Apr 19, 2024  
Course Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Course Catalog 2022-2023 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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This is a comprehensive listing of all active, credit-bearing courses offered by Oberlin College and Conservatory since Fall 2016. Courses listed this online catalog may not be offered every semester; for up to date information on which courses are offered in a given semester, please see PRESTO. 

For the most part, courses offered by departments are offered within the principal division of the department. Many interdisciplinary departments and programs also offer courses within more than one division.

Individual courses may be counted simultaneously toward more than one General Course Requirement providing they carry the appropriate divisional attributes and/or designations.

 

Music History

  
  • MHST 357 - Charles Ives’s Musical Universe

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    This seminar-style course examines the music, writing, and historiography of Charles Ives, an enigmatic figure in American musical history. We will examine Ives’s use of borrowed melodies and their meanings, his connections to philosophy (especially but not exclusively New England transcendentalism), his unique writings, analysis of his works, his career in- and outside music, his cultural milieu and relationship to American society, and his reception both during and after his life. Activities will include in-depth reading, stylistic analysis, class presentations and discussion. Significant attention will be paid to developing individual research projects.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MHST 101 and one 200-level Music History course are suggested. ESOL 130 or testing equivalent is required of International students.
  
  • MHST 360 - Jazz & Media Studies Through the Neumann Archive

    FC CNDP DDHU CD
    4 credits
    This course will explore the broad ramifications of the “archival turn.” Coursework will intertwine two primary curricular activities: (1) an interdisciplinary survey of recent writings including archival theory, postcolonial studies, and African American literature studies, and (2) hands-on engagement with the James R. and Susan Neumann Jazz Collection. Students will curate a public exhibit of materials from the collection. In the process, students investigate challenging questions such as: evaluating the nature and function of archives; assessing the importance of inclusion, exclusion, and usage of objects, physical documentation, and ephemera; and archives as a potential platform for under-recognized constituencies.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 200-level MHST or 200-level ETHN course.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • MHST 361 - Robert Schumann

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    Robert Schumann
  
  • MHST 362 - Music, Politics, and the Western Canon, c.1800

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    The world was no less plagued with conflict than it is today in the decades around the year 1800; rebellion, war, and migration engulfed Europe and the globe. While historians have closely examined the social political events of the period between Mozart’s death and the rise of Beethoven, its music has received only cursory attention by comparison. But the music created during this turbulent and transformative era would prove crucial in the development of the Western musical canon. This interdisciplinary course examines the intersections of music, politics, and aesthetics to understand more completely the formative years of the Western canon.Pre-requisites: One two-hundred level course in music history or the consent of the instructor.
  
  • MHST 400 - Senior Honors

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    For additional information, see ‘Undergraduate Programs,’ Division of Musicology.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Note: Open only to music history majors admitted to the Honors Program.
  
  • MHST 401 - Senior Honors

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    For additional information, see ‘Undergraduate Programs,’ Division of Musicology.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Note: Open only to music history majors admitted to the Honors Program.
  
  • MHST 420 - Stephen Sondheim

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    An introduction to the major works of Stephen Sondheim, focusing on his collaborations with Arthur Laurents (West Side Story , Gypsy , Anyone Can Whistle ), Harold Prince (Company , Follies , A Little Night Music , Pacific Overtures , Sweeney Todd , Merrily We Roll Along ), and James Lapine (Sunday in the Park with George , Into the Woods , Passion ). Topics will include Sondheim’s interpretation of the Rodgers-and-Hammerstein musical, the development of the so-called “concept” musical, and his legacy today. Required viewings outside class time.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One 200-level course in MHST, MUTH 132, and consent of the instructor. ESOL 130 or testing equivalent is required of International students.
    This course is cross-listed with CMUS 420


  
  • MHST 503 - Music of Tudors

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    This seminar focuses on music from c. 1500 to c. 1700 with particular attention to the intertwining of musical style, social function, and monarchial agenda. The repertory under consideration will include the music of the Eton Choirbook, early Tudor songbooks, liturgical works of Tallis and Byrd, Jacobean masque, and sacred, instrumental, and dramatic works by Henry Purcell. An introduction to primary sources will also inform class discourse.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Graduate standing or the consent of the instructor.
    This course is cross-listed with MHST-303


  
  • MHST 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Private Reading - Full
  
  • MHST 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    Private Reading - Half

Music Literature

  
  • MLIT 212 - The Organ Works of Olivier Messiaen

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    This course will explore the organ compositions of Olivier Messiaen as a lens through which we discover the techniques that comprise his musical language and the varied influences upon it. We will examine the organ works through a combination of theoretical analysis, historical contextualization, and comparison with other instrumental and vocal works in Messiaen’s oevre, seeking to understand the composer as both an innovator and a “dazzled believer.” “I’m not a theorist - only a believer dazzled by the infinity of God!” (Olivier Messiaen)
  
  • MLIT 213 - Organ Literature, History and Design

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    An historical survey of organ literature from the 15th century to the present, together with a study of the technical and aesthetic aspects of the organ as an instrument. Semester one covers the period up to 1750; semester two, 1750 to the present. This course will include outside reading and listening assignments as well as analysis and performance projects by members of the class.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Offered in alternate years; required of all organ majors. Prerequisites: MUTH 132 and MHST 101 or the equivalent.
  
  • MLIT 214 - Organ Literature, History and Design

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    An historical survey of organ literature from the 15th century to the present, together with a study of the technical and aesthetic aspects of the organ as an instrument. Semester one covers the period up to 1750; semester two, 1750 to the present. This course will include outside reading and listening assignments as well as analysis and performance projects by members of the class.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Offered in alternate years; required of all organ majors. Prerequisites: MUTH 132 and MHST 101 or the equivalent.
  
  • MLIT 215 - Piano Literature

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    MLIT 215 is an in-depth examination of piano literature from the acceptance of the fortepiano in late 18th century Vienna to the key role of the piano as a symbol of Romantic efflorescence in the mid-1840’s. MLIT 216 is a continuation of the study of piano literature from the invention of the ‘recital’ to the piano’s multiple meanings in the 20th century.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: MHST 101 and MUTH 231 (can be taken concurrently) or consent of the instructor.
  
