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    Oberlin College
   
 
  Oct 20, 2017
 
 
    
Course Catalog 2017-2018

Classics


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Andrew Wilburn, Associate Professor of Classics, Chair
Benjamin T. Lee, Professor of Classics
Kirk W. Ormand, Professor of Classics
Christopher V. Trinacty, Assistant Professor of Classics
 

Introduction.

The cultures of ancient Greece and Rome have made a lasting impact on Western literature, philosophy, science, and the arts.  The study of these cultures within the broader context of the ancient Mediterranean has much to tell us about the relation of the past to the present, as well as about who we are in contemporary society.

The Classics Department offers courses in classical civilization that cover literature, history and society, as well as Greek and Roman contributions to philosophy, religion and government.  No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required for these courses.  Rather, we have designed these classes to provide a broad background for students interested in all areas of literary, humanistic, artistic, and historical study. 

A series of courses in Greek and Latin language and literature develops a deeper understanding of the works of ancient Greece and Rome and enables students to make independent judgments about ancient society through the study of source documents in their original languages.  The Classics Department provides introductory courses in ancient Greek and Latin to enable students to approach significant material as soon as possible.  Advanced seminars aim at close study of one or two ancient authors.

Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Exams

Students who have been enrolled in the AP or IB programs in high school will be assigned advanced placement in accordance with the results of the qualifying examinations.  A score of 4 or 5 on the AP Latin examination, or a 6 or 7 on the Latin IB Examination, is required for the award of college credit.  Students will need to show the chair a syllabus and samples of their work in Latin to determine what level of class they will place into at Oberlin.  Credits earned from the AP or IB exam do not count towards the required courses in the majors but will result in advanced placement.

Entry-Level Course Sequence Suggestions.

Students just beginning to approach the classics should begin with Classics 111 (Greek and Roman Epic), Classics 112 (Greek and Roman Drama), Classics 103 (History of Greece) or Classics 104 (History of Rome), or with Latin 101 or Greek 101. Students are encouraged to enroll in any language course for which they are qualified. All entering students who have studied Latin or Greek previously should consult with a member of the department before enrolling in any course in Latin or Greek.

Students with four years of secondary-school Latin (including Vergil) will ordinarily be eligible for Latin 201 (Cicero) offered in the first semester. Such students especially should consider beginning the study of Greek in the fall semester.

Students who have had less than three semesters of Latin will be advised to enroll in or audit Latin 101, or to devote a Winter Term to review in order that they may enroll in Latin 102. Well-motivated students have done the equivalent of Greek 101 or of Latin 101 during a Winter Term and have then participated successfully in Greek 102 or Latin 102 in the spring.

Students considering a major in Greek or Latin should include in their first year and second year programs four semesters of work in the language, Classics 111 (Greek and Roman Epic) or Classics 112 (Greek and Roman Drama), and either Classics 103 (History of Greece) or 104 (History of Rome). Students who plan to major in Classical Civilization should take Classics 111 or 112,  Classics 103 and 104, and two semesters of either Greek or Latin as early as possible. Early consultation with the Classics Department concerning proposed plans of study is advisable, particularly for those who contemplate spending part of the junior or senior year in Rome or in Athens.

Major


A major in classics can serve as the central focus of a widely ranging undergraduate curriculum since it includes many areas of human activity and creativity, and it has so served for students who have gone on to careers in medicine, law, writing, etc.

Classics as a major or as a component part of an interdisciplinary or double major is preprofessional training for those who intend to engage in research and teaching at the university or college level in such fields as classics, classical archeology, comparative literature, religion, linguistics, medieval studies, philosophy, and many others. An undergraduate major in classics in whole or in part is also preparation for those who intend to teach languages, literatures, or humanities in secondary schools. Interested students are advised to consult with the chairperson in devising a major or partial major program which will meet with their needs and desires. The majors are designed with a high degree of flexibility.

The Department of Classics offers three majors: Classical Civilization, Latin Language and Literature, and Greek Language and Literature.

