Jul 22, 2024  
Course Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Course Catalog 2022-2023 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Search


This is a comprehensive listing of all active, credit-bearing courses offered by Oberlin College and Conservatory since Fall 2016. Courses listed this online catalog may not be offered every semester; for up to date information on which courses are offered in a given semester, please see PRESTO. 

For the most part, courses offered by departments are offered within the principal division of the department. Many interdisciplinary departments and programs also offer courses within more than one division.

Individual courses may be counted simultaneously toward more than one General Course Requirement providing they carry the appropriate divisional attributes and/or designations.

 

English

  
  • ENGL 328 - Modern Drama II: Brecht to Pinter

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course will study the development of drama from World War II to 1975 from both a literary and a theatrical point of view. Playwrights will include Brecht, Beckett, Ionesco, Genet, Churchill, Pinter, Fornes, and Adrienne Kennedy. Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled “Advanced Courses.”
    This course is cross-listed with THEA 316


  
  • ENGL 330 - Modernist Chicago: Urban Literature and Sociology

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course focuses on literature associated with the social, literary, and academic scene of Chicago from 1900 to 1959. Reading multi-ethnic articulations of patterns of identity and lifestyle emerging due to rapid industrialization, migration, and class differentiation, we will consider both social and formal features of this strain of modernism (in works by Dreiser, Anderson, Farrell, Wright, Himes, and Hansberry, among others); we will also examine select sociological studies and reflections on Chicago’s intellectual culture. American, Diversity, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled “Advanced Courses.”
  
  • ENGL 332 - Song and Book

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    The lyric poem has always had a close but mysterious relationship to music and song. This course will investigate these relationships by reading and writing lyrics, both in the poetic and musical sense of the word. Writing will include interpretive analysis and poetic exercises.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two 200-level English courses or consent of the professor.
  
  • ENGL 333 - Just Sayin’: African American Essay

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    The essay, initiated in the 16th century by Montaigne, has been a fluid (formless?) and expressive genre. In contrast to the academic article, the essay invites provisional, inductive, and sometimes unruly thinking in both writer and reader, with the rules of evidence often suspended. The genre has been central to the African American intellectual tradition, and this course examines major moments in the history and art of such turns to the essay as well as related critical theory and will encourage students to try their own rigorous experimental writing.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two 200-level courses. Requirements can be waived with instructor consent.
  
  • ENGL 338 - Modern Fiction and Sexual Difference

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course will study the representation of gay and lesbian experience in selected British and American fiction, both modern and contemporary. We will begin with early 20th-century figures (Cather, Wilde, Mann, Forster, Larsen), and proceed to short fiction and novels written after 1960 by such writers as James Baldwin, Michael Chabon, Alan Hollinghurst, Jeanette Winterson, and Michael Cunningham. British OR American (not both), Diversity, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled “Advanced Courses.”
  
  • ENGL 343 - American Gothic

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    What was haunting early America? This course will examine the forms, preoccupations, and uses of the gothic in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American literature. Gothic literature stages the deepest anxieties in a culture and exposes our fears of dissolving or transgressed boundaries between the known and the unknown, self and other, sanity and madness, civilization and savagery, and good and evil. This may also count towards the major in CAST. Pre-1800.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENGL 299 or two 200-Level courses. Requirements can be waived with instructor consent.
  
  • ENGL 348 - Modern Drama: Ibsen to Pirandello

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course explores the different ways in which “reality” was staged by playwrights including Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Shaw, and Pirandello. We will consider how modern theatrical movements such as realism, naturalism, expressionism, and metadrama sought to represent “reality,” focusing on evolving stagecraft. Emphasis will also be placed on the historical and cultural contexts surrounding the early stages of modern drama. Diversity, 1700-1900 OR Post-1900 (not both).
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled “Advanced Courses.”
    This course is cross-listed with THEA 348


  
  • ENGL 349 - Contemporary Drama, 1980 to the Present

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course will study the developments mainly in British and American drama during the last ten to fifteen years. Plays will be discussed from both a literary and theatrical point of view, with attention to their historical, cultural, and political context. Among the playwrights we will be reading, a tentative list might include Tony Kushner, David Henry Huang, Maria Irene Fornes, Caryl Churchill, Edward Albee, Suzan-Lori Parks, Sarah Ruhl, and Yasmina Reza. Diversity, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program scetion titled “Advanced Courses.”
    This course is cross-listed with THEA 349


  
  • ENGL 356 - New Orleans, New England: The Regional and the National

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    During regionalism’s heyday at the turn into the twentieth century, the cultures of New Orleans and New England – literary, linguistic, musical, visual, culinary – were cast as “regional.” What did regionalization entail as the post-Reconstruction nation consolidated? What constituted a “region”? We’ll study literature by Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Kate Chopin, George Washington Cable, Charles W. Chesnutt, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Sarah Orne Jewett, Henry James, Pauline Hopkins and others as well as cultural phenomena like New Orleans’ French Opera, the emergence of jazz, and Colonial Revival within local and national historical and political contexts. American, Diversity, 1700-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled “Advanced Courses.”
  