  • MLIT 216 - Piano Literature

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    MLIT 215 is an in-depth examination of piano literature from the acceptance of the fortepiano in late 18th century Vienna to the key role of the piano as a symbol of Romantic efflorescence in the mid-1840’s. MLIT 216 is a continuation of the study of piano literature from the invention of the ‘recital’ to the piano’s multiple meanings in the 20th century.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: MHST 101 and MUTH 231 (can be taken concurrently) or consent of the instructor
  
  • MLIT 220 - The Lied

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Lied performance, with emphasis on language, style, and the partnership between voice and keyboard. Some consideration of historical background and poetic sources, as well as outside listening and reading. For singers and pianists. Offered in alternate years. This course may count as an accompanying or an ensemble credit for pianists.Pre-requisite and Notes: One semester of German. (May be waived for pianists.)
  
  • MLIT 221 - The Mélodie

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    The performance of French art song, with emphasis upon language, style, and the partnership between voice and keyboard. Some consideration of historical background and poetic sources, as well as outside listening and reading. For singers and pianists. This course may count as an accompanying or an ensemble credit for pianists.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: A semester of French (may be waived for pianists). Consent of instructor is required.

Music Theory

  
  • MUTH 031 - Music Theory Summer Jumpstart

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    This course is intended for incoming Conservatory students desiring additional preparation for the Music Theory sequence, and for incoming Arts and Sciences students who are interested in studying music at Oberlin. Students who have scored below 80% on the Online Theory Placement Exam are strongly encouraged to enroll; those who scored above 80% are not eligible for the class. If you have not yet taken the placement test, please do so online.Prerequisites and notes: Must be an incoming Oberlin student. Those who scored above 80% on the Theory Placement Test are not eligible for the class.
  
  • MUTH 101 - Aural Skills I

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    Development of aural understanding through singing, conducting, improvisation, and listening. The melodic line, simple two-line combinations, rhythmic phrases, scales and triads, tonic predominant and dominant arpeggiation, diatonic intervals, simple and compound meters, treble and bass clefs, cadences, phrases, sentences and periods.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Placement by Aural Skills/Sight-Singing Test 1. ESOL 120 (for students in ESOL sequence). Preference given to students for whom aural skills is a required subject.
  
  • MUTH 102 - Aural Skills II

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    A continuation of MUTH 101. Arpeggiation of all diatonic triads, the leading-tone seventh chord, and the Neopolitan and augmented-sixth chords; major-minor mode mixture; tonicization of or modulation to V in major and III in minor, diatonic sequences, more elaborate divisions of the beat, polyrhythm, small binary forms, introduction to the alto clef.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 101 or placement by Aural Skills/Sight-Singing Test 1. ESOL 120 (for students in ESOL sequence) Preference given to students for whom aural skills is a required subject.
  
  • MUTH 110 - General Music Theory for Non-Majors

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    This is an introductory music theory course for students in the arts and sciences. Topics will include basics of notation, scales, keys, chords, and intervals; aural comprehension of musical forms; style analysis; expressive text setting; connections between music and other art forms; and other topics determined according to the interests of those enrolled.
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course is not intended for Conservatory Majors.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • MUTH 120 - Introduction to Music Theory

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    This intensive and immersive course is designed to build fluency with melodic and rhythmic notation. Students will gain fluency with key signatures and collections, scales, intervals, harmony, clefs, time signatures, and types of meter; will learn better to hear, read, notate, analyze, and perform characteristic melodic and rhythmic structures; explore different analytical strategies for analyzing works from diverse repertoires; and hone their skills listening to, writing about, and interpreting music. Upon successful completion of the course students will be equipped to enter the curriculum.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Placement by Music Theory Placement Test 1. ESOL 120 (for students in ESOL sequence) Preference given to students for whom music theory is a required subject.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • MUTH 130 - Intensive Music Theory I

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Intensive review of the rudiments of music including: clefs, notation, meters and their signatures; key signatures, scales, intervals, triads, and seventh chords. Tonic, dominant, leading-tone, subdominant, and supertonic triads; the dominant-seventh chords (including inversions); and the cadential six-four chord. Introduction to phrase and period structure. Meets five days per week.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Placement by Music Theory Placement Test 1. ESOL 120 (for students in ESOL sequence) Co-requisite: MUTH 101. Preference given to students for whom music theory is a required subject.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • MUTH 131 - Music Theory I

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to music analysis. It will build vocabulary and interpretive frameworks in the dimensions of pitch, rhythm & meter, timbre, phrase models, and small formal structures. At the end of the course, students will be able to apply these vocabularies and frameworks to musics they perform and to musics unfamiliar to them.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Placement by Music Theory Placement or MUTH 120. ESOL 120 (for students in ESOL sequence). Preference given to students for whom music theory is a required subject.
  
  • MUTH 132 - Music Theory II

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    This course aims to deepen musical understanding. It will explore the principles of repetition and variation, departure and return, and expressive intensification in a variety of musical repertoires, building on the tools and vocabularies developed in MUTH 131. At the end of the course, students will be able to communicate nuanced interpretations of musics they perform and musics unfamiliar to them.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 131 Music Theory I.
  
  • MUTH 150 - Music and the Mind

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Music can get your body in motion, your mind lost in memories and mired in nostalgia, or afflict you with an ear-worm. It has the power to communicate intense emotions and evoke moods and sensations. Why is it that the human-music-connection is so strong? this course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of music cognition and will focus on the human experience of music by engaging research from cognitive, social, and developmental psychology. We will focus on topics such as musical expertise and creativity, expressive musical performance, musi
  
  • MUTH 201 - Aural Skills III

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    A continuation of MUTH 102. Imitation, diatonic modulation to all closely related keys, chromatic modulation, aural analysis of short pieces, more complex meters, the tenor clef.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 102 or placement by Aural Skills/Sight-Singing Test 3. ESOL 120 (for students in ESOL sequence)Preference given to students for whom aural skills is a required subject.
  
