Sep 25, 2021  
Course Catalog 2018-2019 
    
Course Catalog 2018-2019 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

College and Conservatory Courses (2018-19 and planned future offerings)


 You may wish to consult information about using the Oberlin Catalog located here: Using the Online Catalog to My Advantage  

 
  
  •  

    AAST 060 - Probs: Talking Book Workshop


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Module
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2HU, CD

    This workshop is a hands on exploration of spoken/written narrative within African American visual tradition(s). We will view works by Carrie Mae Weems, Amina Robinson, David Hammons, Whitfield Lovell, and others alongside of texts, listening assignments, and poetry to explore the presence of the spoken word within African American expressivity. Students will be required to write, perform, and compose sonic landscapes that explore their own sense of self and place. Weekly reflections will be assigned in addition to one major project as a culmination of each student’s research.

    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Instructor: J. Coleman

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Cross List Information: Cross listed with ARTS 077
  
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    AAST 072 - Blues Aesthetic: Continuity and Transformation


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    The emphasis of this course is upon the thesis that the Black or `Blues Aesthetic’ is a cultural perspective that emerges from within the experiences of Black people, facing the socio-political and economic conditions of modern and contemporary America. Our focus will be upon the traditions of African American music, literature, theater/film, and specifically the visual arts. Consent of instructor required.

    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Instructor: J. Coleman

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Cross List Information: Cross-Listed with ARTS 071
  
  •  

    AAST 101 - Introduction to Africana Studies


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    An interdisciplinary exploration of key aspects of Black history, culture, and life in Africa and the Americas. The course attempts to provide students with a fundamental intellectual understanding of the universal Black experience as it has been described and interpreted by humanists and social scientists. Included in the course will be such topics as: the Africana Studies movement, the African heritage of Afro-Americans, Pan-African relations, racism and sexism, the family, the role of religion in Black life, class structure and class relations, the political economy of African American life, and Black political power.

    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Instructor: C. Jackson-Smith, C. Peterson

    Prerequisites & Notes: Declared majors are given priority for this course
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies
  
  •  

    AAST 122 - Caribbean Survey: Cuba, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic Part I: Introductory


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    The course provides an introduction to the history of Caribbean nations beginning in Africa to the mid-20th century. The class explores the geography of the Caribbean, the indigenous population, and the role of Africa in providing laborers for the region?s plantation work and its enduring impact on the region’s cultural traditions. Students will examine resistance movements against slavery and imperialism. The class investigates the various methods individuals have used in recording moments of the past.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: Y. Alexis

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    AAST 123 - Caribbean Survey: Cuba, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic Part II: Introductory


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course continues its examination of these three Caribbean nations from the mid 20th century to the early 21st century. The class reflects on the nations? political, social, and cultural contributions while discussing some of its major contradictions and challenges. The course addresses the nations’ independence struggles, systems of governance, and interactions with the global world. We will investigate the various methods individuals have used in recording moments of the past.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: Y. Alexis

  
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    AAST 132 - Introduction to African Studies: Patterns, Issues and Controversies


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WINT

    This course introduces students to the study of Africa. It examines the often negative media representation of Africa as a continuation of a long pattern established by colonial anthropologists, officials and literary writers. It also examines the destabilizing impact of colonialism on pre-colonial African political institutions, social organizations, patterns of belief, etc. Africa’s current difficulties can more fully be understood within this context, which contemporary media portrayals of Africa often ignore.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: D. Opoku

  
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    AAST 141 - The Heritage of Black American Literature


    Next Offered: Course Offered in a Future Term

    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    A survey of Black American literature from its inception in the 18th century to the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920’s. Phillis Wheatley, Jupiter Hammon, David Walker, Maria Stewart, and others up to DuBois and Anna Julia Cooper, including related slave songs, sermons, spirituals, blues, slave narratives and other folk expressions.

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: M. Gadsby

    Prerequisites & Notes: Note: Preference for declared majors and department credit students.
  
  •  

    AAST 171 - Introduction to African American Music I


    Next Offered: Fall Semester

    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    The first semester of a one-year survey of musical styles and forms cultivated by African Americans. First semester includes West African music and West African continuity in the American, early African American instrumental-vocal forms, and the social implications of African American music. Second semester includes later instrumental and vocal music (jazz, blues, rhythm and blues, gospel, soul, etc.) and important composers and performers of works in extended forms.

    Enrollment Limit: 45
    Instructor: F. Hadley

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Cross List Information: This course is cross-listed with JAZZ 290 and MHST 290.
  
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    AAST 172 - Introduction to African American Music II


    Next Offered: Spring Semester

    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    The second semester of a one-year survey of musical styles and forms cultivated by African Americans. This semester includes later instrumental and vocal music (jazz, blues, rhythm and blues, gospel, soul, etc.) and important composers and performers of works in extended forms.

    Enrollment Limit: 45
    Instructor: F. Hadley

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Cross List Information: This course is cross-listed with JAZZ 291 and MHST 291.
  
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    AAST 190 - West African Dance Forms in the Diaspora I: Survey


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals and basic movements of West African Dance. Traditional dance and rhythmic structures of Senegal, Gambia, Guinea, and Mali will be studied to develop skills in beginning African Dance. Culture, history and philosophy of West African dance will also be explored through song, music, performance and academic discourse. This class will be taught from a traditional West African perspective and Pan-African world view in the context of their social, occupational, and religious functions.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: T. Campbell

    Cross List Information: Cross-listed with DANC 190
  
  •  

    AAST 191 - West African Dance Forms in the Diaspora II: Cuba


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course is an expansion to the fundamentals, basic movements, forms, and techniques explored in African Dance I. Traditional dance and rhythmic structures of Casamance, Cuba, Guinea and Mali will be studied in depth to develop skills in advanced African Dance. This class will be explored in total context with traditional costumes, music, culture and customs. This class will be taught from a traditional West African perspective and African world view. Students will perform in a final culminating studio concert.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: T. Campbell

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: DANC/AAST 190 or previous dance experience.
    Cross List Information: This course is cross-listed with DANC 191.
  
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    AAST 195 - Jazz Improv


    Next Offered: Course Offered in a Future Term

    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: 2HU, CD

    The dynamics of this course will involve movement to jazz music as the physical expression of spirituality and emotions. Basic jazz dance forms combined with historical Black vernacular dance will be the technique through which the improvisational movements will develop.

