Apr 14, 2021  
Course Catalog 2008-2009 
    
Course Catalog 2008-2009 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Oberlin College Courses


 
  
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    CHIN 301 - Advanced Chinese I


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, CD

    Third-year Chinese. This course aims to develop skills in reading, aural comprehension, speech, and writing. Vocabulary expansion and control of grammatical patterns are emphasized. Materials to be used include movies and screenplays, newspapers, and readings in expository prose. Conducted in Chinese.

     
    Instructor: K. Li
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 202 or consent of instructor.

  
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    CHIN 302 - Advanced Chinese II


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, CD

    Third-year Chinese. Continuation of Chinese 301. This course aims to develop skills in reading, aural comprehension, speech, and writing. Vocabulary expansion and control of grammatical patterns are emphasized. Materials to be used include movies and screenplays, newspapers, and readings in expository prose. Conducted in Chinese.
    Instructor: K. Li
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 301 or consent of instructor.
  
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    CHIN 305 - Introduction to Literary Chinese


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, CD

    An introduction to literary Chinese through readings selected from basic classical sources in philosophy, history and literature. Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: K. Li
  
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    CHIN 401 - Readings in Chinese Literature


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, CD

    Fourth-year Chinese. Readings from contemporary Chinese literature, discussions, and writing assignments will further develop advanced skills in Chinese. Conducted in Chinese.
    Instructor: Q. Ma
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 302 or consent of instructor.
  
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    CHIN 402 - Readings in Society, History and Contemporary Events


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, CD

    Fourth-year Chinese. Advanced skills in reading, writing, speaking and aural comprehension will be developed in this course through readings in expository prose, discussions and writing assignments. Conducted in Chinese.
    Instructor: Q. Ma
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 401 or consent of instructor.
  
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    CHIN 451 - Topics in Chinese Sources I


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 1.5 hours
    Attribute: 1.5HU, CD

    This advanced language course is designed for students who have completed 4th-year Chinese or the equivalent. It focuses particularly on reading and writing proficiency. Course materials are slected from authentic literature or historical/political essays with emphasis on deepening students’ comprehension of Chinese language, culture and society. Conducted in Chinese.
    Instructor: K. Li
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 402 or consent of instructor.
  
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    CHIN 452 - Topics in Chinese Sources II


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1.5 hours
    Attribute: 1.5HU, CD

    This advanced language course is designed for students who have completed 4th-year Chinese or the equivalent. It focuses particularly on reading and writing proficiency. Course materials are selected from authentic literature or historical/political essays with emphasis on deepening students’ comprehension of Chinese language, culture and society. Conducted in Chinese.
    Instructor: K. Li
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 451 or consent of instructor.
  
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    CHIN 500 - Capstone Project


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 0 hours
    Attribute: 0HU

    Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: H. Deppman, K. Li, F. Liu, Q. Ma
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: P/NP or CR/NE grading only.
  
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    CHIN 995 - Private Reading


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 0.5-3 hours
    Attribute: 0.5-3HU, CD

    Independent study of a Chinese subject beyond the range of catalog course offerings.
    Instructor: H. Deppman, K. Li, F. Liu, Q. Ma
  
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    CINE 101 - Form, Style and Meaning in Cinema


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU

    This course considers the cinema as a particular media form and explores issues and methods in cinema studies. The class focuses on questions of film form and style (narrative, editing, sound, framing, mise-en-scene) and introduces students to concepts in film history and theory (industry, auteurism, spectatorship, the star system, ideology, genre). Students develop a basic critical vocabulary for examining the cinema as an art form, an industry, and a system of culturally meaningful representation. Enrollment Limit: 45.
    Instructor: B. Doan
  
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    CINE 201 - Sound and Image Workshop


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU

    This workshop follows the idea that we may understand film by making as well as analyzing it. We will explore basic issues in cinema through hands-on experience, marrying critical study (How are movies structured and why? How do they affect audiences?) to production work (exercises and projects in cinematography, sound, mise-in-scene, and editing). In short, we will probe the broad question of how films generate meaning by composing with sounds and images. Serves as prerequisite for advanced production courses. Consent by instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Instructor: R. Brown-Orso, G. Pingree, B. Kashmere
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CINE 101.
  
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    CINE 244 - Masters Of World Cinema: Focus On Fellini


    Semester Offered: Second Semester, First Module
    Credits (Range): 2 hours
    Attribute: 2HU

    A critical analysis and discussion of Federico Fellini’s most celebrated films from his earlier films associated with post-war Italian neorealism to his internationally acclaimed baroque film fantasies of the 1950’s, 1960’s and 1970’s. Special emphasis will be placed on Fellini’s ambiguous relationship to Italy’s political left and neorealism and to the critical controversies surrounding his later films. The evolution of his distinctive and influential film style will be traced out in La Strada, Nights of Cabiria, La Dolce Vita, 8 1/2, Juliet of the Spirits, Amarcord and Intervista. Enrollment Limit: 40.
    Instructor: D. Goulding
  
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    CINE 245 - Masters Of World Cinema: Focus On Kieslowski


    Semester Offered: Second Semester, Second Module
    Credits (Range): 2 hours
    Attribute: 2HU

    One of the leading figures in East European cinema of the 1970’s and 1980’s, Krzysztof Kieslowski was closely associated with Poland’s Cinema of Moral Concern which helped give birth to the Solidarity movement and the collapse of Poland’s Communist regime. He later gained international critical acclaim for his 1990’s French/Polish co-produced film trilogy White, Blue, and Red. Kieslowski’s films receiving close critical attention include Blind Chance, the monumental Decalogue, and the tricolor trilogy, White, Blue and Red. Enrollment Limit: 40.
    Instructor: D. Goulding
  
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    CINE 260 - Approaches to Cinema: The Musical and American Film Culture


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4 HU, WR

    This course will offer an overview of the major historical periods, figures, and films of the musical genre, while also framing them within the broader historical, aesthetic and cultural moments out of which they arose. It will also explore how the musical’s unique blending of spectacle and narrative influenced other genres. We will concentrate primarily on American film musicals, although films from France and England, as well as stage productions, will also be included. Enrollment Limit: 30.
    Instructor: B. Doan
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the Cinema Studies Program section titled “Cinematic Traditions Courses.”