  • ENGL 357 - Inventing America: Histories of the Book, Archive, and Empire

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    What is America? Where is it? And how did it come into being? This class examines the literary and discursive ‘invention’ of America - as a place, a discourse, and an episteme - from roughly the seventeenth-century through the present. We will explore the relationships among print cultures, archives, and power in the making of American empire. Readings will focus on both historical and contemporary novellas, poems, plays, short stories, and graphic novels that ‘rewrite,’ ‘decolonize,’ and ‘reimagine’ American spaces, histories, and literatures. Authors may include Catalina de Erauso, Kyle Baker, Leslie Marmon Silko, Michelle Cliff, Toni Morrison, and M. NourbeSe Philip.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENGL 299 or two 200-Level courses or consent of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 360 - The End: Globalization and Literature

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Have we reached the end of the world-end as goal, destination, and death? In what ways does globalization chart the narratives of empire and capitalism that have structured recent world history? This course will develop critical frameworks for reading and writing about globalization in literature. This course demands a sustained inquiry into the cultural and political projects that emerge from, participate in, and critique the effects of transnational capital.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENGL 299 or two 200-Level courses or consent of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 361 - Strange Cinema

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course will explore the effect of strangeness in movies. What are the ways in which this effect is created? To what uses do filmmakers put the experience of strangeness? What baseline of familiar do we use to judge strange movies? We will explore strangeness as both a poetics and an aesthetic, and its relation to effects such as the uncanny, the fantastic, the marvelous, and the wonderful.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 110, 290, 298, or 299 or consent of the instructor.
    This course is cross-listed with CINE 360


  
  • ENGL 363 - Gaines, Morrison, Wideman: Textualizing Orality and Literacy

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    In Orality and Literacy, Walter Ong outlined a theory about changes in human thought processes that result from developments in speech, writing, and print. Beginning with this classic study, this course will focus closely on three contemporary novelists who continue the African American tradition’s own “play” between writing and orality. Examining Ernest Gaines, Toni Morrison, and John Edgar Wideman, we will study their post-Civil Rights (paradoxically) textual experiments in re-configuring and re-presenting “the black interior.” This course may count towards the major in CAST. American, Diversity, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled ‘Advanced Courses.’
  
  • ENGL 366 - Nature and Transcendentalism

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    An examination of the writings of the American Transcendentalists of the 19th century with special attention to Emerson, Thoreau, and the concept of nature. We will study some of the early contributors to this school of thought, as well as more recent expositors. Students should be prepared to tackle difficult texts that pose challenging philosophical, political, and interpretive questions.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENGL 299 or two 200-Level courses or consent of instructor. This course may count towards the major in ENVS.
  
  • ENGL 367 - The French Joyce

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    James Joyce wrote mainly in English but drew great inspiration from French writers: Dujardin, Laforgue, Balzac, Flaubert, Verlaine, and many more. This course examines both the influence of French authors on Joyce, especially his major works, and of Joyce on subsequent French literary culture. Taught in English. Diversity, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: A literature course in any language.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 367


  
  • ENGL 368 - Cultures of Basketball

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course examines the history of basketball play and its attendant culture. We will approach the game as a generator of cultural myths, a socio-historical practice, and as embodied aesthetic performance. To do so, we will use methods of literary studies together with other disciplines to examine texts, players, teams, moments, techniques, strategies and styles of play - particularly in professional basketball - from the time of the game’s invention in 1891 to the present. We will pay special attention to the complex relationship between athletic ideals like sportsmanship, moral notions like unselfishness, and social categories such as race and gender.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENGL 299 or two 200-Level courses or consent of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 371 - Politics and Pleasure

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Is pleasure political? Can politics be pleasurable? This course will explore theoretical and creative approaches to thinking through the, perhaps unexpected, entanglement of pleasure and politics. We wil consider happiness, sexuality, humor, and cuteness, among other pleasurable concepts. Our readings will come from affect theory, queer theory, critical race theory, aesthetic theory, and Marxist theory, alongside selected literary and visual texts. Our goal will be to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the role of pleasure in topics including identity politics, social movements, fetishism and exploitation, oppression and injustice and the fights against these things.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites refer to the English Program section titled, “Advanced Courses”.
  
  • ENGL 372 - Contemporary Literary Theory: Post-Modernity and Imagination

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course is about developments in literary theory in the context of the last 35 years of American intellectual and artistic culture. Our concern will be understanding literary theories in their historical and institutional contexts as well as considering their value as ways of thinking about literature and art. We’ll pay particular attention to the impact of post-structuralism on American critics, the relation of literary criticism to cultural criticism, and various elaborations of the idea of post-modernity. American, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290, ENGL 275/CMPL 200, or ENGL 299, or any two 200-Level English courses, or consent of the instructor.
    This course is cross-listed with CINE 372, CMPL 372


  
  • ENGL 375 - Realism: Mirror Up to Nature

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    Realism, though not the radical project it was, remains a significant part of contemporary culture. The tension between accurate reproduction of ‘reality’ and the creation of meaningful aesthetic form gives Realism its dynamic quality. Realism negotiates between the possibilities and limitations of representation in media such as the novel, drama, painting, photography, cinema, and television. The course will explore what realism was and its legacy, drawing from American, British, Irish, French, Italian, and Russian traditions.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENGL 299 or two 200-Level courses. Also acceptable: CINE 111 and a Cinematic Traditions Course, CINE 299, CMPL 200, or ENGL 275. Requirements can be waived with instructor consent.
    This course is cross-listed with CINE 375, CMPL 376


  
  • ENGL 377 - Migrants and Postcolonial Novels

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Central to the postcolonial novel is the global experience of migration with a spectrum of identity markers, such as, class, race, gender, and sexuality. The novels track distinct migratory trends. The Asian and Caribbean migration to Britain will be explored through Hanief Kureishi’s The Black Album (1995), Zadie Smith’s White Teeth (2000), and Andrea Levy’s Small Island (2004). Also we will read V. S. Naipaul’s A Bend in the River (1979) - a novel about migrant lives caught up in postcolonial violence, and Amitav Ghosh’s Gun Island (2019) that explore climate migrants in continental Europe.
  