    Enrollment Limit: 30
    Instructor: M. Sharpley

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite & Notes: AAST 190 or 191.
  
  •  

    AAST 199H - Dance Forms–African Diaspora


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2HU, CD

    This course is designed to promote and develop creativity in dance performance of new works through the African-American experience. This course will explore the history, development, and core elements of dance forms of the African Diaspora: Modern Fusion, Afro-beat, Soukous, and Hip-Hop.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: T. Campbell

  
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    AAST 201 - African American History to 1865


    Next Offered: Course Offered in a Future Term

    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4 SS, CD

    A survey of the cultural, social and political development of African peoples in the United States from their pre-seventeenth century origins to the end of the Civil War. Coverage includes: African culture, the transatlantic slave trade, the slave and free communities, abolitionism and emancipation.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: G. Gill

    Consent of the Instructor Required: No
  
  •  

    AAST 203 - Introduction to the Early History of Africa


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    The course equips students with broad knowledge and appreciation of precolonial Africa.  Students will learn of the long history and diverse peoples, cultures, and landscapes of the African continent.  In addition, students will gain an understanding of African indigenous governance, economic, and social systems prevalent in Africa before the imposition of Western systems.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: E. Dinka

    Cross List Information: This course is cross-listed with HIST 127
  
  •  

    AAST 204 - Modern African History


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Credits: 4 Credits
    Attribute: 4 SS, CD

    This course explores the historical roots of the present situation in the continent of Africa . Case studies include Ghana, Ethiopia and South Africa, countries representing some of varied African experiences with modernity. Themes encompass: Christianity, Islam, trade, empire building, colonialism, neocolonialism, ethnicity and race. The course provides a general understanding of modern African history that can be used as a foundation for further inquiry.

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: B. Yates

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Cross List Information: This course is cross-listed with HIST 141
  
  •  

    AAST 220 - Doin’ Time: A History of Black Incarceration


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course considers how a system of imprisoning Black men and women in the U. S. has been sustained from colonial times to the present. Beginning with Foucault’s Discipline and Punish, and Davis’s Are Prisons Obsolete?, the course establishes a theoretical grounding upon which to understand early systems of surveillance and confinement. The course surveys institutions, justice systems, and incarcerated men’s and women’s crimes, punishments and experiences negotiating what can arguably be termed 21st century re-enslavement.

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: P. Brooks

    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies
  
  •  

    AAST 221 - Historic and Contemporary Debates in African American Education


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS,CD

    Students will learn about the evolution of African American education through the examination of notable debates of the 20th and 21st centuries that have impacted its development. In this discussion based interactive course, students will explore topics such as school integration, bussing, charter schools, the use of African American Vernicular English in academic instruction, and the importance of Africana Studies in higher education.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: C. Raynor

  
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    AAST 224 - Beginning Choreography in Cultural Traditions


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This class focuses on the study of choreography, cultural traditions, performance, and participation in the mounting of traditional dance works from inception through rehearsal to performance. Weekly Readings are assigned, exploring the use of space, ritual, rhythm, shape and culture. Classes will emphasize the creative process and the working, artistic relationship between the choreographer and dancers. Repertory rehearsals are geared to enrich and develop personal expression and performance skills in a class setting in order that the final choreographic work is a dynamic experience for both group and individual performance. Readings, discussions and performances are required.

    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Instructor: T. Campbell

    Prerequisites & Notes: DANC/AAST 190 or 191.
    Cross List Information: DANC 224
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Dance
  
  •  

    AAST 227 - Saint Domingue/Haiti in the Atlantic World


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course introduces students to the history of the Atlantic World through an in-depth examination of one of its richest and violent colonies, Saint-Domingue. The course begins with the disdcussion of the indigenous population, pre-1492 and ends in 1805, with the issuance of Haiti’s first Constitution. Students will explore the diverse population of St. Domingue (indigenous, African and European); the structure of colonial society; and St. Domingue’s participation in the Age of Revolution that produced Haiti.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: Y. Alexis

  
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    AAST 228 - Katrina and Black Freedom Struggle


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course situates August 29, 2005 and the meaning of the Katrina disaster in the history of Black Struggle in Louisiana and the surrounding region. Using texts such as Adam Fairclough’s Race and Democracy, Spike Lee’s When the Levees Broke, and Hartman and Squires’s There Is No Such Thing As A Natural Disaster, students examine the historical interplay of race, gender, poverty, and the politics of resistance in a unique area of the U. S. South.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: P. Brooks

  
  •  

    AAST 229 - Radical Thinkers and Movements in the Caribbean


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WINT

    This course engages the works of Caribbean people to document the history of radical thought and movements from the 18th to the mid 20th century. Students are exposed to different areas of the Caribbean and its Diaspora (Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Cuba, Martinique, and the United States, etc.), and its people (Jean-Jacques Dessalines, Arturo Schomburg, Fernando Ortiz, Amy Jacques Garvey, and Shirley Chisholm, etc.) in an examination of revolutionary and nationalist ideologies

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: Y. Alexis

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    AAST 231 - African American Politics


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    African American Politics is an introductory course that examines the traditions of political engagement by the African American community. The course will discuss the major figures, movements and events of the African American political tradition. Specifically the course interrogates ideological , formal and informal political movements and the historic and contemporary effect of Public Policy on African American life.

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: C. Peterson

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    AAST 232 - Africana Philosophy


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    ‘Africana Philosophy’ is a survey course that explores the tradition of philosophical speculation among the communities of the Africana world. Important to the course is the question of ‘what is philosophy’ and ‘what is a philsopher’ in the context of Africana life. The course will examine major texts, writers and diverse schools of thought that explore race, politics, identity, sexuality, and other areas of speculation.

