May 20, 2024  
Course Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Course Catalog 2022-2023 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Search


This is a comprehensive listing of all active, credit-bearing courses offered by Oberlin College and Conservatory since Fall 2016. Courses listed this online catalog may not be offered every semester; for up to date information on which courses are offered in a given semester, please see PRESTO. 

For the most part, courses offered by departments are offered within the principal division of the department. Many interdisciplinary departments and programs also offer courses within more than one division.

Individual courses may be counted simultaneously toward more than one General Course Requirement providing they carry the appropriate divisional attributes and/or designations.

 

Neuroscience

  
  • NSCI 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • NSCI 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Opera Theater

  
  • OPTH 202 - Intro to Opera: Performing Techniques

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    A two-semester course in the fundamentals of acting for the singer, emphasizing techniques of body movement through exercise and pantomimes; preparation and performance of opera scenes which stress ensemble work.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: OPTH 202 is prerequisite to OPTH 203. (An equivalent introductory acting course may be substituted for OPTH 202 as a prerequisite to OPTH 203.)Open to singers and to pianists interested in accompanying opera; sophomore status required.
  
  • OPTH 203 - Introduction to Opera: Performing Techniques

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    A two-semester course in the fundamentals of acting for the singer, emphasizing techniques of body movement through exercise and pantomimes; preparation and performance of opera scenes which stress ensemble work. Open to singers and to pianists interested in accompanying opera; sophomore status required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: OPTH 202 is prerequisite to OPTH 203. (An equivalent introductory acting course may be substituted for OPTH 202 as a prerequisite to OPTH 203.)
  
  • OPTH 204 - Opera Aria Coaching

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    In collaboration with studio voice faculty, this course will guide the student singers to find their suitable operatic repertoire and to approach arias with solid learning techniques and practice strategies. In this course, as the singer will learn to engage in in-depth research and analysis of both musical and literary sources, they will be able to explore and express the original dramatic intentions of the creators. Unlike instrumentalists, singers make music almost exclusively in a collaborative capacity and, at the college level, must learn to collaborate on an instrument (a voice) that is still unfinished, growing and changing. Focusing on the practices of singer-pianist collaborations on opera arias, this unique course endeavors to identify and explore the specific skills required of the pianists who have specific interests in piano-vocal collaborative repertoire in the successful rehearsal and performance of the operatic repertoires. As a piano-vocal pair, the students will learn collaborative skills of balance, ensemble, and shared musical leadership, along with rehearsal techniques.
  
  • OPTH 304 - Art of Recitative

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    The purpose of this skill-based course is to provide the student with basic information about recitative styles (secco, accompagnato, Sprechgesang, parlando), evolution of recitative and performance practice of recitatives to serve the text, the drama and stage situations while gearing the characteristics of the performer’s personality and voice.
  
  • OPTH 305 - Opera Workshop

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    A continuation of OPTH 202, 203. Emphasis is placed on eighteenth century period style, acting techniques unique to opera, and recitative; requirements include preparation and performance of opera scenes.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites and Notes Prerequisite: OPTH 203.
  
  • OPTH 306 - Opera Workshop

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    A continuation of OPTH 202, 203. Emphasis is placed on nineteenth- and twentieth-century period styles, acting techniques unique to opera, and spoken dialogue; requirements include preparation and performance of opera scenes.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: OPTH 203.
  
  • OPTH 307 - Avant Garde Performance Practice in Opera and Musical Theater

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    This course will focus on performance styles, their history, evolution and concepts for opera and musical theater from 1900 to 2000. Students will view examples of the styles, read historical documents and perform selections from the styles as a part of their course work.Prerequisites and notes: Part of the ‘Broadway via Berlin: The Political Musical Theater of Kurt Weill’ StudiOC learning community. Admission by audition and/or interview only.
  
  • OPTH 400 - Performance Project

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    Public performance of a major role with the Opera Theater or musical and dramatic preparation of an operatic role, selected by the instructor with the approval of the voice teacher. Consent of instructor required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: May be repeated for credit.
  
  • OPTH 404 - Seminar in Opera

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    A continuation of OPTH 305, 306. Advanced work in role preparation, including individual class presentations of research projects on selected operas, audition techniques, preparation and performance of opera scenes. Emphasis is placed on becoming familiar with operas in the standard repertory and selected contemporary works.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite: OPTH 305, 306.
  
  • OPTH 405 - Seminar in Opera

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    A continuation of OPTH 305, 306. Advanced work in role preparation, including individual class presentations of research projects on selected operas, audition techniques, preparation and performance of opera scenes; acting in a foreign language. Emphasis is placed on becoming familiar with operas in the standard repertory and selected contemporary works.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: OPTH 305, 306.Consent of instructor required.
  
  • OPTH 406 - Seminar in Directing

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    A study of the steps in mounting a production, from title selection through use of scenery, lights, and costumes to performance; discussion of major historical figures in the development of opera stage direction; projects in directing.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Consent of instructor required. Prerequisites: OPTH 305, 306.
  
  • OPTH 407 - Seminar in Directing

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    A study of the steps in mounting a production, from title selection through use of scenery, lights, and costumes to performance; discussion of major historical figures in the development of opera stage direction; projects in directing.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: OPTH 305, 306.Consent of instructor required.
  
  • OPTH 500 - Advanced Seminar in Opera

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Advanced study in role development, performance practice, and professional development, including research and repeated public performances. Off-campus performances may be scheduled.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Consent of instructor required. Prerequisites: OPTH 404, 405. Open only to fifth-year students, special students, and candidates for the Artist Diploma.
  