  • ENGL 379 - Welfare Queens and Tiger Moms: Narratives of the Maternal

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    This course reads the cultural politics of the maternal in contemporary American literature. It explores, in particular, the role that the maternal occupies within narratives of migration, nationalism, and globalization. It analyzes how categories like race, gender, sexuality, and class infuse meaning into the maternal to whom we ascribe maternal roles; how labor (reproductive and productive) manages and is managed by the maternal; and the significance of the nuclear family unit and its alternatives. Rather than asking us to make claims about maternal figures in our own lives, the course demands distance, an alienating gesture that enables a critical knowledge.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENGL 299 or two 200-Level courses. Requirements can be waived with instructor consent.
  
  • ENGL 381 - Hopeful Monsters: (Mixed-)Media Studies

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course looks at hybrid media forms across historical, national and aesthetic boundaries. What happens when generally distinct aesthetic forms and practices are merged? What do they reveal about the nature of the original media they are constructed from? How is interpretive activity challenged by such works? Our objects of study will include visual art, experimental poetry, innovative memoir, essay-films, narrative and documentary cinema, graphic and experimental fiction and more. American, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled `Advanced Courses.’ Also acceptable: CINE 110 or CINE 111 and a Cinematic Traditions Course, OR CINE 299.
    This course is cross-listed with CINE 381


  
  • ENGL 383 - Selected Authors: Vladimir Nabokov

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    A close reading of Vladimir Nabokov’s short fiction, autobiography, and the major novels from Despair through Transparent Things by this great 20th-century author.
  
  • ENGL 385 - Women in/and “Bollywood”

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course will examine how gender and sexuality, especially as they relate to women, are represented in “Bollywood” cinema. Focusing on individual films, it will analyze: 1) their cinematic techniques and narrative forms for representing women and addressing issues of gender and sexuality (which identities are privileged, which marginalized? what values structure the film’s diegetic world?); and (2) spectatorial address (what sort of gendered, classed, and caste-marked viewer constitutes the film’s desired audience?). Anglo-American and Indian film scholarship, some deriving from feminist and queer studies, and scholarship relevant to the films’ historical and cultural contexts will inform our discussion. Diversity, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled “Advanced Courses.”
  
  • ENGL 391 - European Modernism and the World

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Between 1880 and 1930, Europe was convulsed by wars, technological advances, and social transformations. Writers and artists responded by creating revolutionary new forms, techniques, and movements – such as Cubism, Dadaism, and Surrealism – and their innovations carried philosophical, political, and aesthetic models across the 20th-century world. We will study why and how certain non-European authors received, rejected, and/or recombined central aspects of European Modernism. Diversity, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENGL 275/CMPL 200 or ENGL 299, or any two 200-Level English courses.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 391


  
  • ENGL 392 - Unsettling Manifest Destiny: The Western as World Literature

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This class explores the literature, art, and popular culture that emerges out of the contested and unceded regions we now call the North American west. From the sixteenth-century through the nineteenth-century, the west was one of the most contested-and quickly globalizing-regions of the world. Over this period of time, Indigenous peoples, white settlers, and Black and Asian Americans, among others, wrote, drew, and performed histories of their place within that contested world for audiences on a world stage. We will read literature ranging from early European travel narratives in the Americas to accounts of Indigenous American delegations to Europe, and from biographies, popularized adventure tales, and poetry of nineteenth century resistance leaders such as Joaquin Murieta, Geronimo, Zitkala-sa, to some of the earliest “Western” novels. Alongside this literature, we will examine visual and performance art representing the “American West” for global audiences, ranging from the ledger book art of Howling Wolf and Sitting Bull, to the European tour of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show and twentieth-century Italian western movies. We will ask: what is “the Western”? Who participates in the emergence and shaping of the genre? And where is its place in the “world”? Assignments will include archival research and creative project options.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Recommended having taken one English class prior.
  
  • ENGL 398 - Advanced Research in the Humanities

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    A project-based course that allows students to identify and explore potential applications of literary study and the humanities in general. Projects can investigate possible careers for English majors, research on literature, English education, advanced writing practices, preparation for capstone courses.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Any two 200-Level ENGL courses or consent of the instructor.
  
  • ENGL 399 - Teaching and Tutoring Writing Across the Disciplines

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    In this course, students study composition theory and pedagogy and at the same time learn to work with their peers as writing associates. In the process of helping to educate others, students work toward a fuller understanding of their own educational experiences, particularly in writing.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Experienced students of all majors who write well are encouraged to apply. Closed to first-years and to seniors in their final semester. Students must apply to take this course before early registration; applications are linked from the Writing Associates Program’s webpages.
    This course is cross-listed with WRCM 401


    Community Based Learning
  
  • ENGL 400 - Senior Tutorial

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    Senior tutorials offer majors the opportunity to define and pursue a literary project of their own choosing. Course work will include independent reading and research, oral presentations, and various short writing assignments, culminating in a final project of approximately 20 pages. Most of the work on the project will be done independently, and each student is responsible for making appropriate progress. Students are also responsible for supporting each other and providing helpful feedback.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For English majors in either semester of their final year only, involving close work in a small group on an individual project, leading to a substantial paper.
  
