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  Dec 15, 2017
 
 
    
Course Catalog 2010-2011 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Hispanic Studies


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Patrick O’Connor, Associate Professor; Department Chair
Ana Cara,  Professor
Sebastiaan Faber, Professor
Esmeralda Martínez-Tapia, Lecturer
Barbara Sawhill, Lecturer
Kim Tungseth-Faber,
Instructor

 

Mission Statement.

The Department of Hispanic Studies at Oberlin College is committed to offering its students an outstanding liberal-arts education in the literatures and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, based on a solid and thorough knowledge of the Spanish language.

The program offers three levels of study, designed to meet the specific needs of each student. The first of these (Hispanic Studies 101, 102, 202, 203, 204, 205, 304, and 334) focuses mainly on learning Spanish and understanding Hispanic cultures.  Our language classes use the most sophisticated technology to help develop communicative proficiency in Spanish. Since this is not possible without cultural knowledge, all language classes give ample attention to the diversity of Spanish, Latin American, and Latino/a cultures as well. Among our language courses is a class especially tailored for “Heritage Speakers” (students who grew up speaking Spanish but who have not had the chance to study the language formally).

The second level, consisting of the other classes in the 300 series, includes a wide range of courses on literature and cultural history, including topics such as Latino/Latin American folklore and Spanish and Latin American film.

The courses at the final or 400 level are small, seminar-style classes that focus on specific works, topics or trends in the Spanish-speaking world.  Outstanding Hispanic Studies majors are encouraged to write an honors thesis on a topic of their choosing, under the guidance of our faculty.

The department’s educational goal, then, is not merely the acquisition of knowledge. Rather, our students are offered the opportunity to experience a cultural heritage which is more rich, diverse, and alive than ever. In addition to the many courses on the language, literature, film, culture, and history of the Spanish-speaking world, we offer a wide spectrum of complementary programs and activities through Oberlin’s Casa Hispánica (see below). Furthermore, we strongly encourage our students to study abroad. Oberlin has two programs of its own, one in Córdoba, Spain (PRESHCO), and one in Puebla, México (PMCSP).  We also endorse a great variety of other programs in Spain and Latin America.  Language students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of our Winter Term program in Guadalajara, México.

In short, participation in the Hispanic Studies Program at Oberlin will allow you to understand, appreciate, and enjoy the great diversity of human cultures. And, as has been proven by our alumni, it will open up a wide range of personal and professional opportunities.

 

Major


For students declaring a Hispanic Studies major in or after September 2009, the core requirements are the following:
• at least 11 courses (33 hours);
• these should include at least 8 courses above the 200 level taught in Spanish, including two 400- level courses taken at Oberlin.


Further requirements:
• The major should present a balanced distribution of work taken in Peninsular and Latin American areas, and include the study of various genres, literary movements, and historical periods.
• Before taking a 400-level course, students should have taken at least two of the four survey courses combining one Spanish and one Latin American survey, as well as one pre-19th century and one post-19th century survey (i.e., HISP 309 and 318, or HISP 310 and 317).
• All majors will designate one 400-level course taken in their senior year as their capstone course. In addition to the normal coursework, the capstone includes a substantive individual project and a public presentation.


Additional stipulations:
• Language courses at the beginning or intermediate levels (taken at Oberlin, abroad, or at other institutions) will not count toward the major.
• Up to 3 AP credits may be counted toward the major at the 300-level for scores of 4 or 5 on the Spanish language or literature exams.
• Courses in the First-Year Seminar Program (FYSP) taught by Hispanic Studies faculty on topics related to the Spanish-speaking world may count toward the major, as may any other course taught at Oberlin (e.g. in History, Politics, Anthropology, Comparative American Studies, etc.) whose central focus falls within Latin American, Latino/a, and Iberian Studies.
• Up to 18 credits from Oberlin’s PRESHCO program may be counted toward the major.
• Up to 9 hours of transfer credit per semester, including coursework done abroad, may be counted toward the major, for a total of 15 hours. For Oberlin’s program in Puebla, México, up to 18 hours may counted.
• No course in which the student has earned a grade lower than a C-/CR/P can be used to fulfill the requirements of the major.
• Courses taken abroad or at other institutions cannot be counted as 400-level credit.