    Enrollment Limit: 30
    Instructor: C. Peterson

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    AAST 235 - Government and Politics of Africa


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WINT

    This course examines pre-colonial African political and social systems and how these were weakened by the imposition of colonialism. It also considers the rise of leaders such as Nkrumah, Kenyatta and Nyerere, the liberation struggles and the wave of independence that swept through Africa in the 1960s. While acknowledging Africa’s development challenges, this course also highlights recent developments such as relative political stability, democratic deepening and the emergence of the African Union as constituting grounds for hope.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: D. Opoku

    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Politics
  
  •  

    AAST 236 - Politics and Society in Africa since the 1980s


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    Two momentous changes have occurred in Africa since the 1980s. The first was the shift to liberal economic reforms commonly called structural adjustment. The second was democratization. These changes, many argue, have vastly diminished the autonomy of the African state, and enabled external hegemonic powers to gain unprecedented influence in Africa since independence. This course examines the political, social and economic implications of these changes at both local and international levels.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: D. Opoku

  
  •  

    AAST 237 - Colonial America, 1880’s-1960


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course examines the history of colonial Africa between the 1880s and the 1960s. It explores the processes of colonial conquest, African responses and the consequences, as well as features of the colonial states. More particularly, the course explores the European ‘scramble’ for Africa and African resistance in various parts of the continent, colonial economies, industrialization and colonialism in South Africa, impacts of colonial rule, the First and the Second Wars and Africa, decolonization and the commencement of the winning of independence. The class will provide students with a broad knowledge of colonial Africa that will prepare them for further in-depth learning of contemporary history of Africa.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: E. Dinka

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Cross List Information: HIST 241
  
  •  

    AAST 244 - Modern African Literature


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    An examination of 20th and 21st century African literature in English with a focus on the political and economic realities of modern day Africa. Keeping in mind that being a writer in Africa is a political act, often punishable by imprisonment and even death, we will appreciate African literature as a platform for political and social critique, as well as the multiplicity of African lives and cultures. Some authors discussed: Chinua Achebe, Ama Ata Aidoo and Ben Okri.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: M. Gadsby

    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Comparative Literature
  
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    AAST 247 - Black Popular Literature


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 3HU

    This Course will examine the emergence of African American popular literature, or literature that exists outside of the widely accepeted canon and will examine the methods used by authors such as Zane, J California Cooper, and Omar Tyree to discuss issues such as sexuality, eroticism, incarceration, poverty, and violence. We will also deal with the politics of canonicity.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: M. Gadsby

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: AAST 141 or AAST 101
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Comparative Literature
  
  •  

    AAST 249 - Afruturism and Black Speculative Fiction: Black to the Future


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WINT

    What are Speculative Fiction and Afrofuturism? How have they gained momentum in African Diasporic literature, art, and popular culture? When Octavia Butler and Charles Delaney coined “speculative fiction” as a genre that challenged absence of Black people in conventional science fiction, they presented models for a future where Black people were subjects not excluded from the narrative of American progress. Course examines the emergence Afrofuturism in 1992 and its application to Black Speculative Fiction in the 20th and 21 st centuries in an international dialogue on Black identities. Authors will include works by Butler, Delaney, Gomez, Okri, Hopkinson, and Okarofor. Required Field Trips: Westwood Cemetery, Allen Art Museum, Oberlin Underground Railroad Center, and relevant sites in Cleveland.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: M. Gadsby

  
  •  

    AAST 261 - “Framing Blackness”: African Americans and Film In The United States 1915 to the Present


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 Credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    Through an interrogation of Hollywood?s construction of Black images and the development of African American independent cinema, this class will examine the multifaceted relationship of African American people to the powerful medium of film. Drawing its title from Ed Guerrero’s book of the same name, ‘Framing Blackness’ will draw on historical and critical readings as well as film viewing. The course will also track the rise of independent Black voice in film and the development of a distinctively Afrocentric aesthetic. Discussions and paper will be used for evaluation.

    Enrollment Limit: 18
    Instructor: C. Jackson Smith

    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Cinema Studies
  
  •  

    AAST 263 - Black English and Voice: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics


    Next Offered: 2019-2020

    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WINT

    Sociolinguistics studies the relationship between language and society and/or language variation by group and location. Given that it is a highly developed ‘dialect’ that was central to definition of the field, this course examines regularities of Black English (sometimes called Ebonics, to indicate both speaker and sound). Along the way, students will be introduced to key concepts of sociolinguistics (e.g., speech community and speech act as well as semantics, morphology, and phonetics/phonology). The course also re-visits the 1997 debates involving Oakland’s intention to feature Ebonics in English education and culminates with consideration of differently stylized ?literary? renderings of Black speech. Field trips required. Prerequisite: AAST 101, AAST 202, or equivalent.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: G. Johns

    Cross List Information: Cross-listed with ENGL 263
  
  •  

    AAST 275 - African-American Performance Theater


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits: 4 Credits
    Attribute: 4 HU

    This course is a workshop for creating performance art including drama, spoken word, dance and musical performance that explores the legacy of the African-American Experience in form or content. From Africa through the Middle Passage and into America, students will read essays, stories, poems and plays-while discussing the legacy and aesthetic of the African tradition within the Diaspora. Students will gain academic information as well as develop their own artistic responses to the material. All will read, write and perform. A workshop performance will be presented using the work of the class.

    Instructor: Mr. Emeka

    Cross List Information: This course is cross-listed with THEA 275.
  
  •  

    AAST 282 - Black Nationalism


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course will explore Black Nationalism as foundational world view within the African American Experience. By investigating Black Nationalism’s major theoreticians, texts and movements, the course will examine Black Nationalism as it presents itself as a social, cultural, political and economic force. 

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: C. Peterson

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    AAST 285 - African American Women’s History


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    A general survey of the history of Black women from colonial times to the present. This course will examine the uniqueness of the Black female experience through the lens of the intersection of race, class and sex in American society. This course studies the lives of Black women from slavery through reconstruction, northern migration, the Harlem Renaissance, the civil rights movement, and on to the development of a contemporary Black feminism. The course includes literature and political commentary from Black women writers and activists.