  • ENGL 417 - Space and Place

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    The work of cultural geography seems more salient than ever, given the attention to border disputes, climate change, the global economy, and urban development. This seminar, which prepares English majors to exit the program by way of a substantial research project, draws attention to critics (Foucault, Glissant, Harvey, Heidegger, Jameson, Massey, Soja, and more) helping us to understand space and place, in order to establish a foundation for examining textual manifestations of everything from the description of a bedroom to the depiction of interstellar planets and to develop a keener sense of how the spatial provides a meaningful analytic for reading literature and beyond.
  
  • ENGL 428 - Seminar: Virginia Woolf & Zadie Smith

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This seminar puts into a sustained conversation two immensely innovative and hugely influential female authors: Virginia Woolf and Zadie Smith. Situating them in their literary, historical, and theoretical contexts, we will examine the ways in which both authors - one writing at the beginning of the 20th century, the other at the beginning of the 21st - explore in their writings the relationship between literature, history, and politics. Texts might include Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway and The Waves; Smith’s NW and On Beauty, as well as both authors’ diaries and essays. Written work will lead toward an extensive final research project.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Admission based on a completed application form (available at the Department office, Rice130)
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 428


  
  • ENGL 437 - Seminar: Ars Poetica

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    What does it mean to make a poem? What does it mean to make art in any form? What does it mean to make sense of art? What methods and presuppositions shape and influence interpretive work? Central texts will include poetry, criticism, theory, and visual works. Written work will emphasize scrupulous planning and exacting revision. 1700-1900 OR Post-1900 (not both).
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled ‘Senior Tutorials and Seminars.’
  
  • ENGL 438 - Seminar: Literary Cognitive Linguistics

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This seminar serves as a capstone for both English majors and students completing the college concentration in linguistics. Cognitive linguists see language use as a window into the backstage conceptual processes of the mind, though they also centralize the embodiment of speakers in their approaches to language and thought. Since the field privileges semantics (or meaning) rather than structure alone, the seminar begins with shared readings in conceptual metaphor theory, mental space and viewpoint mapping and blending, and related topics. Students will then apply selected ‘cogling’ approaches for analysis or interpretation of a literary text or other language-based figurative work(s). Field trips required. .
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two advanced courses in linguistics and/or English
  
  • ENGL 448 - Seminar: Words and Things

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    An exploration of the philosophy, theory, and intellectual history of literary/aesthetic representation. What is the relationship between creative ideas – even consciousness itself – and expressive language? Sounds and written symbols? Signifier and Signified? Words and Things? Probable theorists include Aristotle, Plato, Auerbach, Bacon, Sidney, Wittgenstein, Eco, Ong, Saussure, Foucault, Derrida, Latour, and a selection of rich literary works that are attentive to poetic and linguistic making as such. Students will be guided through substantive research papers.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled ‘Senior Tutorials and Seminars.’
  
  • ENGL 452 - Honors Project I

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    Intensive year-long work on a topic developed in consultation with a member of the department, culminating in a substantial paper and a defense of that paper.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled, ‘Honors and Private Readings.’
  
  • ENGL 453 - Honors Project II

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    Intensive year-long work on a topic developed in consultation with a member of the department, culminating in a substantial paper and a defense of that paper.
  
  • ENGL 942B - Nature, Culture, London: In, Around, Below, Above, Before, and After the City

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Through a study of a variety of texts and places – museums, maps, literature, parks, paintings, films, gardens, architecture, infrastructure – we will consider the different ways in which nature is understood, ordered, and represented in London and surrounding areas. The way a culture looks at nature is organized by a variety of factors, including its geography, its history, its epistemology and ethos. We will explore various versions of nature in an urban environment, with particular attention to connections: between ideas and places, between texts and experiences, between one place and another, between different cultural perspectives, between the past and the present. Field trips required.  British.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Taught in London. Prior application and acceptance to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.
    This course is cross-listed with ENVS 942B


  
  • ENGL 943 - Words Written on Water

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    An introduction to different meanings of water in British literature. We will study a variety of works – poetry, fiction, non-fiction – beginning with the Romantic period but emphasizing the contemporary. In addition, we will undertake field study of water in its various forms in and around London, from fountains to outfalls, canals to cataracts. Sites will include the Thames; some of the lesser streams and canals in the city; Grasmere and Easedale Tarn in the Lake District; and the River Dart. Through textual and field research we will try to bring out the many meanings of water in 21st-century London. Field trips required. British, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Taught in London. Prior application and acceptance to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.
  
  • ENGL 966B - The London Stage

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Taught in conjunction with ENGL 966A.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Taught in London. Admission to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.
  
  • ENGL 972B - Modernism in England

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Taken in conjunction with ENGL 972A.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Taught in London. Acceptance to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.
  