  
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    CINE 270 - Comics, Animation and American Film Culture


    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    English
    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 Hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    This class looks at the intersections of comics, animated films and live-action cinema in relationship to American film culture, and how all three forms offer their audiences a unique form of visual communication throughout the twentieth century. By thinking about these three forms in detail, we will also explore how what one artist has called “sequential literature” challenges paradigms of reading, and by extension, writing, criticism and theory. Enrollment Limit: 30.
    Instructor: B. Doan
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the Cinema Studies Program section titled “Cinematic Traditions Courses.”
  
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    CINE 299 - Persistence of Vision: Approaches to Cinema Studies


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    This course will explore a variety of approaches to cinema studies as a discipline, including issues involving production. In addition to close discussion of a variety of movies, theoretical and critical readings will include works on aesthetics and the nature of cinema, the history of cinema as an art form and an industry, and cultural and social issues in cinema studies. We will also pay close attention to the issue of writing about cinema. N.B. Cinema 299 is required of all Cinema Studies majors. Enrollment limit: 25.
    Instructor: W. P. Day
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: The prerequisite for Cine 299 is Cine 101 and a Cinematic Traditions course or consent of instructor.
  
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    CINE 301 - Sound and Image Workshop II


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU

    This is a studio production course in multimedia performance This workshop will incorporate video, sound, music, movement and installation. We will examine closely themes of myth and ritual through the art making practice. We will look closely at the work of Meredith Monk, Bill Viola, John Cage, Maya Deren and others. We will be engaging in a variety of high- and low-tech media, both analog and digital will be employed in the development of series of projects and performances. Public presentations of the various stages of development will take place throughout the semester including the premiere of a final public presentation at the end of the semester. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Instructor: R. Brown-Orso
  
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    CINE 320 - Documentary Production


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    The Second Semester offering of this course is canceled.

    This course explores documentary form in both critical and creative ways. The class introduces students to various ways to think about and understand documentaries (in terms of structure, purpose, audience, etc.) and then gives them the opportunity to practice basic documentary production (camera, lighting, sound, non-linear editing). After engaging in various individual and small group exercises, students spend the balance of the semester working together to produce a short documentary video. Consent by instructor required. Enrollment limit: 12.
    Instructor: G. Pingree
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the Cinema Studies Program section titled “Advanced Cinema Studies Courses.”

  
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    CINE 322 - Advanced Media Production


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU

    The course aims to activate and amplify students’ creativity, and to stir passion for time-based media that transcend mainstream conventions. Students will be introduced to specialized production methods and techniques and post-production strategies; produce short experiments and exercises; and complete an individual studio project. Students will be exposed to a wide range of contemporary screen practices and hybrid forms, including the essay-film, auto-ethnography, abstract cinema, audiovisual collage, installation, speculative biography, animation, and experimental documentary. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment limit: 12.
    Instructor: R. Brown-Orso
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the Cinema Studies Program section titled “Advanced Cinema Studies Courses.”
  
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    CINE 323 - Exhibition Practices in the Media Arts


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 Hours
    Attribute: 4 HU

    This course will introduce students to the methods, procedures, and decision-making processes of media art exhibition, providing an overview of curatorial practice within the stricter context of independent, short-format film and video. This will include a consideration of the critical, conceptual, and logistical aspects of curating. Throughout the semester, students will be responsible for designing and programming a weekly micro-cinema in the Oberlin community. Exhibition and festival case studies will also be examined. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Instructor: B. Kashmere
    Prerequisites & Notes
    For complete prerequisites, please refer to the Cinema Studies Program section titled “Advanced Cinema Studies Courses.”
  
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    CINE 324 - Production Workshop: The Short


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU

    The short film is a distinct form, with its own limits and possibilities. Put another way, short films, whether fiction, non-fiction, or experimental, are not simply reduced versions of feature-length films. In this advanced production workshop, students will consider the Short in its historical, formal, and industrial contexts, but mostly they will practice the art of conceiving, producing, and exhibiting short films. Consent of the instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Instructor: G. Pingree
    Prerequisites & Notes
    CINE 201 or an equivalent introductory production course and consent of instructor.
  
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    CINE 350 - French Non-Fiction Film


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, CD, WR

    This course addresses documentary and ethnographic cinema from France, from the invention of the Lumière cinématographe in 1896 to digital filmmaking at the beginning of the 21st century.  As we study nature documentaries, early city symphonies, films made in the name of ethnology and anthropology, war documentaries, and biographical and autobiographical films, we will investigate the structures, techniques, and ideologies that identify these practices as non-fictional, and, when applicable, uncover their poeticity and artifice, particularly in narrative films that play with these representational strategies and test the limits of claims to truth and/or objectivity.  Conducted in English.  Enrollment limit: 25.
    Instructor: G. An
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: FREN/CINE 250 or CINE 101.
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with FREN 350.
  
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    CINE 368 - Movies and Melodrama


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    This course explores the history, cultural contexts, and critical challenges of melodramatic narrative cinema. We’ll study the genre’s origins, the rise and fall of its prestige, its identification as a “feminine” form, its adaptation to different historical and cultural contexts, and its contemporary challenges to cultural analysis. Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Instructor: B. Doan
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the Cinema Studies Program section titled “Advanced Cinema Studies Courses.”
  
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    CINE 376 - Screening Spirituality


    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    ENGL
    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    Cinema is perennially concerned with the challenge of representing extraordinary experiences. Filmmakers and critics return repeatedly to the medium’s capacity to evoke a profound sense of reality despite reason’s doubts regarding the status of the represented world. We’ll investigate selected treatments of the extraordinary and the challenges they present to critical theory and practice.  Enrollment limit: 25.


    This course also counts towards the English major for American, Post-1900.
    Instructor: J. Pence
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the Cinema Studies Program section titled ‘Advanced Cinema Studies Courses.’