    Enrollment Limit: 18
    Instructor: P. Brooks

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies
  
  •  

    AAST 337 - African Capitalists and African Development: Seminar


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    The World Bank, backed by the West, has been leading efforts to stimulate capitalism and development in Africa. African capitalists have been conceived as the linchpin of this project, but their ability to spearhead economic growth has been disappointing. This course examines why this is the case, highlighting the political and institutional barriers to the rise of African capitalists, and their implications for development.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: D. Opoku

    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Politics
  
  •  

    AAST 347 - Culture, History, and Identity: Caribbean Literature and the Politics of Survival


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WINT

    This course serves as introduction to Caribbean Literature. Students will examine a wide range of texts that exemplify the beginning and evolution of a literary tradition that is located on a continuum of African Diasporic Literatures. Our discussion will engage the historical, political, and cultural contexts out of which Caribbean Literature has emerged, particularly struggles against colonialism, neocolonialism, sexism, and global capitalism. Some authors discussed are Michelle Cliff, Edward Kamau Brathwaite, and Nalo Hopkinson.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: M. Gadsby

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Latin American Studies, Comparative Literature
  
  •  

    AAST 350 - Intermediate Seminar: Research and Practice in Africana Studies


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WINT

    Students enrolled in AAST 350 Africana Studies Methodologies will engage in focused study and analysis of Africana Studies methodologies and interdisciplinary approaches to the field as foundation for the advanced research pursued in the Senior Seminar. Students will explore interdisciplinarity in an Africana Studies context, what disciplines inform African American Studies methodologies, and examine the circumstances that led to the establishment of Black/African American/Africana Studies Departments and Programs in the United States.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: M. Gadsby

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    AAST 357 - Empire and Resistance in the Caribbean (Haiti, Jamaica, Grenada, & Trinidad)


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    The course examines U.S. & European colonialism and imperialism in the Americas.  Students will analyze these occurrences in the Caribbean region specifically (Cuba, Haiti, Trinidad, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico, etc.) Additionally, we investigate how Caribbean citizens at home and in their respective Diasporas, act against and ally with, colonialist projects and Empire. Our analysis will incorporate theories and praxis related to race, gender, class, violence, memory, and power, etc. 

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: Y. Alexis

  
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    AAST 378 - Soc of African-Amer Community


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    This course shifts through many of the perspectives and empirical research relating to the condition of the African-American community. This will be aided by our exploration into various cultural, religious, historical, educational, economic, and political indicators of these conditions. We will also critically examine the nature and applicability of various sociological and ‘alternative’ theoretical paradigms and discuss the implications of our finding for social policy.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: C. White

    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Sociology or African-American Studies or consent of the instructor.
    Cross List Information: This course is cross-listed with SOCI 378.
  
  •  

    AAST 450 - Senior Seminar


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WADV

    This course will cover aspects of philosophy, history, methodology and research methods in the discipline.

    Enrollment Limit: 16
    Instructor: P. Brooks

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: : AAST 350. Note: Juniors who are majors will be accepted only with consent of instructor or department chair. This is a required course for all Africana Studies majors during the senior year.
  
  •  

    AAST 501F - Senior Honors - Full


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, HONR

    Seniors Honors - Full

    Instructor: P. Brooks, J. Coleman, J. Emeka, C. Jackson-Smith, D. Opoku

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    AAST 501H - Senior Honors - Half


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2SS, HONR

    Seniors Honors -Half

    Instructor: P. Brooks, J. Coleman, J. Emeka, C. Jackson-Smith, D. Opoku

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    AAST 502F - Senior Honors - Full


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, HONR

    Senior Honors - Full

    Instructor: P. Brooks, M. Gadsby, C. Jackson-Smith, C. Peterson, J. Coleman, J. Emeka, D. Opoku

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    AAST 502H - Senior Honors - Half


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2SS, HONR

    Senior Honors - Half

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: P. Brooks, M. Gadsby, C. Jackson-Smith, C. Peterson, J. Coleman, J. Emeka, D. Opoku

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    AAST 995F - Private Reading - Full


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via Banner Self Service. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: P. Brooks, J. Coleman, J. Emeka, C. Jackson-Smith, A. Ofori-Mensa, D. Opoku, C. Peterson, C. Raynor, Staff, M. Gadsby

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Submit Private Reading Card to the Registrar’s Office
  
  •  

    AAST 995H - Private Reading - Half


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2SS

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via Banner Self Service. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: P. Brooks, J. Coleman, J. Emeka, M. Gadsby, C. Jackson-Smith, A. Ofori-Mensa, D. Opoku, C. Peterson, C. Raynor, Staff

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Submit Private Reading Card to the Registrar’s Office
  
  •  

    ACHS 300 - Senior Project


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    Consent of instructor required.

    Instructor: K. Hubbard, A. Margaris, A. Schmidt, A. Wilburn, M. Moore

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ACHS 400 - Honors


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4EX, HONR

    Honors. Archeological Studies majors may undertake Honors research during their senior year under the supervision of a faculty advisor who is normally a member of the Curricular Committee on Archeology. An Honors Project normally consists of a written thesis or other creative project based on original library, laboratory, or field research, or some combination thereof. The final project is submitted in the spring semester of the senior year and followed by a public presentation. Consent of instructor required.

    Instructor: K. Hubbard, A. Margaris, A. Wilburn

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Students who qualify for Honors and are interested in the program should consult with the program director by the beginning of the second semester in their junior year. Honors proposals are due on or about April 15.
  
  •  

    ANTH 101 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    An introduction to cultural anthropology through an examination of basic concepts, methods, and theories that anthropologists employ in order to understand the unity and diversity of human thought and action cross-culturally. Language and culture, kinship and the family, politics and conflict, religion and belief, and the impact of social change and globalization on traditional institutions are some of the topics to be considered in a range of ethnographic contexts.

    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Instructor: B. Pineda, Staff

  
  •  

    ANTH 102 - Human Origins


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course focuses on paleoanthropology and is an introduction to the evolutionary development of humans. We will examine biological relationships between humans and other primates, primate behavior and classification, and the fossil evidence for human evolution. Emphasis will be placed on the methods used in the study of prehistoric human biological and cultural development.

    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Instructor: A. Margaris

  
  •  

    ANTH 130 - “Natural” Disasters, Culture, and Sustainability in Indonesia WT18


    Next Offered: Offered in a Future Term

    Semester Offered: First Semester Second Module
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2 SS

    Situated on the Pacific Ring of Fire, Indonesia is host to frequent seismic and volcanic activities. In recent years, Indonesia has also experienced events such as volcanoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, floods. Drawing on multiple disciplinary perspectives, this class explores the cultural engagements with and responses to hazards in the environment that turn into so-called “natural” disasters. Course materials & discussions focus on the interactions of communities and artists with natural hazards; the framing and interpretation of disasters in museums; social dimensions of disaster preparedness and management; and sustainability issues. Required for participants in WT2018 LIASE Study Trip to Indonesia.
    Field trips required.