  • ENGL 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • ENGL 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

English for Speakers of Other Languages

  
  • ESOL 095 - ESOL Practicum

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    A practical skills and application course designed to prepare the student for full participation in the ESOL course sequence. The content of this course focuses on basic grammar skills through one on one instruction, short reading passages to increase vocabulary learning, and short writing assignments designed to introduce the student to college writing concepts.
  
  • ESOL 104 - Music and Academic Vocabulary I

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    This course is for international students looking to create awareness and enhance their music and academic vocabulary. It is a self guided courses that emphasizes vocabulary from Music Theory and Musicology, as well as focusing on morphology of academic vocabulary, and creating understanding of Greek and Latin roots.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • ESOL 105 - Music and Academic Vocabulary in Context II

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    This course is the second part in a sequence for international students looking to advance their command and usage of music and academic vocabulary. It is a self-guided course with peer projects that emphasizes vocabulary from Music Theory and Musicology, as well as focusing on morphology of academic vocabulary, and creating understanding of Greek and Latin roots.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ESOL 104 and Instructor consent required.
  
  • ESOL 110 - ESOL Level 1 Reading, Writing, and Grammar

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    An intensive course designed for new students who are non-native speakers of English and whose experience with the English language is limited. The four language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening) are taught simultaneously with special emphasis on the acquisition of grammar. Students must concurrently enroll in ESOL 115.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Enrollment based on performance on ESOL Placement Exam.
  
  • ESOL 115 - English for Speakers of Other Languages: Speaking, Listening and Culture

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course focuses on speaking and listening skills within the context of American academic culture. This course is open to al students enrolled in ESOL 110, 120, and 130. Students enrolled in ESOL 110 must concurrently enroll in ESOL 115.
    Community Based Learning
  
  • ESOL 120 - ESOL Level 2

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    An intensive course designed to build upon skills developed in ESOL Level 1 and to increase mastery of the basic English language skills at the intermediate and upper-intermediate levels. Prerequisites & Notes Placement by ESOL Placement Exam or successful completion of ESOL 110.
  
  • ESOL 130 - ESOL Level 3

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    An intensive course designed for students who are non-native speakers of English to increase fluency, build rich vocabulary, and practice the use and understanding of idiomatic English. This course will focus on the use of English for academic purposes, and academic writing in particular. Prerequisites & Notes Placement by ESOL Placement Exam or successful completion of ESOL 120.
  
  • ESOL 140 - Expository Writing for English Speakers of Other Languages

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course is designed for English speakers of other languages and international students interested in exploring American Academic conventions by learning to observe the influence of rhetorical structures and read critically, construct and support an argument, and explore and develop research skills. Assignments are designed to involve academic reading, writing, and research that will serve them during their education at Oberlin College and Conservatory and in their professional lives. The course will also help to prepare students for writing about music in academic contexts such as history and theory. This class will meet as a writing community in which students read and discuss their work and the work of classmates. Prerequisites and notes: Placement by ESOL Placement Exam or successful completion of ESOL 130.
  
  • ESOL 190 - Advanced Academic English

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    This first-module course is designed specifically for Arts and Sciences international students with an advanced command of English (suggested TOEFL 100+) who have not used English in academic contexts or have not used English in an academic environment for some time. The course will focus on the development of academic listening, speaking, discussion, and reading skills. This will be done through project-based learning on the ArtiFACT project which uses oral narratives to build understanding across cultures, fostering community engagement and supporting students across campus departments.This course is intended for Arts and Sciences international students with a TOEFL score of 100+ (suggested) or instructor permission.
  
  • ESOL 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private Reading - Full
  
  • ESOL 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private Reading - Half

Entrepreneurship Studies

  
  • ENTR 100 - Intro to Entrepreneurship

    CC
    1 credit
    Intro to Entrepreneurship
  
  • ENTR 102 - Oberlin Business Scholars

    CC
    2 credits
    Students in the course will develop a greater understanding of businesses, business concepts and terminology, and financial analysis and reporting. They will also develop career readiness and job search skills. Culminating experience is a required field trip during spring break, where students will travel to a major city such as New York, Boston, or San Francisco to visit financial organizations and other businesses to apply their knowledge and skills gained in the course.
  
  • ENTR 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC
    4 credits
    Private Reading - Full
  
  • ENTR 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC
    2 credits
    Private Reading - Half

Environmental Studies

  
  • ENVS 101 - Environment and Society

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    An interdisciplinary exploration of environmental challenges, causes, solutions and underlying power dynamics. This course provides an introduction to social, economic, and ecological perspectives on relationships between humans and the rest of the natural world. The course emphasizes design options to transition communities towards sustainability and resilience with respect to food, energy and shelter in the face of local and global change. ENVS 101 provides an introduction for non-majors and a foundation for Environmental Studies majors. Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: First- and second-year students have priority through the first week of registration; seats will open to juniors, seniors, and fifth-year students during the second week of registration through a system-maintained waitlist process.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 170 - Beekeeping: A Cultural and Environmental History

    HC ARHU CD
    2 credits
    Humans have “kept” honeybees for millennia, but have never fully tamed them. This modular course explores our complex relationship with this fascinating semi-domesticated species from a global perspective (Eurasia, Africa, the Middle East, the Americas), with particular emphasis on Russia and the Slavic world, which has an extraordinarily rich beekeeping tradition. Topics include: basic bee biology; wild bees; bee lining; traditional beekeeping, including tree hives, skeps, log hives (we’ll build one!); the development of the movable-frame hives and the rise of industrial apiculture; colony collapse disorder and climate change; new approaches to natural or “bee-centric” beekeeping. Some weekend field trips/activities.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is cross-listed with RUSS 170