  • MUTH 202 - Aural Skills IV

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    septuplets, unequal beats, all chromatic simple and compound intervals from any degree of the scale, aural analysis of longer pieces, improvisation emphasizing memorization and sense of form, score reading with at least two simultaneous C clefs, score memorization.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 201 or placement by Aural Skills/Sight-Singing Test 3. ESOL 120 (for students in ESOL sequence) Preference given to student for whom aural skills is a required subject.
  
  • MUTH 210 - Eurhythmics

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    A study of music based on the principles of Emile Jaques-Dalcroze that engages the moving body to develop the perception of rhythm, melody, phrasing, and form. Other emphases include internalization of the rhythmic sense, development of precision in ensemble work and of physical coordination as it applies to the student¿s performing medium. The class focuses on three components: movement-to-music, solfege-eurhythmics, and improvisation.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: MUTH 130 or 131 and MUTH 101, or the equivalent.
  
  • MUTH 231 - Music Theory III

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Continuation of MUTH 132, including diatonic and chromatic modulation; introduction to sonata form. Analytical and writing skills are developed.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132 or a passing score on Music Theory Placement Test 3. ESOL 120 (for students in ESOL sequence) .Preference given to students for whom music theory is a required subject.
  
  • MUTH 232 - Music Theory IV

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Continuation of MUTH 231 emphasizing chromatic harmony and techniques of 20th-century music.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 231, or a passing score on Music Theory Placement Test 4. ESOL 120 (for students in ESOL sequence) Preference given to students for whom music theory is a required subject.
  
  • MUTH 250 - Crafting Tonal Harmony

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Chromatic harmony and tonal forms are explored through analysis and model composition.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132 Music Theory II.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • MUTH 251 - Cycles

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    This course will use as its springboard collections of music that cycle through all of the major and minor keys. Spanning from the eighteenth century to modern day, the repertoire to be studies includes compositions by J.S. Bach, Frederich Chopin, Charles-Valentin Alkan, Alexander Scriabin, Dmitri Shostakovich, Paul Hindemith, Nikolai Kapustin, and Lera Auerbach. We ill explore and learn about: form and harmony in preludes, fugues, and etudes; various ways composers interpret ‘key’ and ‘tonality’; methods of delineating large-scale structure; and the fusion of jazz and classical forms. Coursework will include several short assignments as well as two substantial projects.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132 Music Theory II.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • MUTH 252 - Deciphering Orchestral Scores: Score Reading, Orchestration, Timbre, Organology

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    In this course we will study and analyze “big” multi-instrumental works from the last 300 years. Student will have the opportunity to hone a number of “practical” musicianship skills such as transposition, clef-reading, “reducing” orchestral scores at the keyboard, conducting, and orchestration/arranging. We will also delve into “theoretical” topics such as the history of instrumentation, the structure and evolution of musical instruments (“organology”), acoustics, and the aesthetics of timbre and tone color.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132 Music Theory II.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • MUTH 254 - Partimento and Figured-Bass Realization

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    In this course we will study the centuries-old craft of generating complete works of tonal music from “partimenti,” which are bass-line sketches used to guide the improvisation (“realization”) of a composition at the keyboard. Although the course will focus on composing and improvising, we will also use partimento “schemata”–stock figured-bass patterns–as tools for analyzing galant-era and Classical-era pieces.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132 Music Theory II.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • MUTH 255 - Topics in Nineteenth-Century Music

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    In this course, we will study chromatic harmony, form, and text-music relationships in keyboard, art song, chamber, and symphonic music from the Romantic era.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132, ESOL 120
  
  • MUTH 260 - Large Forms

    FC CNDP PT
    4 credits
    This course primarily investigates how large-scale pieces are organized. As a secondary goal, it encourages students to consider which musical parameters (texture, dynamic, meter, rhythm, harmony, melody, etc.) are important in the work, and how those parameters contribute to the form. It investigates solo, chamber, and symphonic works from 1780 to the present day.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132, ESOL 120
  
  • MUTH 261 - Polyphonies

    FC CNDP PT
    4 credits
    Exploration of traditional and contemporary polyphonic musics, with a focus on techniques of combining independent voices. Repertoire is drawn from pretonal, tonal, post-tonal, and extra-canonical sources. Topics include imitative polyphonies, traditional drone polyphonies, ostinato polyphonies and polyrhythms, and post-tonal polyphonic techniques illustrated through 20th- and 21st-century choral works. (This course offers the Post-Tonal (PT) attribute)
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132 Music Theory II.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • MUTH 262 - Questioning Genius

    FC CNDP PT
    4 credits
    This course questions who is allowed to be a genius, and explores what it takes to be considered a genius. It studies music by so-called geniuses from a wide variety of genres, focusing on developing analytical skills appropriate to each genre. Students will engage with questions of form, bass lines, melody, and timbre. They will also develop a deeper understanding of canon formation. 
  
  • MUTH 263 - Scales, Sets, Series, Spectra

    FC CNDP PT
    4 credits
    The course covers a range of 20th - and 21st - century musical techniques. Student will learn to recognize a variety of post-tonal pitch structures and processes, through listening, analysis, model composition, and writing.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132, ESOL 120
  
  • MUTH 264 - Art Song from Franz Schubert to Margaret Bonds

    FC CNDP PT
    4 credits
    How do composers set texts to music? How do performers participate in the conversation between poet and composer? How did contemporary audiences hear and interpret these performances? Ths course explores the rich musical, poetic, and cultural worlds surrounding 19th-century German Lieder (Schubert, Hensel, Robert Schumann, Lang, Clara Schumann, and others) and 20th-century art song composed by African Americans (Burleigh, Price, Still, Bonds, and others). Students will develop music-analytical skills drawn from 19th and 20th -century traditions, including spirituals, jazz, and post-tonal techniques. Midterm and final projects may include analytical writing, archival work and music editing, performance, and creative work.  (This course offers the Post-Tonal (PT) attribute)
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132 Music Theory II.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • MUTH 265 - Music In Time