  
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    CINE 382 - Documentary Workshop


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 Hours
    Attribute: 4 HU

    New Course added 11.07.2008.

    This course explores documentary form in both critical and creative ways, with an emphasis on nontraditional approaches. In this class we will question the role of the script and examine the function of research; recognizing improvisation as central to the process of filming, and writing as montage. Alternative modes (personal essay, web documentary) will be investigated. Class time will revolve around screenings, discussion, presentations, and critiques; each student is required to complete an individual project. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment limit: 12.
    Instructor: B. Kashmere
    Prerequisites & Notes
    For complete prerequisites, please refer to the Cinema Studies Program section titled “Advanced Cinema Studies Courses.”

  
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    CINE 399 - Cinema Studies Practicum


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1-3 hours
    Attribute: 1-3HU

    The First Semester offering of this course is canceled.

    This course allows qualified students to pursue independent projects in documentary work and other types of production within the collaborative context of a practicum. In order to be admitted to the practicum, students must demonstrate previous production training and experience (through Oberlin College production courses, Ex-co courses, or independent internships or employment experiences), submit specific and feasible project proposals, and receive permission from the instructor. Students will develop projects in consultation with the instructor and work in small groups to provide each other critical and technical support. Consent of the instructor is required. Enrollment Limit: 15.
    Instructor: R. Brown-Orso
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites:  For complete prerequisites, please refer to the Cinema Studies Program section titled “Advanced Cinema Studies Courses.”

  
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    CINE 498 - Senior Tutorial


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1-4 hours
    Attribute: 1-4HU, WR

    Students should consult with the Director of the Program about arranging a Senior Tutorial.  Consent of instructor required.  Enrollment limit: 9.
    Instructor: G. An, R. Brown, W.P. Day, B. Doan, B. Kashmere, J. Pence, J. Pingree

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission based on a completed application form (available at Program office).
  
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    CINE 499 - Honors Project


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1-4 hours
    Attribute: 1-4HU, WR

    Honors in Cionema Studies is only open to invited students who have been admitted through the application process.  Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: J. Pence
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite:  Admission based on a completed application form (available at Program office).
  
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    CINE 995 - Private Reading


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 0.5-3 hours
    Attribute: 0.5-3HU

    Signed permission of the instructor required.
    Instructor: G. An, R. Brown-Orso, W. P. Day, B. Doan, E. Hamilton, J. Pence, G. Pingree
  
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    CLAS 101 - Homer’s Iliad and the Myths of Tragedy


    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    THEA
    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, WR

    Critical study of Homer’s Iliad, the First example of the tragic perspective in western literature, selected tragic dramas by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, and Shakespeare, and some modern films. Attention to how the view of human experience established in these works serves to reflect and comment upon recurring themes in western civilization. Lecture and discussion. Enrollment Limit: 60.
    Instructor: T. Van Nortwick
  
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    CLAS 103 - History of Greece


    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Law and Society

    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3SS

    An introduction to Greek history, from the prehistoric period to the rise of Rome. Special emphasis will be given to the study of the ancient sources, especially Herodotus and Thucydides, as we attempt to reconstruct the political, social, and constitutional history of this tremendously vital period. Offered in alternate years. Enrollment Limit: 55.
    Instructor: A. Wilburn
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: May count toward a history major.
  
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    CLAS 104 - History of Rome


    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Law and Society
    Next Offered: 2009-2010
    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    Attribute: 3 SS

    This course will provide a survey of the history of Rome, from its prehistoric origins to its “decline and fall” in the fifth century A.D. Attention will be given to the evolution of Roman social and political structures, Roman imperialism, and the transition from paganism to Christianity. Readings from the ancient sources will provide the basis for discussions. Enrollment Limit: 55.
    Instructor: A. Wilburn
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: May count toward a History major.
     
  
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    CLAS 201 - Magic & Mystery Ancient World


    Next Offered: 2009-2010
    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    Attribute: 3 SS

    This course surveys the evidence for magic and the occult in antiquity, focusing on the traditions of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Topics covered include theoretical approaches to magic, practitioners (witches, sorcerers, and priests), magical objects (curse tablets, voodoo dolls, and amulets), magical words (spells and prayers), ancient mystery cults, and the interaction between early Christianity and magic. Special attention will be paid to how ancient individuals interacted with the unseen world in their daily lives, and when and how they employed the services of professional magicians. Readings of ancient sources in translation and classroom discussion. Enrollment limit: 55.
    Instructor: A. Wilburn
  
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    CLAS 203 - The City in Antiquity


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3SS

    Urban centers have been important aspects of human life for more than 5000 years, and the city played a central role in the development of Greek and Roman society. This course will investigate the function of the city in classical antiquity by studying a number of urban centers, including Mycenae, Athens, Alexandria, Pergamon, Rome, Pompeii, Palmyra and Constantinople. Topics will include the urban plan, monumental architecture, domestic space, and social interaction. Studies of architectural and archaeological remains will be complemented by readings of ancient sources in translation.
    Instructor: A. Wilburn
  
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    CLAS 210 - Greek and Roman Mythology


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, WR

    Introduction to the major myths of ancient Greece and Rome and their adaptation by later Western culture. Study of the idea and function of myth, with introductions to some of the most important schools of interpretation: psychoanalysis, structuralism, and semiotics. Some attention to the representation of classical myth in the visual arts, especially in the collection of the Allen Art Museum. Enrollment Limit: 60.
    Instructor: K. Ormand
  
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    CLAS 219 - Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome


    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    GSFS
    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, WR

    Study of the construction of gender and sexual identities in ancient Greece and Rome. Emphasis will be on primary texts that demonstrate notions of sexual practice and/or identity, such as Aristophanes’ Thesmophoriazousae, Plato’s Symposium, Lucian’s Dialogue of the Courtesans, Aeschines’ Against Timarchos, Catullus, Martial, Juvenal. We will also read modern critical theorists (Foucault, Halperin, Richlin, Rubin), and will interrogate the accuracy of their arguments. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 30.
    Instructor: K. Ormand
  
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    CLAS 304 - Sophoclean Tragedy


    Next Offered: 2009-2010
    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    Attribute: 3 HU, WR

    In-depth study, in translation, of the seven surviving tragedies of Sophocles. Careful consideration of these plays as individual realizations, in the context of Fifth Century Athenian culture, of Greek heroic ideals. Close reading of primary texts as well as Secondary critical and theoretical studies. Discussion and occasional student reports. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Instructor: T. Van Nortwick
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CLAS 206 or CLAS 101.
  