    Enrollment Limit: 8
    Instructor: J. Fraser

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Participants in WT2018 LIASE Study Trip to Indonesia
  
  •  

    ANTH 202 - Fundamentals of Linguistics


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, QFR

    This course introduces the scientific study of language by systematically exploring similarities and differences across human languages. Using actual data from real languages, students will learn basic methodologies of analysis and important results from subfields of linguistics including phonetics (possible human speech sounds), phonology (language-specific systemic organization of speech sounds), morphology (word-formation processes), syntax (sentence structures), semantics (meaning), language change, and sociolinguistics. Additional topics may include sign languages, language acquisition, and/or animal communication.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: J. Haugen

  
  •  

    ANTH 203 - Introduction to Archaeology


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, QFR

    An introduction to the subfield of anthropology concerned with past human cultures. A basic objective is to acquaint students with both the methods and techniques that archeologists employ in the study and reconstruction of prehistoric societies. Examples will be drawn from a variety of archeological situations ranging from simple hunting and gathering societies to complex chiefdoms and states. Matters of contemporary debate in the area of archeology and the public will also be considered.

    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Instructor: A. Margaris

  
  •  

    ANTH 204 - Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course is an introduction to the subfield of linguistic anthropology. Topics include surveys of theories of language and culture and theories of linguistic diversity (including contributions of such seminal figures as Boas, Sapir, and Whorf), ethnographic methods (including conceptions of speech communities, practices of observing, interviewing, and recording, and discussion of ethics), methods of transcription, and contemporary approaches to understanding language and meaning and language as social action.

    Enrollment Limit: 26
    Instructor: E. Hoffmann-Dilloway

    Prerequisites & Notes: The course is intended as a prerequisite for more advanced courses in Linguistic Anthropology and in related areas. No prior coursework in language and culture is required.
  
  •  

    ANTH 210 - Indigenous Peoples of Latin America


    Next Offered: Offered in a Future Term

    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to modern historical, ethnohistorical and anthropological approaches to the indigenous populations of Latin America. The course will focus on the ongoing process of conflict and accommodation that has characterized the relationship between the native peoples of the New World and those of the Old World. We will study indigenous social movements dealing with issues such as land claims, natural resources, economic development, cultural recognition and human rights

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: B. Pineda

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: ANTH 101 , This course may also count for the major in HISP and LATS.
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Hispanic Studies, Latin American Studies
  
  •  

    ANTH 212 - Ecological Perspectives on Small-Scale Societies


    Next Offered: Offered in a Future Term

    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    Popular conceptions regard forager societies as primitive and naive or as prescient conservationists. In this course we will use an ecological framework to explore diversity in forager cultures, and the complex relationships that exist between small-scale societies and their environments. We will also consider the relevance of contemporary foragers to the study of the prehistoric past, and the futures of these groups as they are increasingly drawn into the global economic market.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: A. Margaris

  
  •  

    ANTH 227 - Medical Anthropology


    Next Offered: Offered in a Future Term

    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WINT

    This course will cultivate an anthropological understanding of the intersections between disease, health, society, the body, culture, and global political economy. Drawing on accounts from across the globe, our topics will include: comparative study of health systems; cross-cultural definitions and understandings of disease, illness, and health; bodies, medicine, and the media; maladies from chronic pain to AIDS to cholera; health, ethics, and morality; health inequalities; and global health.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: C. Biruk

    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies
  
  •  

    ANTH 254 - Animal Biocapital


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    The legal and ethical status of farmed and laboratory animals pose complex questions.  This course examines the culture and polotics of industrial animal husbandry and the prduction of animal biocapital.  What does it mean to “produce” animal flesh?  To “invent” and organism?  To patent life?  it has been fourty years since a contributor to the journal Hog Farm Management infamously declared the the farmers should “forget the pig is an animal,” and “treat him just like a machine in a factory.”  In that time, challenging questions over the legal and ethical status of farmed and laboratory animals have only grown more urgent and complex.   This course examines the culture and politics of industrial animal husbandry and the production of animal biocapital.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: L. Beldo

  
  •  

    ANTH 257 - Graphic Anthropology


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD

    This course explores past contributions of and future possibilities for sketching and drawing as anthropological methods. How can sketches complement field notes? How might graphic ethnographies complement scholarly books and articles? How do anthropologists across the ‘four-fields’ engage graphic methods in different ways? What ethical issues might accompany the increasing use of graphic methods? While students do not need any special background in or skill with drawing, participation in this course will involve active experimentation with graphic means of observing, participating in, and analyzing interactions, and of circulating anthropological insights. Either this course or CRWR 255: Graphic Narrative required for the ‘Graphic Accounts: Telling Through Pictures’ learning community.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: E. Hoffmann-Dilloway

  
  •  

    ANTH 278 - Human Rights, Universalism and Cultural Relativism


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WINT

    Through an examination of the ways in which people in different societies identify and define ethical and social standards, this course will examine the concept of universal human rights. This course will consider the tension between universal claims and cultural relativism. We will also document and analyze the development of international efforts to apply universal rights.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: B. Pineda

    Prerequisites & Notes: : This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements): LATS.
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    Latin American Studies
  
  •  

    ANTH 319 - Media Ethnography


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4HU, CD, WINT

    As social, political, and cultural worlds are constituted with and through media, this course asks: how can we use media and ethnography to better understand and interpret our social lives? Grounding in the history, practices, tenets, and sensibilities of ethnography, we will focus on how to use ethnography to study media representations, production, and consumption, as well as how to use scholarly media production to interpret social worlds. We will explore different types of media ethnography including performance ethnography, ethnographic discourse analysis, and hashtag ethnography. Students will have the opportunity to produce media projects, such as short films and podcasts.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: L.Beutin

    Cross List Information: Cross Listed with RHET 319
  
  •  

    ANTH 353 - Culture Theory


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WADV

    A critical examination of theories and debates in the study of culture since the nineteenth century. Topics include: evolutionism, functionalism, symbolic anthropology, structuralism, political economy, feminist and postcolonial critique, and postmodernism. We explore the historical context, legacies, and utility of each approach for theorizing: agency, structure, power, knowledge, culture, subjectivity, and the politics of representation. We consider the consequences of theoretical assumptions for the collection, interpretation, and presentation of ethnographic data.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: Staff

  
  •  

    ANTH 376 - Language and Prehistory


    Next Offered: In a Future Term

    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course examines what anthropologists can glean from the prehistoric human past through the study of language relatedness, linguistic reconstruction, and language change. The major theoretical approaches to and methodologies of historical linguistics will be introduced and then applied to specific case studies from around the world. Major issues to be addressed will include prehistoric population contacts and movements, as well as the reconstruction of protolanguages and protocultures.