    FC CNDP PT
    4 credits
    This course will focus on temporal aspects of music. We will be guided by a distinction between rhythm–defined as patterns of duration–and meter–defined as layered periodicity. Topics under rhythm will include rhythmic motives, expressive microtiming, pitch-rhythm isomorphisms and tempo. Meter topics include metrical dissonance, non-isochronous periodicity, limits of perception and metrical malleability. The repertoire will include popular and art-music from Europe, Africa, Asia, and North and South America. In addition to weekly homework and discussions, all students will complete a final project on a topic of their choice.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132 Music Theory II.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • MUTH 301 - Aural Skills V

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    A continuation of MUTH 202. Chromatic and atonal materials, ametric compositions, more complex polyrhythms and meter changes, introduction to the soprano clef, score reading involving transposing instruments.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: MUTH 202 or placement by Aural Skills/Sight-Singing Test 3. Preference given to students for whom aural skills is a required subject.
  
  • MUTH 312 - Music by Women

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    This is an analysis course that focuses primarily on music created by women. Relevant means of creation include composition, sound design, arranging, production/engineering, sampling, dj-ing, improvising, and otherwise performing. Repertoire will include examples selected by the instructor and suggested by enrolled students, with no prescribed chronological or geographical limits. Interpretive analysis will apply a framework developed by the instructor, combined with specialized approaches from the bibliography. For non-music majors, no familiarity with traditional Western music theory is expected. Daily work will include readings, listenings, discussions, and written analysis. The culminating assignment will be a 3,000-word term paper.Prerequisite and notes: B.M.: MUTH 202 and 232. B.A. in Music: MUTH 201 and 231. All others: 2nd-year or later.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 312


  
  • MUTH 314 - Music & Emotion

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    Music & Emotion
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two courses in MUTH 250-299 for students that matriculated 202109 and after.
  
  • MUTH 315 - Listening to & Analyzing Rock

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    Listening to & Analyzing Rock
  
  • MUTH 316 - Tonality in Early Music

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    In this course, we will investigate tonal structure in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century music, studying such diverse repertoire as the frottola, metrical psalmody, Baroque guitar tablature, Monteverdi’s madrigals, and J.S. Bach’s chorales. Using the Selch Collection’s extensive holdings of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century music and music theory books, we will gain familiarity with Renaissance-era notation and sources, and we will explore the benefits and limitations of using Renaissance music theory to analyze Renaissance music. By studying large groups of related pieces-corpora-we will explore the compositional decisions and listening strategies that govern so- called “pre-tonal” repertoires. Pre-requisites: MUTH 231 Music Theory III.
  
  • MUTH 317 - Music and Embodied Cognition

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    This course examines the relationship between musical experience (performing and listening), conceptualization, and meaning. The approach is interdisciplinary, with readings from or based on perception and cognition, human evolution, cognitive linguistics, musicology (history and theory), philosophy, and identity performance. Written coursework includes responses to readings, analysis of works and styles, and a term paper. In addition to Western classical music we will focus on jazz, folk, popular music (broadly conceived, e.g., Björk, Kendrick Lamar, etc.), and as many other kinds of music as time allows.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: Junior standing and instructor consent.
  
  • MUTH 319 - Analyzing Renaissance Music

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    In this course, we will gain familiarity with analytical techniques suitable for sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century music. We will learn to interpret sixteenth-century notation (including mensural notation and tablature), we will study sixteenth-century music theory, and we will explore pedagogical and analytical tools like solmization, counterpoint, mode, chromaticism, text setting, and rhetoric. We will discuss approaches to historical performance practice and historically-informed music analysis. Coursework will include performing from period sources, creation of a modern edition, and analysis of compositions by composers like Josquin des Prez, Orlando di Lasso, William Byrd, Claudio Monteverdi, and Francesca Caccini.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two courses in MUTH 250-299 (For students that matriculated 202109 and later).
  
  • MUTH 320 - Music Analysis as Literature

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    The point of this course is to gain practice reading music-analytical texts (broadly construed) as though they were literature (because they are). One thing that this means is that we will attend closely to matters of prose style, authorial voice, metaphorical and poetic devices, argumentative strategy, and literary genre as we study some of the “classics” of music analysis and criticism as well as publications of more recent vintage. Another thing that it means is that we will examine the social, historical, ideological, economic, and philosophical contexts in which the practice of music analysis is and has been carried out. We will strive to engage with music analysis in a way that is charitable and appreciative as well as critical and, when appropriate, skeptical. Our readings will include a diverse array of historical and contemporary music analyses, selections from Terry Eagleton’s “Literary Theory” (which will be our “textbook”), and a bit of “ordinary language philosophy” (Wittgenstein, Austin, and Ryle). A priority of this course is to foreground music that has traditionally been excluded from the “Western canon.”
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two courses in MUTH 250-299 for students that matriculated 202109 and after.
  
  • MUTH 325 - Counterpoint

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    A species approach to strict counterpoint, designed to acquaint students with fundamental voice-leading techniques of music from the 16th through the 19th century. The course explores the foundations of counterpoint, through the five species; students study contrapuntal techniques through two- and three-part written exercises, class discussion, and two-part dictation. Students examine passages from the literature to ascertain the relationship of strict counterpoint to free composition.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 232; or two courses in MUTH 250-299 for students who matriculated 202109 and after.
  
  • MUTH 326 - Ravel

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    Ravel’s music is inspired both by that of his contemporaries and by such diverse influences as gamelan music, Russian octatonicism, Basque fold music, orientalism, jazz, and the writings of Edgar Allan Poe. His harmonic language, though overall tonal at least in his early works, combines non-tonal elements-such as symmetrical chords drawn from nondiationic collections-with complex dissonant diatonic harmonies. While his forms are creative adaptations of older models from the Baroque and Clssical periods, his sophisticated motivic and thematic ideas and their transformations owe much to the spirit of the early twentieth-century. This course traces the various sourcs on which Ravel drew for inspiration and explores why, despite the diversity of his models, Ravel always sounds unmistakably like Ravel. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 232; or two courses in MUTH@250-299 for students who matriculated 202109 and after.
  