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    CLAS 309 - The Ancient & Modern Novel


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU

    This course will take as its point of departure the surviving novels of Greek and Roman antiquity. We will read a selection of Greek novels, as well as Petronius’ Satyricon and Apuleius’ Metamorphoses. To these ancient works we will compare a series of modern novels, especially Epitaph of a Small Winner by Machado de Assis and Kennedy’s Confederacy of Dunces. The course will also pursue critical and theoretical issues regarding the genre of the novel raised by Bakhtin, Lukacs, Winkler and others. All works will be read in translation.
    Instructor: B. Lee
  
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    CLAS 501 - Senior Project


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3-6 hours
    Attribute: 3-6HU

    Intensive work on a topic selected in consultation with a member of the department, culminating in a presentation of a paper or other project. Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: B. Lee, K. Ormand, T. Van Nortwick, A. Wilburn
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: Senior major standing and invitation of the department.
  
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    CLAS 502 - Senior Project


    Semester Offered: First and Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 2 - 3 hours
    Attribute: 2-3 HU


     
    Instructor: B. Lee, K. Ormand, T. Van Nortwick, A. Wilburn

  
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    CLAS 995 - Private Reading


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 0.5-3 hours
    Attribute: 0.5-3HU

    Signed permission of the instructor is required.
    Instructor: B. Lee, K. Ormand, T. Van Nortwick, A. Wilburn
  
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    CMPL 200 - Introduction to Comparative Literature


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WR

    What kinds of theoretical models are valid for grounding literary comparisons across history, place, language, nation, culture, genre and medium? Texts from several literary traditions will be used to answer that question and explore topics in theory, translation, East-West comparison, and literature and the other arts. Enrollment limit: 25.
    Instructor: Staff, R. Watkins
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: Comparative Literature majors should take this course by the junior year.
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 275.
  
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    CMPL 250 - Writing America: Comparative Immigrant Narratives


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 4
    Attribute: 4 HU, CD, WP

    New Course Added 05.26.08.

    Who are you, where are you from, and how did you get here? This course compares 20th and 21st century stories of uprooting, passage, and arrival to America. Emphasis will be placed on the ways immigrants from around the world negotiate race, gender, sexuality, language, and cultural history as they construct images of themselves and the U.S. Attention will be given to illegal immigration, citizenship, and the criminalization of immigrants. Authors may include Leo Rosten, Gish Jen, Eva Hoffman, Bharati Mukherjee, and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha.  Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Instructor: J. Pas
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 250

  
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    CMPL 338 - Tango: A Cultural History


    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Dance
    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, CD

    This course examines the social, political, and aesthetic dimensions of tango. By looking at dance, music, lyrics and other tango manifestations, students will explore how communities encode their traditional values in expressive forms, how these forms operate subversively in popular culture, and how they officially represent the nation. Films, recordings, and printed documents complement the readings in this course, as will guest speakers. Includes the option of a dance or music practicum. Taught in Spanish. Enrollment limit: 20.
    Instructor: A. Cara
    Prerequisites & Notes
    HISP 304 or equivalent.
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with HISP 338.
  
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    CMPL 350 - Translation Workshop


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    Major writers in modern and contemporary poetry and some classical examples studied by translating them into effective American English. Exercises and assignments in the first half will help students focus on a project of their own design in the second half. Guest appearances by local and visiting writers. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 16.
    Instructor: M. Ali
    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course has no prerequisites, but some knowledge of a foreign language and some experience in writing poetry are required. Admission is based on a completed application form and writing sample.
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with CRWR 350.
  
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    CMPL 351 - Traduttore, Traditore: Theory and Practice of Translation


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 Hours
    Attribute: 4 HU, WR, CD

    How do we translate? What is a good translation? What skills are involved in translation? To answer these questions, we will consider the work of Susan Bassnett, Lawrence Venuti, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Abraham Cahan, and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, among others. You will become familiar with theories of translation as you learn to apply these theories to your own work. Knowledge of a foreign language is required. Enrollment Limit: 15.
    Instructor: J. Pas
  
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    CMPL 358 - Literature and Philosophy


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    This course is canceled for 2009.

    Ever since Plato, one branch of philosophy has scorned literary writing as too ornamental or irrational while another has admired its narrative, descriptive, and figural powers. Creative writers have similarly treated philosophers as inferior or superior ‘others.’ Why does each need the other as a necessary foil? This course surveys key positions, interpretations, and constructions on both sides of this contested relationship and emphasizes contemporary possibilities for collaboration and conversation. Prerequisites and Notes Two 200-level courses, including at least one Gateway course; or three 200-level courses.
    Instructor: J. Deppman
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 358.

  
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    CMPL 370 - Itineraries of Postmodernism


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WR

    This course explores the roots of postmodernism in European literature and philosophy. Theorists include Derrida on poststructuralism, Nancy on myth, Barthes and Foucault on authorial agency, Vattimo on the transparent society, and Spivak on the subaltern. Literary texts have been chosen for their importance in the modernist-postmodernist trajectory and their complex responsiveness, both formal and thematic, to defining issues of postmodernism. Authors may include Kafka, Duras, O’Brien, Bataille. Enrollment limit: 25.
    Instructor: P. O’Connor
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: A literature course in any language.

    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 370.
  
  •  

    CMPL 372 - Contemporary Literary Theory


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    This course is about developments in literary theory in the context of the last 35 years of American intellectual and artistic culture. Our concern will be understanding literary theories in their historical and institutional contexts as well as considering their value as ways of thinking about literature and art. We’ll pay particular attention to the impact of post-structuralism on American critics, the relation of literary criticism to cultural criticism, and various elaborations of the idea of post-modernity. Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Instructor: W. P. Day
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Two 200-level courses, including at least one Gateway course; or three 200-level courses.
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 372
  
  •  

    CMPL 381 - European Modernism & World


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WR

    This course is canceled effective 08.26.08.