    Enrollment Limit: 20
    Instructor: J. Haugen

  
  •  

    ANTH 382 - Archeological Lab Methods


    Next Offered: In a Future Term

    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    A hands-on course aimed at deepening students? understanding of how archaeologists make meaning from the material record. Readings in practical and theoretical problems in the discipline will help guide our survey of basic methods used for artifact and faunal analyses, and for recording, managing, and analyzing archaeological data. We will also consider emerging trends in data sharing and collections building through the use of digital media. Prerequisite & Notes: ANTH 103 required. STAT 113 or STAT 114 recommended.

    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Instructor: A. Margaris

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 391F - Practicum in Anthropology


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    Junior or senior majors in the department may receive up to three hours of credit for applied fieldwork in anthropology. The work should be carried out in connection with a systematic course of reading and the writing of a paper on the topic of the project. The purpose of the paper is to tie the field experience to relevant anthropological principles. The program should be worked out in advance with a department faculty sponsor. Consent of instructor required.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: C. Biruk, J. Haugen, E. Hoffmann-Dilloway, A. Margaris, B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 391H - Practicum in Anthropology


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2SS

    Junior or senior majors in the department may receive up to three hours of credit for applied fieldwork in anthropology. The work should be carried out in connection with a systematic course of reading and the writing of a paper on the topic of the project. The purpose of the paper is to tie the field experience to relevant anthropological principles. The program should be worked out in advance with a department faculty sponsor. Consent of instructor required.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: C. Biruk, J. Haugen, E. Hoffmann-Dilloway, A. Margaris, B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 402 - The Native Languages of the Americas


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    This course surveys the languages indigenous to North and South America, and addresses such topics as grammatical (phonetic, phonological, morphological, and syntactic) diversity among these languages; language families and other historical relationships in the Americas; the use of linguistic evidence to investigate the first peopling of the Americas; and historical and contemporary cultural contexts of language use in the Americas, including issues surrounding language maintenance and revitalization, and colonial contact and language death. Prerequisite & Notes: ANTH 202 or another course in introductory linguistics, or consent of instructor.

    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Instructor: J. Haugen

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 415F - Internships in Teaching


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    Qualified seniors who wish to assist in the teaching of specific courses may, upon consent of the instructor, achieve one or two hours for their work in such courses. Assistance with laboratory sessions, data analysis, and the research concerns of students in the class compose the major activities of the teaching internships.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: C. Biruk, J. Haugen, E. Hoffmann-Dilloway, A. Margaris, B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 415H - Internships in Teaching


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2SS

    Qualified seniors who wish to assist in the teaching of specific courses may, upon consent of the instructor, achieve one or two hours for their work in such courses. Assistance with laboratory sessions, data analysis, and the research concerns of students in the class compose the major activities of the teaching internships.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: C. Biruk, J. Haugen, E. Hoffmann-Dilloway, A. Margaris, B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 416 - Race, Racism, and Human Variation in Global Perspective


    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    The belief that the inborn characteristics of groups of people are responsible for differences in achievement, among other things, between them is present in one form or another in every society. In this seminar we will use a four-fields approach (biological and cultural) to examine both the underlying patterns of human biological variation as well as the varied manifestations of race and racism today. Case studies will be drawn from across the globe.

    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Instructor: B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 455 - Culture and Activisim


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    This seminar analyzes the cultural logics and practices of activism, including the emergenc of novel forms of political engagement and the political imaginaries on which they depend. What does it mean to be an activist? How, and in what conditions, are activist communities produced and maintained? How have activists viewed the fole of the “intelligentsia” in social movements? What was the relation between activism and t20th century revolutionary ideologies? We will approach these questions by examining a series of historical and contemporary moments, from May ‘68 and the Velvet Revolution to hactivism and Occupy Wall Street.

    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Instructor: Beldo

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 482 - Anthropology of Good Intentions


    Next Offered: In a Future Term

    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD, WADV

    This seminar critically analyzes the cultural politics of our humanitarian age. We will problematize logics of gifting, sacrifice, and ‘doing good’ as they play out in historical and contemporary projects staged by missionaries, NGOs, states, global aid institutions, development workers, and others. Reading ethnographic, filmic, journalistic, and historical sources alongside critical theory, we will consider the consequences, contingencies, and ethics of good intentions in a global world.

    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Instructor: C. Biruk

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 490F - Junior Year Honors


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, HONR

    Junior honors. Requires consent of the instructor.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: C. Biruk, J. Haugen, E. Hoffmann-Dilloway, A. Margaris, B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 490H - Junior Year Honors


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2SS, HONR

    Junior honors. Requires consent of the instructor.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: C. Biruk, J. Haugen, E. Hoffmann-Dilloway, A. Margaris, B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 491F - Senior Year Honors


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, HONR

    Senior honors. Requires the consent of the instructor.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: C. Biruk, J. Haugen, E. Hoffmann-Dilloway, A. Margaris, B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 491H - Senior Year Honors


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2SS, HONR

    Senior honors. Consent of the instructor required.

    Enrollment Limit: 999
    Instructor: C. Biruk, J. Haugen, E. Hoffmann-Dilloway, A. Margaris, B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    ANTH 974 - Collecting Colonialism


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    This class will explore the history and ongoing legacies of European colonialism by framing material culture as the embodiment of social relationships. Using London?s museum collections, we will explore both the history of colonial-era collecting of ethnographic materials and the ways in which these materials are stored, curated, and displayed today. Through readings in museum anthropology, material culture studies, and art history; site visits to London-area museums; and group discussions and written reflection, we will attempt to understand the shifting relationships between source communities, the politics of display, and the museum-going public. Taught in London.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: A. Margaris

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prior application and acceptance to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.
    This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) :
    As an elective requirement in Archaeological Studies (ACHS)
  
  •  

    ANTH 984A - Geoarchaeology: Sourcing the Past


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS, CD

    Geoarcheology is the application of earth-science techniques to archaeological interpretation. Geologists and archaeologists often work hand-in-hand to better understand a region?s geological and climatic histories, and their relationships to past human activities. This interdisciplinary course, based on case studies of artifacts housed in London museums, along with site visits, will provide fodder for both archaeological and geological analysis. Topics will include stratigraphy, coastal processes, and Stone Age technologies; geochemical provenancing and geospatial studies; and the geological environments that influence the preservation of archaeological sites. Prerequisite: Taught in London.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: A. Margaris, F. Page