  • MUTH 327 - Shostakovich

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    For additional information, see “Undergraduate Programs,” Division of Musicology.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Note: Open only to music history majors admitted to the Honors Program.
  
  • MUTH 340 - Form and Analysis

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    A course developing techniques of analysis that apply to standard tonal forms. Structural principles underlying the binary, ternary, rondo, and sonata forms (including the concerto) are studied in detail.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 232; or two courses in MUTH 250-299 for students who matriculated 202109 and after.
  
  • MUTH 342 - Rhythmic Theory

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    This course introduces several topics in contemporary rhythmic theory. Emphasis is placed on analytical skills applicable to performance. The first module focuses on metric hierarchy in tonal music. Topics include the distinction between grouping and meter, hypermeter, metric dissonance/resolution, and the relation between metric and tonal hierarchies. The second module covers contemporary and world-music repertoires, and focuses on non-hierarchical metric structures. Topics include irregular pulses, stable polymeters, phase shifts, mensural theories, and simple mathematical models.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 232; or two courses in MUTH 250-299 for students that matriculated in 202109 and after.
  
  • MUTH 344 - Analyzing Beethoven’s Middle Period Music

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    The primary goal of the class is engage deeply with Classical forms by studying symphonies, piano sonatas, and string quartets from Beethoven’s middle period (approx. 1803-14). Students will become well versed in William Caplin’s Classical Form: A Theory of Formal Functions (1998) and James Hepokoski and Warren Darcy’s Elements of Sonata Theory (2006). They will also be exposed to analytical ideas of Janet Schmalfeldt, Fred Lerdahl and Ray Jackendorff, Heinrich Schenker, and Scott Burnham, among others. The primary output will be three analytical papers on full-movement forms; these are designed to help students gain a critical understanding of the vocabulary and compositional strategies of Beethoven’s middle period.Prerequisites and notes: MUTH 202 and 232. Not open to students who have taken MUTH 340 (Form & Analysis, 343 (String Quartet), or 345 (Mozart.)
  
  • MUTH 360 - Musical Groves

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    Musical grooves are characterized by three primary features: repetition, syncopation, and (at least two) coordinated layers. This course explores what constitutes a groove, what a groove does, and how groove contrasts with other kinds of musical forms. We will consider groove-based music across a wide range of historical styles ranging from Machaut to Mocean Worker, including Ars Antiqua hocket, ground-bass variations, 18th century dance styles, 20th-century ostinatos and loops, minimalisms, and popular musics. Assignments include readings from the recent literature on musical repetition, rhythmic and metric theory, musical entrainment, and musical temporality; listening and writing; score analysis; model composition.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 232; or two courses in MUTH 250-299 for students who matriculated 202109 and after.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • MUTH 361 - The Visible in Music

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    Sound and image are commonly assumed to be discrete concepts, reflecting a fundamental separation of the eye and the ear. Yet visual images play a significant role in musical experience: visual methods of transcription, recording, and analysis have been a feature of musical practice since the invention of notation; musicians frequently collaborate with practitioners in the visual arts in multimedia, opera, film, and theater; and even in “purely musical” works, visual imagery plays a fundamental role in the perception of musical meaning.This course surveys some of the ways that music and visuality interact. The course is divided into three main segments: In the first segment we will evaluate the reputed abstractness of musical sound in light of theories of hybridity and purity. In the second segment we will analyze selected musical works, ranging from C.P.E. Bach to Stravinsky; here our analyses will be informed by a combination of music theories and relevant documents from visual culture. The third segment of the course focuses on some hybrid forms of “eye music” in the 20th century. Students will complete weekly reading, listening, and analysis assignments; three short model-composition exercises; and an individual research project.
  
  • MUTH 362 - French Music from the Belle Epoque, 1871 - 1900

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    In this course, we will examine art music composed in France during the first thirty years of the Belle Époque, from the end of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871 to the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1900. The repertoire will include keyboard and chamber music, orchestra works, mélodies, and operas by composers such as Bizet, Debussy, Dukas, Duparc, Fauré, Franck, Massenet, and Saint-Saëns. We will discuss a variety of analytical techniques that scholars have applied to this repertoire, including theories of harmony, form, narrative, and gender. We will also consider the question of whether there are aesthetic and stylistic elements that mark this music as characteristically “French.” Written work will consist of responses to readings, analyses of selected works, and a final paper.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 232; or two courses in MUTH 250-299 for students who matriculated 202109 and after.
  
  • MUTH 363 - Medieval Motets

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    This course will explore the motet from its origins in the thirteenth century through the death of Guillaume de Machaut (d. 1377). Various analytical approaches to the motet will be studied and applied. Recent topics and debates in modern scholarship concerning the major motet manuscripts, performance practice, musica ficta, function, notation and the role of listening will be examined. Students will complete reading, listening and analytical assignments for each class meeting, as well as mid-term and final projects.Prerequisites and notes: MUTH 232 and MUTH 202
  
  • MUTH 371 - Experimntl Music & Avant Garde

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    MLIT 215 is an in-depth examination of piano literature from the acceptance of the fortepiano in late 18th century Vienna to the key role of the piano as a symbol of Romantic efflorescence in the mid-1840’s. MLIT 216 is a continuation of the study of piano literature from the invention of the “recital” to the piano’s multiple meanings in the 20th century.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: MHST 101 and MUTH 231 (can be taken concurrently) or consent of the instructor.
  
  • MUTH 401 - Graduate Music Theory

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Graduate Music Theory
  
  • MUTH 410 - Senior Project in Theory: Reading

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    Extensive readings in theoretical literature under the supervision of a project supervisor.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Consent of instructor required. Consent from Division Director required for those with junior status. Enrollment Limit: Open only to Music Theory majors with senior or junior status.
  