    Between 1880 and 1930, Europe was convulsed by wars, technological advances, and social transformations of all kinds. Writers and artists responded by creating revolutionary new forms, techniques, and movements like Cubism, Futurism, Dadaism, and Surrealism. Strains of Modernism then carried philosophical, political, and aesthetic models across the 20th-century world. We will study why and how non-European authors received, rejected, and/or recombined central aspects of European Modernism. Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Instructor: J. Deppman
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 381

  
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    CMPL 400 - Senior Capstone


    Semester Offered: First and Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    Attribute: 3 HU, CD

    Senior Capstone Project for CMPL majors.
    Instructor: S. Faber, M. Senior
  
  •  

    CMPL 457 - Caribbean Cultures and Literatures


    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    LATS
    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, CD

    This course examines the relationship between literature and folklore in the Francophone, Anglophone, Spanish-speaking and Dutch Caribbean. Central issues include: the creolization of cultures and presence of a creole aesthetic in literature and the traditional arts (music, dance, theater, painting, etc.), the relationship of colonialism and tourism to cultural productions, the re-writing of ‘master texts’ from the Western canon, the dialogue between oral and written literatures, and the literary re-writings of history. Taught in English. Enrollment Limit: 15.
    Instructor: A. Cara
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with HISP 457.
  
  •  

    CMPL 474 - La Chine et le Japon dans l’imaginaire francais


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU, CD

    In this course students will examine French representations of East Asia from the late 19th century to the present. Through close readings of films, paintings, comic books, and literary texts, students will expand their sense of the visual/verbal literacy with which one ‘reads culture’ through these different literary and artistic media. Topics addressed will include ‘chinoiseries’ and ‘japonisme,’ literary exoticism, French Maoism, travel literature, war documentaries, and the challenges of cross-cultural exchange. Taught in French.
    Instructor: G. An
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prequisites: Two courses at the 300-level beyond 301
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with FREN 419
  
  •  

    CMPL 501 - Honors Project


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU

    Consent of Program Director required.
    Instructor: J. Deppman
  
  •  

    CMPL 502 - Honors Project


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU

    Consent of Program Director required.
    Instructor: J. Deppman
  
  •  

    CMPL 995 - Private Reading


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1-3 hours
    Attribute: 1-3HU

    Independent study of a subject beyond the range of catalog course offerings. Signed permission of the instructor is required.
    Instructor: J. Deppman
  
  •  

    CMUS 100 - Introduction to Western Art Music


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    Attribute: 3 HU

    A survey of Western music of the last 1000 years, with emphasis on new music and on concert life today. Focus throughout the course is twofold: on cultural context, past and present, that lends music its vitality; and on the development of various listening strategies. Enrollment Limit: 40.
    Instructor: Staff
    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course (or MHST 101) is a prerequisite for all Music History survey courses (226, 235, 245, 255, 275).
    No previous musical training is required.
    Open to College of Arts and Sciences students only.

  
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    CMUS 103 - Introduction to Musics of the World


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    Attribute: 3 HU, CD

    This course examines music as an inherently social act, illustrating how music is informed by - and conversely informs - historical, political, cultural, and economic processes. Using selected case studies from around the world, we will examine music in both historical and contemporary contexts and encounter musical styles ranging from indigenous practices to classical traditions and pop genres. We will pay particular attention to the transformation of sounds and their meaning resulting from colonialism, nationalism, technological innovations, and/or the expansion of trans-national music markets. The course material will also address issues of cultural representation; how recordings, articles, web, and video material frame the discussion or presentation of music. At the same time, we will explore the variety of ways these musics are structured and develop critical listening skills. In some cases, we will learn to perform the practices we are studying. Enrollment Limit: 45
    Instructor: J. Fraser
    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course does not presume prior knowledge of music.
    (See ETHN 100 as a comparable course for the musically experienced.)
  
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    CMUS 105 - Music in the Digital Dystopia


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    In Brave New World, Aldous Huxley foresees a dystopic world in which entertainment is the primary mode of discourse. The deluge of pleasures and thrills fundamentally alters the way that people perceive and experience the world around them. According to Huxley, enjoyment replaces thinking. Some have argued that this Huxleyan dystopia has been realized through the various entertainment technologies developed during the post-World War II era. Whether or not we are indeed living in a dystopic musical world, the digital revolution of the last three decades has fundamentally changed the nature of musical performance, consumption, and perception. This course examines the ways in which new recording and communications technologies have reshaped our musical experiences.
    Instructor: C. Roust
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 30
  
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    CMUS 400 - Senior Honors


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    Attribute: 3 HU

    TBA
    Instructor: Staff

  
  •  

    CMUS 401 - Senior Honors


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    Attribute: 3 HU

    TBA
    Instructor: Staff

  
  •  

    CNST 130 - Phys Wellnss Musician’s Life


    Semester Offered: First and Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1 Hour
    The musician’s body and its state of physical health has a strong influence on his or her ability to play or sing. This course will emphasize physical restructuring, as well as practical methods for maintaining balanced physical health. Students will develop an increased understanding of the body’s physical and muscular structures and its movement principles. Their everyday postural habits will be evaluated and corrective patterns explored. This is a practical course, with daily lab components which will allow the information to be integrated into their bodies, setting the foundation for physical health, and decreasing the possibility of injuries. Enrollment Limit 15
    Instructor: D. Vogel
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note:

    P/NP or CR/NE only.

  
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    CNST 150 - Introduction Piano Technology


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    Introductory course in equal temperament tuning theory and application, piano nomenclature, basic piano repairs and modern action regulation. Introduction oto piano building materials and an overview of modern piano construction. Combination of lectures and hands-on shop training. Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: J. Cavanaugh
  
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    CNST 151 - Intermediate Piano Technology


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3
    The class starts with a week-long review of equal temperament and action regulation/repair review. Students then focus on developing their  tuning skills, with respect to accuracy and speed, and turning the action regulation theory they were taught in the Intro course into practical skills as action technicians in the workshop. As the course nears its end, students will be introduced to the art of building and regulating tone in Steinway hammers.
    Instructor: J. Cavanaugh
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CNST 150
    Limit 8
    Consent of Intructor required.
  