    This course is appropriate for new students.
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 201 - Introduction to Environmental Humanities

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course develops students’ capacity to understand how humans conceptualize, interpret, value, and engage with the non-human world. We examine the ways narratives, aesthetic modes, and philosophical systems inform humans’ understanding of the nonhuman world. We engage in close readings of literary, religious, philosophical, visual, and cinematic texts as well as examining current environmental issues from an interdisciplinary humanities perspective.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 101
    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 208 - Environmental Policy

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This course introduces students to the foundations, evolution, actors, content, goals, and future of environmental policies in the U.S. We will contrast federal policies with initiatives in local communities, at the state level, in other countries, and at the international level. By navigating through various levels of governance, this course builds a typology of environmental policies highlighting distinct assumptions, interests, approaches, and agendas of key players in the development and implementation of policy.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: ENVS 101
    Notes: Restricted to ENVS and POLT majors.
    This course is cross-listed with POLT 208


    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 209 - Environmental Repair

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of environmental justice in the context of reparations theory, including reparations for enslavement and climate change.  This course is part of the “Reconstructing the Future” StudiOC learning community.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 209OC - Environmental Repair

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of environmental justice in the context of reparations theory, including reparations for enslavement and climate change.  This course is part of the “Reconstructing the Future” StudiOC learning community. 
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 218 - Dissent

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course will place environmental social movements in historical and theoretical context, examining the aesthetics and politics of dissent with particular attention to performance and expressive cultures.
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 219 - Climate Change

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course investigates the ethics, aesthetics, and politics of climate change through cultural productions including literature, film, new media, performance, protest, and social movements. Throughout this examination we will reflect critically on the narrative resources we have to think through these questions, such as the genres of utopia, dystopia, and apocalypse, and interrogate the portrayal of human nature, risk, and disaster in cultural productions. A central element of the class will be your own response to these questions in the form of an expressive project
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 201 or consent of the instructor.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 220 - Global Agriculture and Food Production

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This course offers a global overview of agriculture and food. We explore the origins and rise of intensified agriculture and the role of colonization, plantations, and forced labor in food supply. We address the recent intensification of agriculture, the Green Revolution, and concerns with hunger, poverty, and sustainable agriculture. We also cover the genetic revolution and the vertical integration of food production systems, eating lower on the food chain, and agro-environmental policy. The course concludes with a consideration of farmer strategies to cope with industrialized agriculture, including erosion in all its forms, water and irrigation issues, and nutrient cycling.
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 221 - The Social and Environmental Consequences of Technology

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This course allows students to critically think about technology and its consequences.  It provides an overview on technology and its role in the world, explores different views on technology and discusses different ways to critically evaluate technologies and the systems behind them.  Is there such a thing as a “good” or a “bad” technology?  How would we determine those characteristics?  Are technologies value-neutral or do they have values embedded in them?  On what basis should we choose one technology over another?  Is it possible to say “no” to a technology nowadays?  Students will explore these questions and the unanticipated consequences of technology via case studies on specific technologies. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 101
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 222 - Environmental Issues Beyond Borders

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Global environmental issues often cut across national boundaries. Forging effective solutions to these problems requires consideration of the cultural, socioeconomic, and political processes that influence the relationship between humans and the natural environment in different parts of the world. This course uses case studies, critical thinking exercises, and projects for the students to develop an understanding of international environmental issues and discover ways in which their personal choices can improve the environment.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 223 - Surviving America: Introduction to Native Studies

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course introduces students to the central themes and issues in Native American and Indigenous Studies. Engaging Indigenous methodologies, students will examine the history, politics, economies, knowledge, and cultures of Indigenous people of the western hemisphere with an emphasis on North America. Tracking the historical persistence and contemporary articulations of Native sovereignties, cultures, and knowledge systems in the context of North American settler colonial state formation this course explores the broad implications these entanglements have for social, political, economic, and environmental justice. Trafficking on a wide array of materials, this course is divided into three sections: “History: Touching on the Past, Looking to the Future,” “Persistence: Indigenous Knowledges, Literatures, and Expressive Cultures,” and “Resurgence: Decolonization as a Framework for Contemporary Social Justice Movements.”
    This course is cross-listed with CAST 223


    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 230 - Environmental Justice and Local Knowledge

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course will engage students in the theory and practice of environmental justice with a particular focus on epistemologies. Interdisciplinary readings will include primary sources like autobiography and documentary film as well as secondary sources from the humanities and social and natural sciences. Field trips required.
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 231 - Environmental Economics

    FC SSCI QFR
    4 credits
    The course is an introduction to the theory and practice of environmental economics. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the basic tools of economic analysis are used to identify sources of environmental problems, value environmental resources, and design environmental policy within the framework of a market based economic system.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ECON 101 or its equivalent.
    This course is cross-listed with ECON 231


    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 302 - American Agricultures

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course examines agrarian thinking and food justice movements in the United States through literature, essays, film, and field trips. We learn about the political philosophy of democratic agrarianism, particularly as articulated by the New Agrarianism movement, and the contributions of indigenous, enslaved, and immigrant peoples to American agricultural practices and foodways. Throughout the course we pay close attention to the Rust Belt as a location of contemporary work for food justice. Field trips are required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 201 or consent of the instructor
    This course is cross-listed with CAST 302