  1. The major in Classical Civilization will include: one of two introductory literature courses (Classical Civilization 111 or 112); both Greek and Roman History (Classical Civilization 103 and 104); at least two courses in Greek or Latin, and lastly, six additional courses in Classics or “Related Courses.”  Among these must be at least one course in ancient Art and/or Archaeology, and at least one course on a relevant topic offered by another department (typically Art, English, History, Philosophy or Religion; courses from other departments may be substituted with the approval of the Chair.  See below for a list of approved related courses.) Additional courses in the ancient languages will also count towards these six additional courses, but credits for courses from the AP or IB exams will not count towards this requirement.

    Students with a preprofessional interest should select one of the majors below. Work in the other language and literature is strongly recommended. Attention is called to the possibility of a minor in the other language and literature (see below).

  2. The major in Latin Language and Literature will include: four courses in Latin above Latin 102; one of two introductory literature courses (Classical Civilization 111 or 112); and Roman History (Classical Civilization 104); and three additional courses in Classics or “Related Courses.”   Among these must be at least one course in ancient Art and/or Archaeology, and at least one course on a relevant topic offered by another department (typically Art, English, History, Philosophy or Religion; courses from other departments may be substituted with the approval of the Chair.  See below for list of approved related courses.)  Additional courses in the ancient languages will also count towards these three courses.  Credits for courses from the AP or IB exams will not count towards the 4 courses required in Latin above 102.
     
  3. The major in Greek Language and Literature will include: four courses in Greek above Greek 102; one of two introductory literature courses (Classical Civilization 111 or 112); Greek History (Classical Civilization 103), and three additional courses in Classics or “Related Courses.”   Among these must be at least one course in ancient Art and/or Archaeology, and at least one course on a relevant topic offered by another department (typically Art, English, History, Philosophy or Religion; courses from other departments may be substituted with the approval of the Chair.  See below for list of approved related courses.)   Additional courses in the ancient languages will also count towards these three courses.  Credits for courses from the AP exams will not count towards the 4 courses required in Greek above 102.

With the permission of the major advisor, appropriate courses from other departments in the College or from study away programs may be substituted for some of the above.

Courses in which a student has earned a letter grade lower than a C- or P cannot be used to fulfill the requirements of the major.

Minor


Students may receive a minor in Greek or Latin upon completion of approved programs of study. Such programs will consist of at least 5 courses in Classical Civilization, Greek Language and Literature, Latin Language and Literature, ancient philosophy, and classical art and archeology, and will ordinarily include Greek 202 or the equivalent for the minor in Greek and Latin 202 or the equivalent for the minor in Latin. Interested students are advised to consult the chair.

Honors


To be eligible for admission to the Honors Program, a student must have completed by the end of the junior year:

  1. Two 300-level courses in either Greek or Latin and at least the 102-level course in the other classical language; or one 300-level course in Greek and one 300-level course in Latin
  2. Classical Civilization 103 (Greek History) or 104 (Roman History)
  3. Classical Civilization 111 or 112, plus two more courses in Classical Civilization

The department may invite qualified students to apply at the end of their junior year, but would also welcome applications from interested majors. Admission is based on overall academic distinction and outstanding work within the department.

To be awarded Honors, a student must:

  1. Complete a major in Latin or Greek
  2. Complete satisfactorily in the junior or senior year, a reading list devised in consultation with a member of the department that includes primary (ancient) and secondary (critical, historical) readings; this reading list may be completed as part of a course
  3. Pass (at the level of B+ or better), at the end of the relevant semester in the junior or senior year, a written translation exam on the primary sources in Greek or Latin
  4. Complete satisfactorily a research project designed in consultation with members of the department
  5. Pass an oral examination on the reading list and research project.  (This examination may be conducted by an outside examiner, who would also pass judgement on the Honors project)

Students participating in the Honors Program should register for Greek or Latin 502 for four units of credit in the relevant semester in which the research paper is written.

Related Courses


The Classics Department normally awards major credit for selected courses with material related to Classical antiquity in the following departments and programs: Archaeology, Art, English, History, Philosophy, Politics, and Religion. Below is a list of courses that have been approved as related courses in recent years; other courses may be approved through consultation with the Chair.