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    CNST 160 - Digital Audio Skills


    Semester Offered: Second Semester, First Module
    Credits (Range): 1 Hour
    This course educates student musicians about the practical aspects of recording, editing, and distributing their music. 
    Students who complete the course will acquire the following skills:
     • choosing microphones appropriate to their instrument(s)
     • operating an audio recording device of CD-quality
     • transferring their recording to computer
     • editing their recording with computer software
     • saving their finished recording in a format for distribution (CD and/or MP3 file)
    Students will learn primarily through hands-on experience.  Each component of the course will include a technical
    introduction with written materials and practical experience with hands-on exercises.
    Instructor: T. Lopez
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of Instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 18

  
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    CNST 161 - Music Notation Software


    Semester Offered: Second Semester, Second Module
    Credits (Range): 1 Hour
    The two most popular programs for music notation are currently Finale and Sibelius.  They are both very powerful,
    complex, and require a substantial learning curve.  This course provides a directed learning experience with both
    programs.  Students who complete the course will acquire the following skills in both Finale and Sibelius:
     • formatting staves for solo instruments, voice, and small and large ensembles
     • formatting notation for use by performers and as study scores
     • utilizing musical symbols for traditional and non-traditional notation
     • extracting instrumental parts from a score
     • saving their finished recording in a format for distribution (printed and PDF)
    Students will learn primarily through hands-on experience.  Each component of the course will include a introduction
    with score materials and practical experience with hands-on exercises.
    Instructor: T. Lopez
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of Instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 18
  
  •  

    CNST 200 - Prof Development for the Freelance Artist


    Next Offered: Title and description update Spring 2008
    Semester Offered: First and Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1 Hours
    A semester-long course that will examine the many aspects of a freelance artist’s career. The purpose of this course is to introduce the techniques necessary to survive in the business of hte Arts. Skills such as: marketing, negotiating, entrepreneurship, writing, networking and business skills will be studied. Specialists in the various fields will be invited to the class to speak about their own professional experience. Each student will conduct an informational interview, present a press book or portfolio and set up a personal Web page.
    Instructor: K. Chastain
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 25.
  
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    COMP 100 - The Craft of Composition


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 2 Hours
    A course designed for students not majoring in composition. The purpose of the course is to provide those with limited prior background in composition the opportunity to experience musical structure and coherence through writing. The class meets as a group but the compositional problems of each individual will receive attention as needed.
    Instructor: Staff
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 10.
    Prerequisite: MUTH 232
    Note: May be repeated for credit
  
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    COMP 201 - Composition Class I


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    A course designed for composition majors, composition minors, or College music majors with composition emphasis. Units include study of notation, techniques of composition, improvisation, free composition.
    Instructor: Staff
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Composition major, composition minor, or a College music major with emphasis in composition required.
  
  •  

    COMP 202 - Composition Class II


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    A course designed for composition majors, composition minors, or College music majors with composition emphasis. Units include study of notation, techniques of composition, improvisation, free composition.
    Instructor: Staff
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Composition major, composition minor, or a College music major with emphasis in composition required.
    Prerequisite: COMP 201
    Enrollment Limit: 12.
  
  •  

    COMP 203 - Orchestration


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    The purpose is to develop facility in writing for various instrumental combinations. The study includes: comparison of techniques of orchestration (18th-20th centuries), practice writing and arranging for the different choirs of the modern orchestra, orchestrating complete compositions; the graphic aspect of and notational problems in more recent music.
    Instructor: Staff
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Prerequisites: MUTH 232; COMP 202
    Junior status as a composition major or minor (or College music major, composition emphasis).
    Primarily for composition majors.

  
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    COMP 204 - New Music Workshop


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    A workshop for performers and composers centered around continuing collaborations. Topics will include conventional and extended instrumental techniques, scoring, notation, performance, and compositional issues. Composers will be given regular writing assignments ranging in degrees of constraint in terms of scope and instrumentation. There will be numerous opportunities for contact between faculty and student. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 30.
    Instructor: Staff
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMP 203

    Note: The course may be repeated for credit up to a maximum of eight credits
    It may be taken once in place of  TECH 350

  
  •  

    COMP 350 - Composition Seminar


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    A one-semester course designed for composition students. The semester is divided into two units of six (or seven) weeks. A variety of activities germane to the development of composers are included, such as the analysis and discussion of music by guest composers; open rehearsal-discussions; score-reading sessions; visitors from other creative arts areas on campus; outside readings in criticism and aesthetics.
    Instructor: Staff
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMP 204.
    Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Note: May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    CRWR 110 - Technique and Form in Poetry


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU

    Extensive reading of published poetry from a creative writing perspective. Writing includes weekly exercises aimed at exploring the various techniques of poetry used in the assigned reading. In-class discussion of both assigned reading and student exercises. Two sections. Enrollment Limit: 25 (18 places reserved for first-year students, 7 for sophomores).
    Instructor: A. Giannelli
  
  •  

    CRWR 120 - Technique and Form in Fiction


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3HU

    Extensive reading of published fiction from a creative writing perspective. Writing includes weekly exercises aimed at exploring the various techniques of fiction used in the assigned reading. In-class discussion of both assigned reading and student exercises. Two sections. Enrollment Limit: 25 (reserved for first-year students).
    Instructor: C. Johnson, S. Watanabe
  
  •  

    CRWR 201 - Poetry/Prose Workshop


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    The reading and writing of poetry, short fiction, and some drama. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Instructor: P. Alexander, M. Ali, B. Matambo, S. Watanabe
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Students must submit a completed application form and a typed sample of recent work, preferably in at least two genres.  Please see the department for more information about admission materials. Note: Not open to first-semester first-year students and seniors; juniors discouraged; some second-semester first-year students will be admitted.
  