    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 316 - Ecosystem Ecology

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    The ecosystem concept provides a framework for understanding complex interactions between life and the physical environment and the role of humans as dominant agents of biogeochemical change. We will apply systems concepts to understand the flows of energy, cycles of matter and control mechanisms that operate in ecosystems and will compare the structure and function of a variety of natural and human dominated ecosystems. Students will explore primary literature, will learn field and laboratory methods for analyzing local ecosystems, and will propose, execute and analyze group research projects. Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 103 or BIOL 200 and either CHEM 101, 103 or 051.Ecosystem Ecology counts toward Biology and Environmental Studies major requirements.
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 322 - Energy and Society

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Energy issues are often characterized as problems we can ‘supply’ our way out of by changing the resources we rely on. Less frequently, energy issues are treated as a problem of consumption. This course adopts a sociotechnical perspective, regarding energy as an issue shaped by both technical factors and social patterns. The first part of this course explores physical, political, and economic aspects of energy supply through the examination of different energy sources (biomass, fossil fuels, electricity, renewables, nuclear). The second part of the course addresses social and political aspects of energy consumption in the industrial, commercial, residential and transportation sectors.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 101.
    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 323 - Seminar: Global Environmental Politics

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This advanced course focuses on international treaties and negotiations pertaining to the environment at the international level. This course will involve a deep analysis of the texts of some of the major environmental treaties and agreements (or lack of there of) and analyze the socio-political processes surrounding these treaties. We will also look at the broader theoretical issues behind bargaining and negotiations in international environmental politics.
    Prerequisites & Notes: At least Junior ENVS or Politics Major.
    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 324 - Seminar: Natural Resources and Conflict

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This advanced course focuses on the literature on environmental resources and wars. We will look at how natural resources can be deeply enmeshed in engendering conflicts and how natural resources are affected by conflicts. Apart from this we will also look at the methodological and epistemological concerns of how we view the relationship between societal conflicts and natural resources.
    Prerequisites & Notes: At least a Junior, ENVS or Politics Major.
    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 328 - Political Economy of the Environment

    FC SSCI CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course gives students the opportunity to refine their own views on the causes and solutions to environmental problems through the lens of political economy of the environment.  The class looks at the major theories that have been developed to explain nature-society relationships and achieve environmental sustainability.  It will review the foundations of environmental policy, conventional approaches such as administrative rationalism, liberal democracy, and ecological modernization as well as more radical approaches such as Environmental Justice, Ecofeminism and Bio-Regionalism.  Students will use these approaches to analyze a particular environmental issue/policy controversy of their choosing.  
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS/POLT 208 OR ENVS/ECON 231
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 332 - Energy Economics

    FC SSCI QFR
    4 credits
    This course examines energy markets and policies. It applies economic theory and uses empirical evidence to analyze oil, natural gas, and electricity markets. Understanding the structure of supply and demand in these industries is essential for designing effective energy policy. Emphasis will be placed on understanding energy’s interaction with climate change.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ECON 253
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 336 - Practicum in Agroecology at the George Jones Farm Part 1

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Current agricultural methods have been widely recognized as unsustainable, contributing to climate change, reducing biodiversity, depleting soil, and polluting air and water. Agroecology is a field of study and a set of practices that focus on sustainable food production. Through lectures, practical experiences and projects at the George Jones Farm and required field trips this course will provide hands-on experience in the ecology and, to a lesser extent, the economics of small-scale agricultural enterprises. Students will normally combine Part1 (2nd module Spring) with Part2 (1st module Fall). Field Trips Required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 101, BIOL 102 or BIOL 103.
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 337 - Practicum in Agroecology at the George Jones Farm Part 2

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Current agricultural methods have been widely recognized as unsustainable, contributing to climate change, reducing biodiversity, depleting soil, and polluting air and water. Agroecology is a field of study and a set of practices that focus on sustainable food production. Through lectures, practical experiences and projects at the George Jones Farm and required field trips this course will provide hands-on experience in the ecology and, to a lesser extent, the economics of small-scale agricultural enterprises. Students will normally combine Part1 (2nd module Spring) with Part2 (1st module Fall). Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 101, BIOL 102, or BIOL 103.
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 339 - Indigenous Activism, Environmental Justice, and the State

    FC SSCI CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course examines the intersectional scope of Indigenous environmental activism within the broader context and histories of Indigenous sovereignty and decolonial movements in North America. We will examine the centrality of environmental activism to Indigenous sovereignty and treaty rights movements and their relationship to corporate capitalist land appropriation and resource extraction, gender and race based violence, and the role of the settler colonial state. The course centers Indigenous frameworks of political resurgence, politics of decolonization, and visions for an ecologically just and emancipatory alternative to the destructive logics of the settler state.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 201 or equivalent or consent of instructor
    This course is cross-listed with CAST 339


    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 340 - Systems Modeling: Systems Thinking