Anthropology
Anth 203 Introduction to Archaeology

Archaeological Studies (no longer offered)
Achs 200 Archeological Field Course
Achs 250 Advanced Archeological Field Course

Art (no longer offered)
Arts 309 Egypt & Ancient Near East
Arts 311 Egyptian Art and Architecture
Arts 324 Story of Mediterranean Archeology
Arts 326 Technology of Greek and Roman Architecture
Arts 340 Greek Art and Architecture
Arts 365 Greek and Roman Painting
Arts 429 Greek Sanctuaries
Arts 465 Greek and Roman Sculpture

Comparative Literature
Cmpl 200 Introduction to Comparative Literature

English
Engl 293 Medieval and Renaissance Lyric
Engl 301 Chaucer
Engl 310 Early Medieval Literature: from Epic to Romance

History
Hist 101 Medieval and Early Modern European History
Hist 204 Medieval Intellectual History
Hist 303 Historical Consciousness in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Jewish Studies
Jwst 131 Jewish History from Biblical Antiquity to 1492
Jwst 205 Hebrew Bible in its Ancient Near Eastern Context
Jwst 208 New Testament and Christian Origins

Philosophy
Phil 215 Ancient Philosophy

Politics
Polt 231 European Political Theory: From Plato to Rousseau
Polt 235 Debating Democracy

Religion
Relg 102 Introduction to Religion: Roots of Religion in the Mediterranean World
Relg 202 The Book of Job and its History of Interpretation
Relg 205 Hebrew Bible in its Ancient Near Eastern Context
Relg 208 New Testament and Christian Origins
Relg 217 Christian Thought and Action: Early and Medieval
Relg 218 Christianity in the Late Medieval World: 1100-1600
Relg 317 Selected Topics in Medieval Christianity: Augustine of Hippo

Theater
Thea 252 Western Theater History I
 

The following courses from this list will be offered in 2016-2017.

Art/Archaeology Requirement


All majors are required to take at least one course in ancient Art or Archaeology. These may be courses at Oberlin or offered by various programs abroad. The following courses fulfill this requirement; others may be substituted with the approval of the Chair.

Anthropology

ANTH 203 Introduction to Archaeology

Archaeological Studies (no longer offered)

ACHS 200 Archeological Field Course
ACHS 250 Advanced Archeological Field Course

Art (no longer offered)

ARTS 309 The Ancient Near East
ARTS 311 Egyptian Art and Architectures
ARTS 324 Story of Mediterranean Archeology
ARTS 326 Technology of Greek and Roman Architecture
ARTS 340 Greek Art and Archaeology
ARTS 365 Greek and Roman Painting
ARTS 429 Greek Sanctuaries
ARTS 465 Greek and Roman Sculpture

Classics

CLAS 203 The City in Antiquity
CLAS 307 Roman Egypt: Art, Culture, History


The following courses from this list will be offered in 2016-2017:

Archaeology


Students interested in classical archaeology as a profession should note the availability of a concentration in Classical Archaeology in the Archaeological Studies program. This concentration requires both the relevant courses in classical art and archaeology and basic training in the classical languages and literatures. For further information, see the separate listing under Archaeological Studies above, or consult Professor Wilburn.

Study Abroad


Oberlin College is a participating member of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. A semester of study in Rome during the junior or senior year is available for qualified students majoring in the department, either at the Intercollegiate Center or other accredited Classics programs in Italy. There are also affiliated programs in Athens. Consult the chair for details.

Transfer of Credit


No more than half the hours credited toward the major may be granted for work at other recognized institutions.

Winter Term


The following faculty are particularly interested in sponsoring Winter Term projects as indicated. Professor Ormand: intensive beginning Greek; Professor Lee or Professor Trinacty, intensive beginning Latin; many other topics are also possible. 

The Martin Classical Lectures


The Martin Classical Lectures are delivered annually at Oberlin College by an eminent visiting scholar. Please contact the department chair, or see our web page for details about this year’s lectures.

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