The major portfolio
Students declaring a Hispanic Studies major will be assigned an online portfolio in which they record and reflect on their progress through the major. The online portfolio should be updated at least once a semester, in preparation for class registration. In addition to students’ reflections, the portfolio may serve to upload academic work or other related activities and accomplishments.

Study abroad and double majors
All Hispanic Studies majors are strongly encouraged to spend at least one semester in a Spanish-speaking country (see below). Students may pursue a double major, or a major/minor combination with Latin American Studies or other related fields such as Classics and the other modern languages, Sociology, Anthropology, Comparative Literature, Art, History, Comparative American Studies, or Politics. Studies in Hebrew present a Hispanic Studies major with a rare opportunity for research in the Medieval area, while combining Italian and Spanish is both useful and important for studies in the Renaissance and Golden Age.

Note: Students who declared their major before September 2009 may choose to opt into these new requirements, and should notify the department chair of their intention.

 

Minor


For students declaring a Hispanic Studies minor in or after September 2009, the core requirements are the following:
• at least 6 courses (18 hours);
• these should include at least 5 courses above the 200 level taught in Spanish, including at least one course at the 400 level taken at Oberlin.

Further information about the minor:
• Language courses at the beginning or intermediate levels (taken at Oberlin, abroad or at other institutions) will not count toward the minor.
• Up to 3 AP credits may be counted toward the minor at the 300-level for scores of 4 or 5 on the Spanish language or literature exams.
• Courses in the First-Year Seminar Program (FYSP) taught by Hispanic Studies faculty on topics related to the Spanish-speaking world may count toward the minor, as may any other course taught at Oberlin (e.g. in History, Politics, Anthropology, Comparative American Studies, etc.) whose central focus falls within Latin American, Latino/a, and Iberian Studies.
• Up to 9 credits from Oberlin’s PRESHCO program may be counted toward the minor.
• Up to 6 hours of transfer credit, including coursework done abroad, may be counted toward the minor. For Oberlin’s program in Puebla, México, up to 9 hours may be counted.
• The minor should present a balanced distribution of work taken in Peninsular and Latin American areas, and include the study of various genres, literary movements, and historical periods.
• Before taking a 400-level course, students should have taken at least two of the four survey courses combining one Spanish and one Latin American survey, as well as one pre-19th century and one post-19th century survey (i.e., HISP 309 and 318, or HISP 310 and 317).
• No course in which the student has earned a grade lower than a C-/CR/P can be used to fulfill the requirements of the minor.

Note: Students who declared their minor before September 2009 may choose to opt into these new requirements, and should notify the department chair of their intention.

 

 

Advanced Placement


Students qualifying under this program will be assigned advanced standing on the basis of results in the qualifying examinations administered by the College Board and credit will be awarded for HISP 300. Scores of 4 and 5 on the Spanish language exam automatically receive three hours of college credit as Hispanic Studies 300, qualifying students to work at the 300 level.  First-and second-year students having taken the AP exams are encouraged to take HISP 306 before taking HISP 309, 310, 317, or 318. HISP 300 counts toward the total number of academic credits required for the major.

