Dec 10, 2019  
Course Catalog 2005-2006 
    
Course Catalog 2005-2006 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Art


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The Department of Art faculty consists of a nearly even number of artists and art historians. These numbers underscore the department’s interest in, and commitment to, a balanced study of the visual arts in a liberal arts curriculum. The Allen Memorial Art Museum is an important resource for art students. Courses routinely meet there and students have the opportunity to participate in the Museum’s Docent program. Introductory courses—whether in studio or art history—presuppose that the student has no prior experience in art. The three majors offered—art history, studio, and visual arts—are designed to offer individuals a solid preparation for graduate school or a career in art-related fields.

Advanced Placement. The department offers no credit and no exemption for AP work in either Art History or Studio Art.

Entry-level course suggested sequence:

1. ‑Art History. Prospective majors are advised to take all required introductory courses and to fulfill the history and language requirements as early as possible in their college careers.

2. ‑Studio Art. It is highly advisable for those intending to major in Studio Art to take one or more “Visual Concepts and Processes” courses as early as possible. First-year students and sophomores considering the major should consult with one of the studio instructors in planning their programs.

Major in the Art Department: The department insists that its programs of major study be deeply integrated with the overall liberal arts education that Oberlin both endorses and offers. In planning their programs of study, students should therefore keep in mind the fact that all three major programs may be completed within the two final years of work toward the BA degree. Requirements for the three majors are as follows:

Major in Art History. The department offers Art History courses in four separate groups. Courses with 100 and 200 numbers provide a broad introduction to the field and are open without prerequisite. Courses with 300 and 400 numbers comprise the core of the major in Art History, and are available only to students who have completed the prerequisites or have received the instructor’s consent to enroll.

A.   ‑Courses in the 100-numbered group have been designed to provide broad, synthetic overviews of Art History as an intellectual enterprise. In this group are both large lecture courses and First-Year Seminars. Note: The First-Year Seminars meet none of the requirements for completing the major in Art History and may not be applied towards major credit. No more than one 100-numbered large lecture course may count towards the major.

B.    ‑200-numbered courses provide entry into the Art History curriculum by introducing students to the methods and concepts peculiar to the discipline. They place particular emphasis on acquiring the visual skills necessary for the close, analytical scrutiny of works of art. To that end, these courses make intensive use of the collections of the Allen Memorial Art Museum. The 200-numbered courses give access to courses numbered 300 and 400, and are among the major requirements.

C.    ‑300-numbered courses provide lectures on the major periods and styles in the art-historical fields taught in the department.

D.   ‑400-numbered courses focus on selected problems in art history in a discussion-oriented format. They treat themes, techniques, traditions of representation, or particular critical issues.

At the 300- and 400-levels, students pursue advanced topics that provide training in art-historical research and writing. Some majors complete their work in the department in the year-long Honors (500-numbered).

The Department of Art faculty consists of a nearly even number of artists and art historians. These numbers underscore the Department’s interest in, and commitment to, a balanced study of the visual arts in a liberal arts curriculum. The Allen Memorial Art Museum is an important resource for art students. Courses routinely meet there and students have the opportunity to participate in the Museum’s Docent program. Introductory courses—whether in studio or art history—presuppose that the student has no prior experience in art. The three majors offered— art history, studio, and visual arts—are designed to offer individuals a solid preparation for graduate school or a career in art-related fields.

Advanced Placement

The Department offers no credit and no exemption for AP work in either Art History or Studio Art.

Entry-level course suggested sequence:

  1. Art History. Prospective majors are advised to take all required introductory courses and to fulfill the history and language requirements as early as possible in their college careers.
  2. Studio Art. It is highly advisable for those intending to major in Studio Art to take one or more “Visual Concepts and Processes” courses as early as possible. First-year students and sophomores considering the major should consult with one of the studio instructors in planning their programs

Majors in the Art Department:

The Department of Art insists that its programs of major study be deeply integrated with the overall liberal arts education that Oberlin both endorses and offers. In planning their programs of study, students should therefore keep in mind the fact that all three major programs may be completed within the two final years of work towards the BA degree. Requirements for the three majors are as follows:

Art History

The department offers Art History courses in four separate groups. Courses with 100 and 200 numbers provide a broad introduction to the field and are open without prerequisite. Courses with 300 and 400 numbers comprise the core of the major in Art History, and are available only to students who have completed the prerequisites or have received the instructor’s consent to enroll.

  1. Courses in the 100-numbered group have been designed to provide broad, synthetic overviews of Art History as an intellectual enterprise. In this group are both large lecture courses and First-Year Seminars. Note: The First-Year Seminars meet none of the requirements for completing the major in Art History and may not be applied towards major credit. No more than one 100-numbered large lecture course may count towards the major.
  2. 200-numbered courses provide entry into the Art History curriculum by introducing students to the methods and concepts peculiar to the discipline. They place particular emphasis on acquiring the visual skills necessary for the close, analytical scrutiny of works of art. To that end, these courses make intensive use of the collections of the Allen Memorial Art Museum. The 200-numbered courses give access to courses numbered 300 and 400, and are among the major requirements.
  3. 300-numbered courses provide lectures on the major periods and styles in the arthistorical fields taught in the Department.
  4. 400-numbered courses focus on selected problems in art history in a discussion-oriented format. They treat themes, techniques, traditions of representation, or particular critical issues.

At the 300- and 400-levels, students pursue advanced topics that provide training in art-historical research and writing. Some majors complete their work in the department in the year-long Honors (500-numbered) Program.

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