding in historical and theoretical foundations of queer culture and theory. We will explore LGBTQ history alongside contemporary queer cultural studies. This course will address the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, ability, age, nationality, and religion. We will explore how historical, social, political, and economic systems have shaped and reshaped what it means to be queer or claim queer identity in the United States and abroad. Students will engage with multiple disciplinary approaches that have both shaped queer studies and have been shaped by queer methodology.

    Enrollment Limit: 30
    Instructor: K. Cerankowski


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 209 - Sex, Race and Technology in Global Labor Markets


    Next Offered: 2016-2017

    Semester Offered: Second Semester, First Module
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: 2 SS

    This course analyzes how technology helps to create disparities of race, sex, and gender in non-industrialized and non-mechanized forms of labor, such as: care work, domestic labor, sex work, and surrogacy. We will study historically the role of science in establishing the categories of race and sex.  Students will be invited to consider how technology currently plays a role in maintaining racial, sexed, and gendered hierarchies, especially within the context of global labor markets.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: R. Limki


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 227 - Introduction to Feminist Science Studies


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Courses
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    This course investigates the scientific production of race, gender, and sexuality, particularly in the biosciences. We will consider such questions as: What is objectivity and why does it matter to scientific research? How do cultural assumptions about race, gender, sexuality, and the body shape scientific knowledge production in different historical periods? Sources include theories and critiques of science, historical and contemporary science publications, and the Science section of the NY Times

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: E Heiliger

    Cross List Information: Cross-listed with CAST 217


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 232 - Religion and Culture in Indian Epics


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    The Mahabharata and the Ramayana have been crucial religious and cultural texts in South Asia for millennia. In this course, we engage with the dynamic traditions of both epics - from Sanskrit versions composed over 2,000 years ago to contemporary theatrical, comic book, and televised renditions. While we will become familiar with major narrative, religious, and social themes of each text, our focus will be on how ideas about gender and sexuality are negotiated historically and in the vibrant modern lives of the epics. Feminist and postcolonial theories will inform how we approach each of our primary sources.

    Field trips required. Visits to the Allen Memorial Art Museum and Mudd Library Special Collections play an important part in the course.

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: E. Bachrach

    Cross List Information: Crosslisted with RLEG 232


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 261 - Gender Theory and the Study of Religion


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course will examine the various ways in which feminist scholars bring gender issues to the academic study of religion. Topics to be addressed will include: feminist critiques of androcentrism in ‘classic’ theories of religion; methods for the historical retrieval of suppressed women’s voices in historical texts; sociological and ethnographical approaches to investigating women’s marginalized ritual practices; feminist approaches to philosophy of religion and theology. Prerequisite & Notes:

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: M. Kamitsuka


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 263 - Roots of Religious Feminism in North America


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WINT

    This course analyzes the religious views underpinning women?s literature, political advocacy, public speaking, and social reform work from colonial days to the 1970s, with a focus on primary sources. Students will apply the knowledge and methods acquired during the course to pursue their own research interests in women?s religious history in North America. No previous study of religion, U.S. history, or gender theory is necessary.

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: M. Kamitsuka


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 264 - Abortion and Religion


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course provides an overview of how abortion is addressed religiously in a global context. We will study current debates between prolife and prochoice representatives from Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish traditions on issues such as women?s rights, fetal personhood, and biblical teachings about human life. We will examine abortion controversies worldwide, including: anti-abortion clinic violence, one-child forced abortion laws, and incarceration for women in countries where abortion is illegal. We will also study religious practices developed for and/or by women who have had abortions, such as Buddhist mizuko kujo or Jewish mikvah rituals.

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: M. Kamitsuka

    Cross List Information: Cross-listed with RELG 264


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 304 - Transnational Feminisms


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course examines the possibility of transnational feminist resistance to global and local matrices of oppression and domination, in the context of debates about solidarity and difference. Drawing from the works of feminist, queer, post-colonial, and critical race theorists and activists, we interrogate the gendered politics of borders, national membership, state-sponsored violence, colonialism, imperialism, and neoliberalism. We will also critically analyze how each of these elements interacts with often-divergent forms of feminist politics. Each course module will incorporate an ongoing examination of the ways in which gender, power, and politics come to bear on the production of knowledge.

    Enrollment Limit: 14
    Instructor: K. Miller

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 305 - Feminist Research Methodologies


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU

    This course traces the historical and dialectical impact of feminist epistemologies on disciplines of the social sciences and humanities. We will explore feminist approaches to research practices including oral history, case studies, archival research, visual and literary criticism, survey/content analysis, and fieldwork. Throughout the semester, each student works on an individual research proposal that incorporates interdisciplinary methods and includes a literature review.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: E. Bachrach

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Priority given to GSFS majors.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 306 - Gender and Migration


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    This course offers an intensive analysis of the gendered dimensions of US immigration politics and policy through an examination of the specific experiences of women migrants. Using a combination of migration theory and intersectional feminist theory, we analyze historical trends that have lead to an increase in the number of women migrants, including globalization, neoliberal trade agreements, and changes in the US political landscape. We also examine gender-specific labor issues, gendered violence, and forced migration.