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prior application and acceptance to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.
    Cross List Information: GEOL 984A
  
  •  

    ANTH 984B - Geoarchaeology: Sourcing the Past


    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4NS, QFR

    Geoarcheology is the application of earth-science techniques to archaeological interpretation. Geologists and archaeologists often work hand-in-hand to better understand a region?s geological and climatic histories, and their relationships to past human activities. This interdisciplinary course, based on case studies of artifacts housed in London museums, along with site visits, will provide fodder for both archaeological and geological analysis. Topics will include stratigraphy, coastal processes, and Stone Age technologies; geochemical provenancing and geospatial studies; and the geological environments that influence the preservation of archaeological sites. Prerequisite: Taught in London.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: A. Margaris, F. Page

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prior application and acceptance to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.
    Cross List Information: GEOL 984B
  
  •  

    ANTH 995F - Private Reading - Full


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Full Course
    Credits: 4 credits
    Attribute: 4SS

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: C. Biruk, J. Haugen, E. Hoffmann-Dilloway, A. Margaris, B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Submit Private Reading Card to the Registrar’s Office
  
  •  

    ANTH 995H - Private Reading - Half


    Semester Offered: First Semester, Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 credits
    Attribute: 2SS

    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via Banner Self Service. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

    Enrollment Limit: 5
    Instructor: C. Biruk, J. Haugen, E. Hoffmann-Dilloway, A. Margaris, B. Pineda

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Submit Private Reading Card to the Registrar’s Office
  
  •  

    APST 101 - Beginning Piano


    Next Offered: Fall 2015

    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: CNDP

    A one-semester course for Arts and Science students with no previous piano experience. 

    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Instructor: A. McAlister

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
  •  

    APST 110 - Piano Class


    Next Offered: Fall 2013

    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: CNDP

    A basic one-year course (should be taken in the freshman year) including technique, sight reading, harmonization, improvisation, accompaniment, and piano repertoire. Section numbers  (last two digits) relate to placement levels.

    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Instructor: A. McAlister, L. Archibald

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Admission by placement/audition. Open only to Conservatory students who must complete a piano requirement.

     

  
  •  

    APST 111 - Piano Class


    Next Offered: Spring 2014

    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: CNDP

    A basic one-year course (should be taken in the freshman year) including technique, sight reading, harmonization, improvisation, accompaniment and piano repertoire. Section numbers (last two digits) relate to placement levels.

    Enrollment Limit: 12
    Instructor: A. McAlister, L. Archibald

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Admission by placement/audition.
    Open only to Conservatory students who must complete a piano requirement.

     

  
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    APST 112 - Keyboard Accompanying (Vocal)


    Next Offered: Fall & Spring Semesters

    Semester Offered: First & Second Semester
    HC
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: CNDP

    Following a brief placement audition, pianists are paired with singers according to the needs of the voice department. Students may also make arrangements to accompany specific singers, subject to accompanying faculty’s approval. Accompanying projects are supervised by the voice teacher and accompanying faculty. Five hours of weekly contact time are expected, including rehearsals, voice lessons, coachings with accompanying faculty, but not practice time.

    Enrollment Limit: 25
    Instructor: T. Bandy

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: May be repeated for credit. Open to all keyboard players.

     

  
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    APST 113 - Keyboard Accomp (Instrumental)


    Next Offered: Fall 2013 & Spring 2014

    Semester Offered: First and Second Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: CNDP

    Assignments will be made from repertoire requests submitted by the applied faculty. Students are encouraged to make arrangements to accompany specific instrumentalists, subject to accompanying faculty?s approval. Accompanying projects will be supervised by the instrumental teacher and accompanying faculty. Five hours of weekly contact time are expected, including weekly master classes with accompanying faculty, rehearsals, lessons, coachings, but not individual practice time.

    Enrollment Limit: 40
    Instructor: J. Howsmon

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: May be repeated for credit.  Open to all keyboard players.

     

  
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    APST 118 - Vocal Studies Seminar


    Next Offered: Spring 2014

    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    Credits: 1 Credit
    Attribute: CNDP

    Team-taught by members of the Vocal Studies Division and invited guests, this seminar provides voice majors information that will help them succeed at Oberlin and in their future performing careers.  Among the topics covered are Learning and Practice Strategies, Vocal Health and Nutrition, Recital Planning, Vocal Coaching, and Resumes/Bios/CVs.  

    Enrollment Limit: 35
    Instructor: T. LeFebvre

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course is limited to and required of first-year and Conservatory voice majors.
  
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    APST 120 - Beginning Voice Class


    Next Offered: Fall & Spring Semesters
    (Previous Title: Voice Class)


    Semester Offered: First & Second Semester
    HC
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: CNDP

    A course in the basics of vocal technique and performance. Exploration of good alignment, breathing, tone production, resonance and communication, developed through group warm-ups and individual song performances.

    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Instructor: L. Stidham

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Audition and/or conset or instructor. (For non-majors & college students.)
  
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    APST 120A - Time Travel for Pianists


    Next Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

    Semester Offered: First and Second Semester (First Module)
    Credits: 1 Credit
    Attribute: CNDP

    A one-module course. Historical keyboard instruments (various fortepianos and clavichords) are used as experimental tools for learning about style. Students will be expected to bring pieces they are studying or have studied (Bach through Liszt) to a weekly meeting with the instructor, and will be expected to make a presentation in class, at the end of the module. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.

     

    Enrollment Limit: 4
    Instructor: D. Breitman

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Instructor’s consent with the permission of the principal teacher.  Pass/No Pass Grading only. 

  
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    APST 120B - Time Travel for Pianists


    Next Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters

    Semester Offered: First and Second Semester (Second Module)
    Credits: 1 Credit
    Attribute: CNDP

    A one-module course. Historical keyboard instruments (various fortepianos and clavichords) are used as experimental tools for learning about style. Students will be expected to bring pieces they are studying or have studied (Bach through Liszt) to a weekly meeting with the instructor, and will be expected to make a presentation in class at the end of the module. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.

    Enrollment Limit: 4
    Instructor: D. Breitman

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Instructor’s consent with the permission of the principal teacher. Pass/No Pass Grading only.
  
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    APST 121 - Performing Beethoven’s Violin Sonatas


    Next Offered: Next Offered Spring 2019, 2021….