Initial Placement


Students who begin Hispanic Studies at Oberlin will take HISP 101 (five hours). Beyond HISP 101 the particular entry point within the sequence of language courses depends upon a student’s background in Spanish and upon the results of a placement test, administered at the beginning of each semester for those beginning HISP 102, 202, 203, and 304. The placement test is required of every student with a prior knowledge of Spanish who wishes to enroll, except for students who have taken the AP exam (see above) or the SAT II exam in Spanish. Students who have taken the SAT II exam in Spanish should enroll in courses according to their score:

800-675 - HISP 300 level
675-625 - HISP 304
520-625 - HISP 202 or 204

The placement exam will be available online during registration.  Please see the department’s web site at http://new.oberlin.edu/arts-and-sciences/departments/hispanic_studies/language_placement.dot

Honors


The Honors Program in Hispanic Studies is a two-semester sequence of six hours of independent study, in consultation with a faculty sponsor, culminating in either an honors thesis or a special project, e.g., a translation, creative writing, or video project.  Students may be invited to participate in the program, but are also encouraged to express their interest to the faculty.  For more information see: http://new.oberlin.edu/arts-and-sciences/departments/hispanic_studies/capstonehonors.dot

La Casa Hispánica


Since 1962, the department has sponsored La Casa Hispánica. The purpose of La Casa is to provide an environment where students speak Spanish and benefit from activities related to the culture of the Hispanic world. The director and her two graduate assistants are native Spanish speakers from Latin America and Spain. There are rooming accommodations for 28 men and women. Tables at which Spanish is spoken are maintained in El Rincón Latino at Stevenson Dining Hall.

Oberlin in Spain and México


Oberlin has two study abroad programs of its own, one in Córdoba, Spain (PRESHCO), and one in Puebla, México (PMCSP). Participants in these programs (see for details below) may receive 15 hours per semester of academic credit toward graduation. Nine hours each semester, for a total of 18 hours per year, may be counted toward the Hispanic Studies major. Before planning to participate in these programs, students on financial aid should consult the Director of Financial Aid.

Although the specific courses offered vary each semester, they will normally cover topics in Spanish language, and Spanish and Mexican literature, history, art history, and social sciences, as well as different courses on the European Union (Córdoba) and the relationship between México and the United States (Puebla). Both programs have a strong curriculum in the humanities (art, history, performing arts, including dance, music, and theater, philosophy, language and literature) and the social sciences (anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, sociology). In both programs students will have the opportunity to take regular undergraduate courses with Mexican and Spanish students. See the PRESHCO/PMCSP campus coordinator for an updated list of courses and equivalent Oberlin course numbers.

 

Study Abroad in Córdoba, Spain


The Programa de Estudios Hispánicos en Córdoba (PRESHCO) is an interdisciplinary course of study at the University of Córdoba sponsored by a five-college consortium (Oberlin, Smith, Trinity, Wellesley, Wheaton MA, and Wooster). All PRESHCO courses are taught by Córdoba faculty from the University of Córdoba; in addition, students may directly enroll in regular university courses. Courses recently taught include: “The Colonization of America,” “The Novel of the 19th Century,” “Women’s Voices in 20th Century Spain,” “The Spanish Middle Ages: Christians, Moslems, and Jews,” “Methods and Techniques in Andalusian Art Restoration,” “The Semitic Legacy in Hispanic Societies,” “Political Structures and Institutions of the European Union,” and “Spanish Art: From Velázquez to Picasso.” For more information, see: www.wooster.edu/preshco/preshco

 

Study Abroad in Puebla, México


The Program for Mexican Culture and Society in Puebla (PMCSP) is a residential direct-matriculation program in Puebla, México, in collaboration with the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (BUAP)—one of México’s leading public teaching and research universities—sponsored by a four-college consortium including Oberlin, Smith, Wellesley,  and Wheaton MA. Courses offered in Puebla include: Mesoamérica, Culture and Society in Contemporary México, Folkloric Mexican Music, Mexican Drama, The Economy of México, Agriculture and Sustainability, Octavio Paz, Cultural Journalism, The History of Latin America, and The Mexican Revolution, among many others. For more information, see www.wellesley.edu/Spanish/Puebla.

First-Year Seminars


I. Language Courses (Offered Every Year)


IV. Advanced Courses


Cross-Referenced Course


The following courses may be taken for Hispanic Studies major crecit.  Please see the full course description under the department in which the course is listed. (Keep in mind only three courses taught in English may count toward the major).

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