  • MUTH 411 - Senior Project in Theory: Thesis

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    A major analysis project carried out under the supervision of a project supervisor.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: MUTH 410. Consent of instructor required. Approval of continuation in the Music Theory major from the Division Director is also required. Enrollment Limit: Open only to Music Theory majors .
  
  • MUTH 415 - Analysis & Performance

    FC CNDP, DDHU WINT
    4 credits
    The course focuses on the analysis and performance of tonal and non-tonal music, paying particular attention to the ways in which analysis informs interpretation and performance. Class participation (with opportunities for in-class performance) and several analytical papers are required; writing is a crucial element of the course.
  
  • MUTH 448 - Intro to Schenkerian Analysis

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    An introduction of the theories of Heinrich Schenker throught analysis, reading, lectures, and class discussion. The main sources are Oswald Jonas¿ Introduction and Schenker¿s Five Graphic Music Analyses. Music analyzed is principally from works by composers of the 18th and 19th centuries.
  
  • MUTH 482 - Analysis and Performance

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    A study of music based on the principles of Emile Jaques-Dalcroze emphasizing the development, by means of physical motion, of sensitivity to rhythm, melody, phrasing, form, etc. Other emphases include the internalization of the rhythmic sense and the development of precision in ensemble work and of physical coordination as it applies to the student’s performing medium.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Preference given to Conservatory students and College music majors.
  
  • MUTH 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Private Reading - Full
  
  • MUTH 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    Private Reading - Half

Neuroscience

  
  • NSCI 103 - Environmental Toxicology and Global Health

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course is designed to introduce students to key global public health concepts, the history of public health, and how the core areas of public health can be integrated to promote health at a population level. Students will examine basic concepts of toxicology, environmental science, neuroscience and many others as they apply to the effects of environmental pollutants on diseases. Students will engage in active learning through the use of individual and team activities, discussions, debates, and field experiences. Field trips required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • NSCI 103OC - Environmental Toxicology and Global Health

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course is designed to introduce students to key global public health concepts, the history of public health, and how the core areas of public health can be integrated to promote health at a population level. Students will examine basic concepts of toxicology, environmental science, neuroscience and many others as they apply to the effects of environmental pollutants on diseases. Students will engage in active learning through the use of individual and team activities, discussions, debates, and field experiences. This course is a part of the StudiOC Reconstructing the Future learning community.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • NSCI 108 - Environmental Chemicals in Human Health

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    This course will explore chemical and drug use and abuse in our society. We will discuss the effects of chemicals (therapeutic drugs, pesticides, food additives, herbal remedies, environmental contaminants, and recreational drugs) on humans and other living systems. We will examine how our bodies respond to complex environmental chemicals and how we can use this information to better delineate the cause and prevention of human disease. The course will also discuss federal and state legislations concerning environmental pollution, pesticide use, food and feed additives, consumer protection, occupational exposure to toxic substances, roles of federal regulatory agencies, and alternatives to government control. This course will include a fusion of lectures, discussion, readings from the primary literature, and student presentations. If you are unable to register for this class, you may be placed on a Wait List. If you wish to add your name to the wait list, you must follow these instructions: *Log onto Blackboard *Select ‘Community’ Tab *Go to ‘Organizations & People’ *Click on ‘NSCI 108 Wait List’ on left side of screen and complete the form.
  
  • NSCI 109 - Citizen Neuroscientists

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Science has an influential role in public life (e.g. technology, politics, health care, education), and neuroscience is currently one of the most exciting fields. This interactive course is designed for non-science majors to support your personal development in scientific thinking through the lens of neuroscience. Content will be based on on neuroscience topics of interest, new research findings, and current events (e.g. autism spectrum disorders, neuroimaging, drug addiction, stem cells). All neuroscience content required will be taught in class. Activities include regular readings and discussion, analyzing news articles and scientific publications, and project-based assessments.
  
  • NSCI 110 - How the Brain Works

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Are you interested in how the brain works? This class will cover general Neuroscience concepts: how neurons send signals, major parts of the brain and their functions, as well as movement and memory. Additionally, diseases of the brain like Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy will be covered. Course performance will be evaluated through writing assignments, worksheets, class discussion, and exams.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • NSCI 121 - The Electrochemical basis of EVERYTHING

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    In this class, we make use of case studies to explore and understand the processes underlying how the nervous system develops, interprets the world, learns, stores information, creates thoughts, and initiates behavior. We will work towards understanding how the brain’s structure, chemistry, and function lead to implicit bias, dyslexia, and dementia, and how these issues can be addressed by retraining the brain, chemical intervention, or through BCI.  Additionally, we will engage in some very basic programming of behavior to explore sensory systems and how those systems might influence behavior - i.e. develop a simple stimulus-response model in robots. Discussion and group work will complement lectures.  Expect to spend time scouring the literature for new findings and bringing new ideas to the table!  
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • NSCI 157 - Neuroscience of the Arts

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course examines the neurological basis of the visual arts, musical arts, and culinary arts. We will heavily focus on the perception of art and how the brain allows us to perceive particular sensory features, experience emotions in response to art, and assign aesthetic appraisals. We will also discuss the production of art and how neural plasticity allows for the development of expertise. Lastly, the course will evaluate the neurological basis of creativity, improvisation, and imagination. All scientific knowledge necessary for understanding the material in class will be included; thus, advanced scientific coursework is not required. Field trips required.
  
  • NSCI 175 - Ecological Impacts and Invertebrate Neurobiology

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    The decline of bee populations is a widely known ecological catastrophe, but other invertebrate species are also threatened. This course will go beyond the environmental studies approach to explore the neurobiological impacts of the stressors that ultimately are leading to a decrease in invertebrate populations. Topics may include the effects of pollution, habitat loss, disease, and invasive species on the cognitive function of invertebrates. This course will integrate field observations, discussions, and reading of primary literature.
  