    Semester Offered: Second Semester, First Module
    Credits: 1 Credit
    Attribute: CNDP

    This course gives students the opportunity to play in a workshop setting with David Breitman at the fortepiano (pitch=A440). Each student will prepare a different movement each week (6 movements over the module). Prior experience with a period violin/bow is neither required nor expected; students may use their modern violin in this course. Differences between the modern and earlier violin will be touched on, however, and interested students may be able to borrow equipment,depending on availability.

    Enrollment Limit: 4
    Instructor: D. Breitman

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Violin majors only (permission of the principal teacher required).
  
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    APST 121A - Bach at the Clavier


    Next Offered: Fall & Spring Semesters

    Semester Offered: First & Second Semester, First Module
    Credits: 1 Credit
    Attribute: CNDP

    An introduction to the harpsichord for pianists, focusing on the music of J.S. Bach. This course allows students to experiement with historical styles, techniques, and instruments, applying what they’ve learned to their interpretation of Bach at the piano. Topics include articulation, fingering, meter, arpeggiation, and ornamentation. Students are expected to bring to class pieces by Bach they are studying or have studied in the past.

    Enrollment Limit: 4
    Instructor: M. Edwards

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: This is a one-module course, and may be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. Students may also consider enrolling in APST 120A and/or APST 120B (Time Travel for Pianists) as a modular complement to this course. Enrollment is by instructor’s consent.
  
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    APST 121B - Bach at the Clavier


    Next Offered: Fall & Spring Semesters

    Semester Offered: First & Second Semester, Second Module
    Credits: 1 Credits
    Attribute: CNDP

    An introduction to the harpsichord for pianists, focusing on the music of J.S. Bach. This course allows students to experiement with historical styles, techniques, and instruments, applying what they’ve learned to their interpretation of Bach at the piano. Topics include articulation, fingering, meter, arpeggiation, and ornamentation. Students are expected to bring to class pieces by Bach they are studying or have studied in the past.

    Enrollment Limit: 4
    Instructor: M. Edwards

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: This is a one-module course, and may be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. Students may also consider enrolling in APST 120A and/or APST 120B (Time Travel for Pianists) as a modular complement to this course. Enrollment is by instructor’s consent.
  
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    APST 122 - Performing Beethoven’s Cello Sonatas


    Next Offered: Next Offered Spring 2019, 2021…

    Semester Offered: Second Semester, Second Module (Alternate Years)
    Credits: 1 Credit
    Attribute: CNDP

    This course gives students the opportunity to play in a workshop setting with David Breitman at the fortepiano (pitch=A440). Each student will prepare a different movement each week (6 movements over the module). Prior experience with a period cello/bow is neither required nor expected; students may use their modern cello in this course. Differences between the modern and earlier cello will be touched on, however, and interested students may be able to borrow equipment,depending on availability.

    Enrollment Limit: 4
    Instructor: D. Breitman

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Cello majors only (permission of the prinicpal teacher required).
  
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    APST 130 - Viola Class


    Next Offered: Fall 2016

    Semester Offered: First Semester
    Half Course
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: CNDP

    A one-semester course required of all students whose principal applied study is violin. The course is designed to familiarize the student with viola technique and clef reading.

    Enrollment Limit: 10
    Instructor: K. Docter

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course may be waived by examination.

     

  
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    APST 140 - Internalizing Rhythms


    Next Offered: Fall 2013 & Spring 2014

    Semester Offered: First and Second Semester
    Credits: 1 Credit
    Attribute: CNDP

    A workshop for instrumentalists and vocalists that focuses on the student’s ability to internalize and comprehend a range of rhythms that originate in multiple cultures. The teaching emphasizes speaking rhythm and then performing the lessons on the frame drum. The course materials are based upon a contemporary application of old-world teaching methods from North Africa, the Mid-east, and South India. The rhythms are poly-rhythmical an cyclical in nature. The playing techniques implemented are basic hand and finger techniques adapted from South Indian drumming and can be applied to a variety of percussion instruments.

    Enrollment Limit: 30
    Instructor: J. Haddad, J. Ashby

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
  
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    APST 141 - Internalizing Rhythms II


    Next Offered: Fall 2013 & Spring 2014

    Semester Offered: First and Second Semester
    Credits: 1 Credit
    Attribute: CNDP

    Continues work on the concepts of levels of rhythms and the ways to view them. The effect of these lessons is meant to give the student a greater sense of the mystical power of something simply done in a clear profound fashion. The class will explore how the split finger drum technique can be applied to other drums and percussion instruments, and watch and hear audio examples of a variety of indigenous musicians  from around the world and discuss the aspects that transcend style on a global music basis. Applying the concepts shared in class, students will start to create some pieces using the frame drum and a family of other percussion instruments that the instructor will provide. Class assignments will include original short basic compositions or adaptations of known songs that show a level of mastery of the concepts presented in class.

    Enrollment Limit: 15
    Instructor: J. Haddad, J. Ashby

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Completion of APST 140.
  
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    APST 142 - Beginning Improvisation


    Next Offered: Spring Semester

    Semester Offered: Second Semester
    HC
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: CNDP

    Intended for beginning improvisers or those with only limited experience in improvisation, this class will introduce techniques and concepts that cultivate the development of basic improvisational skills: Melodic embellishment, outlining chords with melody, melodic transformation, developing vocabulary, strategies for ear training and strengthening theoretical knowledge.  This class is not genre specific; examples of common practices in a variety of styles and genres will be studied.

    Enrollment Limit: 18
    Instructor: P. Dominguez, Staff

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Open to all instrumentalists and vocalists in majors other than jazz. 
  
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    APST 204 - Interpretation of Art Song


    Next Offered: Fall & Spring Semester

    Semester Offered: First & Second Semester
    HC
    Credits: 2 Credits
    Attribute: CNDP

    Individual coaching sessions for singer/accompanist duos on musical style, interpretation, ensemble, languages, and presentation. Students who begin coaching first semester for a second semester recital will receive a deferred grade pending completion of the recital. Piano majors may substitute this course for one of the required keyboard accompanying credits.

    Enrollment Limit: 8
    Instructor: T. Bandy

    Consent of the Instructor Required: Yes
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites and Notes Note: Accompanists may repeat the course for credit once. Open to seniors and artist diploma candidates preparing degree recitals, and to their accompanists.
 

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