  •  

    CRWR 220 - Writing Short Fiction


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 Hours
    Attribute: 3HU

    A course in writing short fiction for upper division (3rd and 4th year) non-Creative Writing majors. Counts toward the English concentration in creative writing. Application required.  Enrollment limit: 15.
    Instructor: B. Matambo
  
  •  

    CRWR 237 - Geographies of Displacement


    Semester Offered: Second Semester, Second Module
    Credits (Range): 2 Hours
    Attribute: 2 HU

    New Course Added 11.09.2008.

    This course will map the extra-literary contexts around the trope of displacement in the work of indigenous writers, scholars, and social activists from South Africa, Tibet, and the Lakota Nation. During the third week, April 13-20, writers and scholars will give public talks and meet with students, including writer and social critic Njabulo Ndebele (South Africa); poet Tsering Wangmo Dhompa (exile from Tibet); and tribal historians and activists Waste’Win and Phyllis Young (Standing Rock Sioux). Important: Students should keep their evenings open during the third week for meetings with the writers. A response paper or creative project will be due at the end of the course. Consent of the instructor is required. Enrollment Limit: 30.
    Instructor: S. Watanabe

  
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    CRWR 245 - Writing About Nature


    Semester Offered: Second Semester, First Module
    Credits (Range): 2 hour
    Attribute: 2 HU

    Reading of modern and contemporary authors on nature and the environment; weekly writing. Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: P. Alexander
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Admission based on a completed application form and writing sample. Please see the department for more information about admission materials.
  
  •  

    CRWR 310 - Poetry Workshop


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    The writing of poetry. Intensive discussion of student work, accompanied by assigned reading. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Instructor: M. Ali, P. Alexander
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CRWR 201. Admission based on a completed application form and a writing sample of six to eight poems. Please see the department for more information about admission materials.
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 395.
  
  •  

    CRWR 320 - Fiction Workshop


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    The writing of short fiction. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Instructor: C. Johnson
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CRWR 201. Admission based on a completed application form and a writing sample of at least 12 pages of fiction, made up of at least two separate pieces. Please see the department for more information about admission materials.
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 397.
  
  •  

    CRWR 330 - Playwriting Workshop


    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Theater
    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    A workshop focused on discussion of student work and on selected examples from modern and contemporary drama, working toward a staged reading of an original one-act play. The course presupposes considerable knowledge of drama. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Instructor: D. Walker
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Admission based on a completed application form and writing sample. Please see the department for more information about admission materials.
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 398.
  
  •  

    CRWR 331 - Playwriting Lab


    Semester Offered: Second Semester, Second Module
    Credits (Range): 1 hours
    Attribute: 1HU

    For actors who are available to students in the playwriting class; to try out work in progress and be available for any productions that result. Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: D. Walker
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: CR/NE or P/NP grading. See CRWR 330.
  
  •  

    CRWR 340 - Nonfiction Workshop


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, WR

    The writing of personal narratives which employ the techniques of both the traditional essay and fiction with an emphasis on nonfiction as a literary art form. Extensive reading in a variety of nonfiction genres. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Instructor: B. Matambo
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Recommended preparation: CRWR 201. Admission based on a completed application and writing sample. Please see the department for more information about admission materials.
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 396.
  
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    CRWR 350 - Translation Workshop


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    Major writers in modern and contemporary poetry and some classical examples studied by translating them into effective American English. Exercises and assignments in the first half will help students focus on a project of their own design in the second half. Guest appearances by local and visiting writers. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Instructor: M. Ali
    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course has no prerequisites, but some knowledge of a foreign language and some experience in writing poetry are required. Admission is based on a completed application form and writing sample.  Please see the department for more information about admission materials. 
    Cross List Information
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 350.
  
  •  

    CRWR 370 - Special Topics and Genres in Creative Writing


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 2-4 HU

    A workshop course in special topics (such as prosody or line editing) and genres (such as experimental poetry, the novella, or children’s literature) not offered as part of the core Creative Writing curriculum. 

    Specific course content will vary. Please check the program website for details. A hardcopy of the course description will also be posted on the bulletin board outside the program office. Enrollment limit: 12.
    Instructor: S. Watanabe
    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRWR 201, major status, application only. Please see the department for more information about admission materials.

  
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    CRWR 470 - Advanced Writing Project I


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1-4 hours
    Attribute: 1-4HU

    Students will work individually with an instructor in a single genre. Majors should have completed at least two and preferably three of their required 300-level workshops before applying. Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: P. Alexander, M. Ali, D. Chaon, J. Deppman, A. Giannelli, J. Grim, D. Harrison, J. Hobbs, C. Jackson-Smith, C. Johnson, W. Liu, B. Matambo, P. Moser, A. Osanloo, T. Scholl, C. Tufts, T. Van Nortwick, D. Walker, S. Watanabe
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Please see the department for more information about admission materials.  Prerequisites: Workshop in the genre of specialization (i.e. poetry, fiction, nonfiction, playwriting, translation or screenwriting).
  
  •  

    CRWR 475 - Reading for Writing


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1-2 hours
    Attribute: 1-2HU

    This course may be taken in conjunction with an advanced project; it is not a substitute for required literature courses, and it is not a private reading. Upon consulting with a faculty sponsor, students will select a reading list and formulate an appropriate method of responding to their reading. Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: P. Alexander, M. Ali, D. Chaon, J. Deppman, A. Giannelli, J. Grim, D. Harrison, J. Hobbs, C. Jackson-Smith, C. Johnson, W. Liu, B. Matambo, P. Moser, A. Osanloo, T. Scholl, C. Tufts, T. Van Nortwick, D. Walker, S. Watanabe
  
  •  

    CRWR 480 - Advanced Writing Project II


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1-4 hours
    Attribute: 1-4HU, WR

    Students will work individually with an instructor in a single genre. Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: M. Ali, D. Chaon, J. Deppman, A. Giannelli, J. Grim, D. Harrison, J. Hobbs, C. Jackson-Smith, C. Johnson, E. Lepucki, W. Liu, B. Matambo, P. Moser, A. Onsanloo, T. Scholl, C. Tufts, T. Van Nortwick, D. Walker, S. Watanabe, D. Young
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Please see the department for more information about admission materials. Prerequisite: Advanced Writing Project I in the same genre.
  