  • NSCI 201 - The Brain: An Introduction to Neuroscience

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    An introductory course in neuroscience that familiarizes students with concepts and information central to work in the neurosciences. Students will learn the basics of brain structure and function at molecular, cellular and systems levels. This foundation will be used to explore a number of behavioral and applied topics.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Before taking this course, it is advisable but not required that students take BIOL 100. Neuroscience majors should consider taking the accompanying laboratory course, NSCI 211.
  
  • NSCI 211 - Neuroscience Laboratory

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    This laboratory exposes students to a variety of research techniques employed by neuroscientists: neuroanatomical procedures for staining and examining brain tissue; physiological procedures for recording the electrical activity of nerve cells; as well as commonly used techniques used to explore brain-behavior relationships (lesions, electrical and chemical stimulation). Some labs use computer simulations.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: Previous or current enrollment in NSCI 201. Notes: P/NP grading. Neuroscience, and Psychology majors given priority.
  
  • NSCI 303 - Advanced Research Methods in Music Perception, Cognition, and Neuroscience

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Music is a powerful human tool that has been used for millennia to entertain, evoke powerful emotions, and effect social change. How does our brain convert information from sound waves into our favorite tune? How does information from other senses enhance our perceptions of music? How does academic research investigate and answer these questions? This lecture/discussion/lab hybrid course will equip students with the knowledge, research background, and laboratory and analysis skillset to understand the foundations of music cognition. Students will design and implement a novel research project to investigate the neural processing of music using psychophysics and electroencephalography. This course seeks to improve students’ ability to think critically and independently; thus, most course activities will center on study design, reading the primary literature, and scientific writing and presenting.  
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201 with a minimum grade of C- or P and consent of the instructor.
  
  • NSCI 303OC - Advanced Research Methods in Music Perception, Cognition, and Neuroscience

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Music is a powerful human tool that has been used for millennia to entertain, evoke powerful emotions, and effect social change. How does our brain convert information from sound waves into our favorite tune? How does information from other senses enhance our perceptions of music? How does academic research investigate and answer these questions? This lecture/discussion/lab hybrid course will equip students with the knowledge, research background, and laboratory and analysis skillset to understand the foundations of music cognition. Students will design and implement a novel research project to investigate the neural processing of music using psychophysics and electroencephalography. This course seeks to improve students’ ability to think critically and independently; thus, most course activities will center on study design, reading the primary literature, and scientific writing and presenting.   This course is part of the StudiOC Learning Community.  
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201 with a minimum grade of C- or P and consent of the instructor.
  
  • NSCI 319 - Neurophysiology: Neurons to Networks to Cognition

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Our brains allow us to perform extraordinarily complicated functions. Neurons both individually and in neural circuits make these functions possible. We will examine how neurons receive, integrate and transmit information and how groups of neurons produce both simple and complex behaviors. Students will analyze and discuss relevant portions of the recent scientific literature.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201 and BIOL 100 or BIOL 604, or consent of instructor. A minimum grade of C- or P is required in the pre-requisites.
  
  • NSCI 321 - Studies in Neuronal Function

    HC NSMA QFR WADV
    2 credits
    Students will investigate how neurons communicate and interact. The first four to six weeks in the laboratory will familiarize the student with methods used to investigate the actions of living neurons and with the design of experiments. The remainder of the semester will focus on the design, performance, and analysis of an original experiment. Students may need to schedule additional laboratory time outside of class to complete their independent experiment.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 211 and previous or concurrent enrollment in NSCI 319 or consent of the instructor.
  
  • NSCI 325 - Neuropharmacology

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    This course introduces students to the neurochemical basis of behavior by focusing on how drugs affect the nervous system and influence behavior. Themes of the course include the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles of drug action and the differential effects of acute and chronic drug administration on both intracellular and intercellular communication. Topics such as pain, sleep, drug addiction and mental illness are used to exemplify the aforementioned themes. This course focuses heavily on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of drug action.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201 with a minimum grade of C-, P, or consent of instructor.
  
  • NSCI 327 - Neuropharmacology Laboratory

    HC NSMA WADV
    2 credits
    This laboratory is designed to introduce students to procedures used to explore the actions of drugs on the nervous system. The lab focuses on biochemical, cellular and behavioral approaches for understanding drug action.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 325 (past or current enrollment), and completed NSCI 211 (current enrollment isn’t sufficient). or consent of instructor.
  
  • NSCI 335 - Neuroimmunology

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Neuroimmunology is the study of the unique immune system of the brain and spinal cord during health and disease. Students will learn how the immune cells of the brain contribute to neuron health, immunological surveillance, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Sample topics include: origin and function of microglia and astrocytes, synaptic pruning of neurons, Alzheimer’s disease, spinal cord injury, and Multiple sclerosis.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201 and 211 with a minimum grade of C- or pass or consent of the instructor.
  
  • NSCI 336 - Research Methods in Neuroimmunology

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Neuroscientists use a variety of techniques to understand the immune system of the brain and spinal cord in order to formulate better strategies for treating diseases such as Multiple sclerosis. Students will use several of the most prevalent techniques to perform in vitro assays that measure the inflammatory response of microglia and astrocytes to bacterial components, observe behavior of Alzheimer?s disease model organisms and examine their tissue for immune cells, and pursue independent study of inflammatory proteins produced by microglia and astrocytes. Techniques will include: Primary culture, ELISA, Immunohistochemistry.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201 with a minimum grade of C- or pass or consent of the instructor.
  
  • NSCI 337 - Neurotoxicology and Neurodegeneration

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    This course examines the pathophysiological link between (i) neurotoxicology, the adverse effects of chemicals, metals, and injurious agents on the nervous system and (ii) neurodegeneration, the progressive neuronal loss observed in many diseases due to aberrant cellular pathways. Topics such as neurotoxicology of the nervous system, biochemical, molecular, developmental neurotoxicology, and the synergism of genes and environment in neurodegenerative diseases are covered. In addition to the assigned readings, students will read, present, and discuss findings from current literature.
  