    Enrollment Limit: 14
    Instructor: K. Miller

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Cross List Information: POLT 306


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 319 - Sexual “Absences”


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WADV

    This course explores how the absence of sex has been uniquely constructed through American histories and politics of race and sexuality. Several scholars have charted the history of sexuality through desire, practice, and identity, which resulted in the invention of sexual categories like heterosexuality and homosexuality. But few have looked at the history of sexuality in America through the lens of “absence.” In this course, we will explore how abstinence, celibacy, virginity, chastity, and asexuality have been historically and rhetorically shaped by the sexual revolution, capitalism and the industrial revolution, sexology, religion, and social justice movements in the United States.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: K. Cerankowski

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: CAST/GSFS 100, GSFS 101.
    Cross List Information: Cross-listed with CAST 319


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 340 - Gender and the Visual Arts in Europe, 1450-1750


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, WINT

    This course examines understandings of gender in early modern Europe through the lens of the visual arts and material culture. We will consider not only how cultural conventions of gender limited experiences, but also how marginalized voices challenged conventions. We will explore how gender affected the artistic production of women artists such as Artemisia Gentileschi and Sofonisba Anguissola. And we will consider how women commissioned and collected works of art to construct an identity. We will also discuss how attitudes towards masculinity were shaped through the visual arts and bodily adornment. Field trip required. Prerequisite; 100 level art history course or a GSFS course.

    Enrollment Limit: 30
    Instructor: C. Neilson

    Prerequisites & Notes: 100 level art history course or a GSFS course.
    Cross List Information: Crosslisted with ARTS 340


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 375 - Feminist Ethnography and Dance Performance


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course explores transnational feminist epistemologies alongside performance studies research methods, investigating the impact of a feminist approach to ethnography in performance studies, and the opportunities afforded by performance analysis to a feminist ethnographic practice. Texts exemplifying feminist ethnographic methods in dance and performance studies explore intercontinental connections and themes based on media, geography, and collective aesthetic and political impulses. Case studies cover topics addressed by feminist artists in their work (ritual, motherhood, gaze theory, sexual violence, lesbian identity, war, among others).

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: M. De la Cruz

    Cross List Information: Crosslisted with DANC 375


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 400 - Senior Capstone


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits: 0 credits
    Attribute: 0EX

    This non-credit course represents the capstone requirement for the major in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. It can be fulfilled by enrolling in and passing an appropriate course in another department as articulated in the description of the major.

    Instructor: G. Mattson

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 403 - Queer Trauma Narratives


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course examines narratives of trauma in queer lives through literature, film, media, and performance in conjunction with trauma theory and psychoanalysis. We pay specific attention to questions of community, healing, violence, and affect in order to explore narration, identity, power, and oppression. We interrogate the purposes these narratives serve, whether as healing methods or as cautionary tales that provide cultural insight at the intersections of queerness and race, sex, disability, class, gender, and ethnicity. By adopting the lens of trauma studies in psychology and psychoanalysis, we look critically at the function of trauma in identity and community formation.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: K. Cerankowski

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: CAST 100, GSFS 101, or equivalent.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 419 - Disability Studies


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WADV

    Advance seminar in critical disability studies, with particular focus on developing epistemological, methodological, and theoretical fluency in interdisciplinary and intersectional approaches to the field.  Discussion based with significant weekly reading load, a semester-long research project, scaffolded writing assignments, and regular written and oral peer review of assignments.  Emphasis on collaborative feminist pedagogy.  Topics may include: disability, ableism, access, genetic testing, cancer, anxiety, depression, “health”, autoimmune disorder, Multiple Chemical Sensitivities, crip theory, queer of color critique, autism, neuro(a)typicality, Universal Design, and relationships between race / class / gender / sexuality / nationality / embodiment and ability / disability.  Writing Advanced.

    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Instructor: E. Heilinger

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  
  
  
  •  

    GSFS 995F - Private Reading - Full


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via Banner Self Service. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Instructor: G. Mattson

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    GSFS 995H - Private Reading - Half


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2HU

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via Banner Self Service. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Instructor: G. Mattson

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    HISP 101 - Elementary Spanish I


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    Strong emphasis on communicative tasks to show students how Spanish is used across the Spanish-speaking world in real-life situations. Culture is an important thread that is tightly woven throughout the course. Basic grammar and vocabulary will be introduced and practiced through intensive oral and written practice. Weekly compositions and meetings with language tutors. This course is taught in Spanish.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: K. Tungseth-Faber


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    HISP 102 - Elementary Spanish II


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course is a continuation of HISP 101, complemented by additional readings to enhance written and oral skills. Grammar will continue to be introduced through more intensive oral and written practice. Students have to attend one mandatory conversation class per week. Day and time TBA.  This course is taught in Spanish.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: K. Tungseth-Faber

    Prerequisites & Notes: Students with any previous knowledge of Spanish other than from Oberlin College must first take the placement exam before enrolling in this course.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    HISP 202 - Intermediate Spanish I


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course is a continuation of HISP 102. It adopts a format integrating grammar, oral and written practice in exercises, conversation and readings which evolve within a cultural context. Students have to attend one mandatory conversation class on Tuesdays or Thursdays for one hour, time TBA.  This course is taught in Spanish.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: Y. Encalada-Egúsquiza, S. Gutiérrez Negrón

    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 102 or consent of instructor.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    HISP 203 - Intermediate Spanish II


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course is a continuation of HISP 202. It adopts a format integrating grammar, oral and written practice in exercises, conversation and readings which evolve within a cultural context. Students have to attend one mandatory conversation class on Tuesdays or Thursdays for one hour, time TBA. This course is taught in Spanish.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: C. Tovar

    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 202 or consent of instructor. 


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

  
  •  

    HISP 303 - Conversation and Communication in Spanish


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    The goal of this course is to prepare non-native speakers for the rigors and the rewards of conversing with Spanish-speakers about topics of shared interest. Reading, writing, listening and speaking skills will be emphasized as we study works in the Allen Memorial Art Museum collections, practice digital storytelling, discuss current events in the Spanish-speaking world, and pursue student-directed personal learning projects. Highly recommended for students returning from or preparing to study abroad.

    Enrollment Limit: 18
    Instructor: F. Fridman

    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 203 or the equivalent.


    Click here for the Fall Semester Schedule of Classes
    Click here for the Spring Semester Schedule of Classes

 

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