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Models provide powerful tools for organizing information, gaining insight into underlying dynamics, and predicting the behavior of complex systems. Students will learn to design and build conceptual models together with computer simulation models as a means of building understanding of the common principles underlying a diversity of biological, physical, social and ecological systems. Students will develop ‘systems-thinking’ skills by learning to identify feedback loops controlling the flows and storage of information, energy, money and materials.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 100, BIOL 103, BIOL 200, or BIOL 604; at least one college chemistry course; and comfort using algebraic equations. Credit can be counted towards either biology or environmental studies majors.
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 354 - Practicum in Environmental Communication

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Effective communication is essential for promoting sustainability and resilience. It is also critical to professional development. Through projects that engage the full-diversity of communities, participants will develop skills associated with: pro-environmental and pro-community messaging, compelling visual and text delivery, proposal writing, public education, research and public presentation. The tools of social psychology, communication theory, visual arts and environmental education will be harnessed to motivate and empower community transformation. Projects will focus on further developing and assessing the efficacy of various components of ‘Environmental Dashboard’ (ED) as mechanisms for promoting pro-community attitudes and behaviors. ED components are currently being implemented in Oberlin, Toledo and Cleveland through partners that include the Toledo Public School System, the Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland Metroparks, and many governmental and community organizations in these cities.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 101 or consent of the instructor.
    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 360 - Migration, Refugees & Resilience

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Migration can be either willing or forced. This course focuses on forcibly displaced people (FDP) who migrate from their home communities due to persecution, severe loss of livelihood, or environmental pressures. The first module will deconstruct the nuanced concepts and legal frameworks pertaining to both internal and external displacements. The second module will delve deeper into environmental and climate migration. The third module will cover FDPs who become refugees in a foreign land and are settled in refugee camps. Students will learn about the environmental impacts and responses in refugee camps and explore sustainable and resilient solutions through case studies and projects. The course may include field trips to refugee resettlement areas in NE Ohio depending on college travel policies during/after the Covid-19 pandemic.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS101 (required); ENVS201 (recommended); ENVS 208 (suggested)
    SS Elective
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 385 - Indigenous Nations, Treaty Rights, and the Great Lakes

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course examines the environmental history and contemporary environmental issues of the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada in the context of Indigenous treaty rights, nationhood, and ecological knowledge. We will focus on the legal and political contests over land and resources such as water, fish and game, timber, and rice, along with the implications of environmental degradation and climate crisis. The course centers struggles for Indigenous sovereignty as central to understanding the history and contemporary issues surrounding the Great Lakes by tracking contests over treaty rights, tribal economic development, inter-tribal organizing, education and the implementation of traditional ecological knowledge, and environmental activism.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 201 or equivalent or consent of instructor
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is cross-listed with CAST 385


    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 390 - Sustainable Cities

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Humans are now an urban species with more people living in cities than in rural areas. This course will examine the economic, social and environmental causes and implications of this transition. We will consider the opportunities and design challenges of urban sustainability, concepts and techniques of urban and regional analysis, and contemporary approaches to sustainable urban planning and design. One or two weekend field trips are required for this course. In a global and cross-cultural context.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 101 and consent of instructor.
    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 432 - Seminar in Energy and Environmental Economics

    FC SSCI QFR WADV
    4 credits
    This seminar examines energy and environmental economics issues, mostly in the U.S. We will discuss carbon and sulfur dioxide emissions in the context of the electricity and automotive industries, as well as the transition to renewable energy. We will consider some of the main government programs that affect pollution, efficiency, and social welfare. Students will write and present an original economics research paper.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ECON 253 and ECON 255
    This course is cross-listed with ECON 432


    Sustainability
  
  • ENVS 501F - Research in Environmental Studies (ARHU) - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (ARHU) - Full
  
  • ENVS 501H - Research in Environmental Studies (ARHU) - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (ARHU) - Half
  
  • ENVS 502F - Research in Environmental Studies (ARHU) - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (ARHU) - Full
  
  • ENVS 502H - Research in Environmental Studies (ARHU) - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (ARHU) - Half
  
  • ENVS 503F - Research in Environmental Studies (NSMA) - Full

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (NSMA) - Full
  
  • ENVS 503H - Research in Environmental Studies (NSMA) - Half

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (NSMA) - Half
  
  • ENVS 504F - Research in Environmental Studies (NSMA) - Full

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (NSMA) - Full
  
  • ENVS 504H - Research in Environmental Studies (NSMA) - Half

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (NSMA) - Half
  
  • ENVS 505F - Research in Environmental Studies (SSCI) - Full

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (SSCI) - Full
  
  • ENVS 505H - Research in Environmental Studies (SSCI) - Half

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (SSCI) - Half
  
  • ENVS 506F - Research in Environmental Studies (SSCI) - Full

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (SSCI) - Full
  
  • ENVS 506H - Research in Environmental Studies (SSCI) - Half

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    Research in Environmental Studies (SSCI) - Half
  
  • ENVS 957 - Climate Change and London: Vulnerability, Mitigation, Adaptation & Resilience

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Energy, water, food, shelter, and transportation are essential to any community.  What plans are underway for London and smaller communities to provide these essential resources in the face of changing weather and rising seas?   Students will develop an understanding of resilience theory and conceptual modeling and apply these to understand the process of change underway.  Tours of public and private sector infrastructure will be key features of this course.  Students will compare and contrast resilience in overlapping systems and at multiple scales.  Collectively, the class will build a public ArcGIS “Story map” that documents and communicates the lessons we learn.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Taught in London. Prior application and acceptance to the Oberlin-in-London Program required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    Sustainability
 

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