  • NSCI 338 - Neurotox Neurodegen Laboratory

    HC NSMA WADV
    2 credits
    The laboratory is designed to introduce students to a variety of cellular and molecular techniques and assays used to investigate the effect of neurotoxic metals and other injurious agents on the nervous system. Labs will include topics such as generation and examination of dose-response curves following neurotoxic insult, examination of oxidative stress, and assessment of cell viability in cultured cell lines. Occasionally, students will be required to work outside the scheduled lab period.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 211 and previous or current enrollment in NSCI 337.
  
  • NSCI 343 - Principles of Clinical Neuroscience

    FC NSMA


    4 credits
    Principles of Clinical Neuroscience will provide foundational information about the anatomical and physiological principles of brain functioning, as well as, an overview of the biological bases of major psychological, motor, and neurodegenerative disorders. The course will also dive into known anatomical and physiological mechanisms underlying specific psychological disorders (ex. major depressive and bipolar disorders, and schizophrenia), neurodegenerative diseases (ex. Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases), as well as developmental disorders (ex. Autism Spectrum Disorder). The goal of this course is to help prepare students for health-related fields such as nursing, physical therapy, and medical school.

     
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201, or consent of instructor

  
  • NSCI 344 - Techniques in Clinical Neuroscience

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    The goal of this laboratory course is to introduce students to hands-on techniques, anatomical models, and in-depth case studies that are relevant to Clinical Neuroscience and health related fields. Students will learn about neuroimaging techniques, tract tracing, animal models used to study clinically relevant disorders, diagnosis of brain disorders, and treatment of brain disorders. Additionally, there will be small group discussions, writing assignments, and independent projects. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201, NSCI 211, past or current enrollment in NSCI 343 or Consent of Instructor
  
  • NSCI 357 - Sensory Neuroscience

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    We do not see with our eyes or hear with our ears. Our perceptions result from neural computations carried out by our brains. This course will examine how the neural processing of sensory information results in perception. The focus of the course will be mostly at the neural networks/circuitry level. The course will include fieldtrips to Allen Memorial Art Museum and Conservatory of Music performances to explore how the brain processes art and music.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201 with a minimum grade of C- or P or consent of the instructor.
  
  • NSCI 358 - Sensory Neuroscience Laboratory

    HC NSMA WADV
    2 credits
    This laboratory course will introduce students to some of the methods used to study sensory neuroscience. This course also seeks to improve students? ability to think critically and independently in a laboratory setting. Thus, many of the activities will focus on study design, reading the primary literature, and scientific writing and presenting. Students will also complete independent projects throughout the semester that will require some work outside of class time. We will cover four major areas of sensory neuroscience research: psychophysics, neuro-imaging, electrophysiology, and anatomy.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 211, NSCI 201, and consent of the instructor
  
  • NSCI 360 - Cognitive Neuroscience

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Cognitive neuroscience is the study of the neural basis of cognition, including functions such as perception, decision making, problem solving and language. The strong emphasis in this course will be on understanding the brain circuits that underlie these features of cognition. As a complement to the study of cognitive psychology, the course focuses on the study of brain structure and activity by methods such as electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201 with a minimum grade of C- or pass or consent of the instructor.
  
  • NSCI 361 - Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    This laboratory course will survey theoretical and empirical techniques used in cognitive neuroscience, which is the study of the neural basis of cognition. These techniques complement each other and range from computational modeling of neural circuits, to behavioral psychophysics experiments, to physiological methods for observing brain activity, such as electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Since computation is central to all of these techniques, meetings will take place primarily in the computer lab.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Previous or concurrent enrollment in NSCI 360 and either STAT 113 or 114 or PSYC 200
  
  • NSCI 362 - Clinical Neuroscience

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    The central nervous system is the ultimate example of how an organ’s function is defined by the relationship of local anatomic structures. When neuroanatomy is taught as a subject, the emphasis is on normal anatomy and therefore normal function. It is assumed that disruption of the anatomy results in dysfunction of that system. In the realm of clinical medicine, this process is reversed. It starts with a patient who presents with symptoms then must be evaluated for the nature and location of a disease process. Along the way, imaging such as CAT scans or MRIs may aid in the diagnosis of a neurologic disease. This course will use lectures and patient cases to teach neuroanatomy from a clinical perspective and introduce some common pathology processes in the central nervous system. This course will be taught by neurosurgeon and Oberlin Alum Alan Hoffer.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201
  
  • NSCI 381 - Neurobiology of Disease

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course will examine the cellular and molecular basis of different neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, with an emphasis on understanding incidence, clinical manifestations, pathophysiology, scientific models of causes/mechanisms, medical and diagnostic tools, as well as therapeutic strategies. It will include discussions of the biological and anatomical basis of neurological diseases, as well as recent research approaches into understanding the mechanisms of diseases and developing effective therapeutic approaches. This course is intended to broaden student understanding and creativity of how diseases are diagnosed, examined, and studied. We will discuss clinical neuroanatomy to serve as a basis for understanding brain structures and functional alterations in a variety of developmental, degenerative, neurological, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Disorders of the adult brain, including stroke, seizure disorders, brain tumors, basal ganglia disorders, dementia, mood disorders, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, anxiety disorders, brain/spinal cord injury, substance abuse disorders, and many others will be discussed. Additional diseases covered may vary from year to year. In addition to the assigned readings, students will read and discuss findings from the scientific literature, case-studies, and ethics, as well as develop their scientific writing, presentation, and logical reasoning skills.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201 with a minimum grade of C-, P, or consent of the instructor.
  
  • NSCI 400 - Senior Seminar

    FC NSMA WADV
    4 credits
    Neuroscience seminars are capstone courses for Neuroscience majors designed to help students integrate and apply their knowledge of neuroscience as well as help them consolidate their research, analysis, writing, and presentation skills. These courses will focus on the analysis and discussion of the original research literature in a selected area of neuroscience.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Neuroscience major and senior status or consent of the instructor.
  
  • NSCI 607F - Research - Full

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Students may work on a research problem with an individual investigator.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201
  
  • NSCI 607H - Research - Half

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Students may work on a research problem with an individual investigator.
    Prerequisites & Notes: NSCI 201
 

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