  •  

    CRWR 485 - Practicum


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 1-2 hours
    Attribute: 1-2HU

    This course is open to students who are interested in acquiring practical, writing-related skills by working on a literary journal, organizing a reading series, editing a student anthology, assisting with introductory Creative Writing courses, organizing community- or campus-based workshops, helping out with the Creative Writing Student Co-op, or working on other program approved projects. Students can earn a maximum of three (four) credit hours toward the major. Consent of instructor required.
    Instructor: S. Watanabe
    Prerequisites & Notes
     Please see the department for more information about admission materials.
  
  •  

    CSCI 100 - The Internet and Beyond


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3NS

    A hands-on course in Internet web site development. Primary emphasis is on each person building a complex web site focused on some area of academic interest and competence using (a) the HTML mark-up language, (b) programs supportive of web site construction (e.g. PhotoShop, Dreamweaver), and (c) the Javascript scripting language, with strong emphasis on the latter. About one-half the course deals with Javascript. Enrollment Limit: 35.
    Instructor: B. Kuperman
  
  •  

    CSCI 140 - Introduction to Computer Programming


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3NS, QP-F

    This is a beginning course in programming using the language Python. The course is aimed at students with little or no prior programming experience who would like to know how software is developed or who would like to be able to write short programs for data manipulation. This course is also useful as preparation for students with no programming experience who want to take the CSCI 150,151 sequence. Enrollment limit: 40.
    Instructor: R. Geitz
  
  •  

    CSCI 142 - Computational and Agent-based Modeling


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3NS, QP-F

    This course is canceled effective 10.29.2008.

    Techniques for creating computer models in the sciences and social sciences. The first half considers mathematical modeling, numerical methods and visualization using MATLAB. The second half considers agent-based modeling in scientific and social systems. Students obtain hands-on experience using NetLogo. Common themes (e.g. diffusion and contagion) are explored across disciplines and modeling paradigms. The course will be enhanced by visitors from the Complex Systems Advanced Academic Workshop of the University of Michigan, who will participate in sessions that develop student model-building skills. Enrollment limit: 35.
    Instructor: R. Salter
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: One of the following: Math 113,114,133 (or higher); CS 150 (or higher); or consent of the instructor.

  
  •  

    CSCI 150 - Principles of Computer Science I


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4NS, QP-F

    Introduction to algorithm design and problem solving in an object- oriented programming language. The course will cover fundamentals of computer programming including data types, variables, expressions, statements, control structures, arrays, and recursion. It will also introduce object- oriented concepts including classes, methods, inheritance, and polymorphism. Enrollment Limit: 48 in the fall and 24 in the spring.
    Instructor: J. Donaldson, R. Geitz, A. Sharp
  
  •  

    CSCI 151 - Principles of Computer Science II


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 4 hours
    Attribute: 4 NS, QP-F

    This course builds upon the principles introduced in CSCI 150 and provides a general background for further study in Computer Science. The course will cover object-oriented programming concepts; the design and implementation of data structures (linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, heaps, and hash tables) and related algorithmic techniques (searching, sorting, recursion); and algorithm analysis. Students will be expected to complete a number of programming projects illustrating the concepts presented. Enrollment Limit: 24.
    Instructor: J. Donaldson, B. Kuperman
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CSCI 150. Notes: Students considering a computer science major are strongly encouraged to take CSCI 150-151 in their first year.
  
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    CSCI 210 - Computer Organization


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3NS, QP-F

    An introduction to computer architecture and assembly language programming. This course describes the organization of computers at the digital logic, register transfer, and instruction set architecture levels. Emphasis is placed on the design of a CPU and on the role of the CPU within a computer system. This course will teach an assembly language using the computer laboratory facilities.
    Instructor: R. Salter
    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSCI 150; CSCI 151 is recommended.
  
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    CSCI 215 - Cryptology


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3NS, QP-F

    A study of secret codes and their relationship to computers. Principally, the mathematics underlying codes and codebreaking (cryptanalysis), and the impact of computers that has resulted in the need for more complex techniques. A historical survey will consider such topics as the deciphering of the Enigma code during World War II. Also considered is the fundamental role of encoding in the principals of computing. Students will write small programs demonstrating deciphering techniques, and use software especially designed for this course.
    Instructor: R. Salter
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: High-school mathematics or consent of the instructor.
  
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    CSCI 241 - Systems Programming


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3NS, QP-F

    This course will consider the C programming language and its relationship to the Unix operating system. It will also introduce the C++ language and focus on differences between the Java and C++. Some Unix system programming issues will also be included. The course will require a significant amount of programming.
    Instructor: B. Kuperman
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CSCI 151.
  
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    CSCI 275 - Programming Abstractions


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits (Range): 0-4 hours
    Attribute: 0-4NS, QP-F

    Programming language fundamentals are studied as abstract concepts using the programming language Scheme. Included are the notions of closures, first-class data structures, procedure and data abstraction, object-oriented programming, continuations, compilation and interpretation, and syntactic extension. Some advanced control structures such as coroutines and asynchronous interrupts may also be included. Enrollment Limit: 48.
    Instructor: R. Geitz, R. Salter
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CSCI 151 or consent of the instructor. Co-requisite: MATH 220.
  
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    CSCI 280 - Introduction to Algorithms


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits (Range): 3 hours
    Attribute: 3NS, QP-F

    Students will be introduced to algorithm design and analysis, with an emphasis on applications to real-life problems arising in computing applications. Students will study the basic design techniques of the field from a theoretical perspective and learn how to apply these techniques to solve problems in simple, efficient ways. Computational complexity focusing on NP-completeness, and algorithmic techniques for intractable problems are also covered. Knowledge of discrete mathematics is necessary.  Enrollment Limit: 48.
    Instructor: A. Sharp
    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note:  Prerequisite: CSCI 275. Co-requisite: MATH 220.
 

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