  • OPTH 501 - Advanced Seminar in Opera

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Advanced study in role development, performance practice, and professional development, including research and repeated public performances. Off-campus performances may be scheduled.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: OPTH 404, 405.Consent of instructor required. Open only to fifth-year students, special students, and candidates for the Artist Diploma.
  
  • OPTH 502 - Research Project in Opera

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    An advanced project of directed research into an opera (its sources, period, libretto, and composer) culminating in a major paper. Includes preparation for the comprehensive examination required of master’s degree candidates.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Consent of instructor required. Prerequisites: OPTH 305, 306. Completion of OPTH 404, 405 recommended. Concurrent enrollment in OPTH 404, 405, subject to approval of instructor. Priority is given to candidates for the master’s degree in Opera Theater.
  
  • OPTH 503 - Research Project in Opera

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    An advanced project of directed research into an opera (its sources, period, libretto, and composer) culminating in a major paper. Includes preparation for the comprehensive examination required of master’s degree candidates.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: OPTH 305, 306.Completion of OPTH 404, 405 recommended. Concurrent enrollment in OPTH 404, 405, subject to approval of instructor.Priority is given to candidates for the master
  
  • OPTH 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Private Reading - Full
  
  • OPTH 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    Private Reading - Half

Pedagogy, Advocacy, and Community Engagement

  
  • PACE 101 - Foundational Music Pedagogy

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    This course is designed to introduce students to best practices for facilitating music teaching and learning in a variety of instructional settings. Topics to be explored include: the role of teachers, developmental markers of learning, strategies for assessing learning, curriculum development and lesson sequencing, establishing practice routines, teaching with technology, strategies for teaching diverse students, and issues of inclusive pedagogy.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Open to College and Conservatory students.
  
  • PACE 101F - Foundational Music Pedagogy

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    This course is designed to introduce students to best practices for facilitating music teaching and learning in a variety of instructional settings. Topics to be explored include: the role of teachers, developmental markers of learning, strategies for assessing learning, curriculum development and lesson sequencing, establishing practice routines, teaching with technology, strategies for teaching diverse students, and issues of inclusive pedagogy. Open to Conservatory and College students.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • PACE 102 - Community Engagement Musicians

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Conservatory students and College Musical Studies majors are invited to enroll in this PACE course, which will examine community engagement at an introductory level. Students will learn about teaching artistry, service learning, and best practices for partnering with a community organization. Professional development topics such as grant writing, non-profit funding, and professionalism with community partners will be covered. Students will examine a range of community engagement models, and are expected to undertake in a co-created project with their community partner. The class will meet twice a week for 75-minutes. Students are expected to spend 3-4 hours per week on readings, reflections, and their semester-long project that they will carry out with their community partner. Students will present the work that they’ve completed at the end of the semester in a final project presentation that will be open to the public.
  
  • PACE 103 - Community Music Engagement in the Schools

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    This course is designed for prospective artist-teachers who will explore community music engagement in the schools. Topics include: (1) specific music-making strategies for teaching in diverse teaching settings with diverse music learners; (2) hands-on music-making experiences outside of traditional ensembles and solo performances; (3) music repertoire and resources for teaching music in a variety of music teaching settings; (4) foundations and current trends of music teaching and learning in global contexts; and (5) strategies for becoming effective communicators and facilitators. Guest speakers (local and via distance learning) will highlight topics explored in class. A community music engagement project will occur in Lorain County Schools. Consent of instructor required.Notes: Previously MUED 504 - Replaced with PACE program.Pre-requisites: For Conservatory undergraduate students, Musical Studies program, and College students interested in music teaching and learning and community engagement in PK-12 settings.
  
  • PACE 104 - String Pedagogy I

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    This one-semester course is intended as an introduction to string pedagogy. The primary focus of the course will be teaching the beginner student. Topics will include the history and philosophy of string pedagogy, and how it influences contemporary teaching. Techniques appropriate to the advancing musician will include a healthy set-up, resources for building technique, and the development of musicianship. This course will be comprised of a mix of classroom lecture and regular observation of Community Music School lessons.Prerequisites: This class is intended for string performance majors.  Musical Studies majors who are interested in teaching will also be considered.
  
  • PACE 105 - String Pedagogy II

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    In this second-level class students will learn in greater detail about string teaching through readings, videos and in-depth discussion of specific techniques and teaching challenges. Topics discussed will include practicing, motivation, vibrato, shifting, “fingerboard geography”, development of the ear, and building musicality. Students will observe Community Music School lessons and will be assigned a student to teach from the community or secondary lesson program. Regular videotaping of lessons will allow for specific guidance and support for the student teacher.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PACE 104 - String Pedagogy I
  
  • PACE 106 - Strings at Grafton Prison

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    This internship is for students interested in providing group music instruction (stringed instruments only) to people who are incarcerated at the Grafton Correctional Institution as a part of the Oberlin Strings at Grafton (OSAG) program. Students will be involved in planning for, teaching, and reflecting on their weekly experiences teaching diverse, adult, learners. This is a community-based learning course in which students will spend at least two hours per week at the prison, in addition to a class meeting on campus. Prison volunteer training is mandatory for this course.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Proficient in a string instrument. Students have the opportunity to take this course no more than twice.
  
  • PACE 107 - Music Advocacy

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    The arts play a critical role in stimulating communities’ creativity, vibrancy, and economic health. This course provides an exploration of arts advocacy, focusing on music, and defining musician-citizens’ roles as advocates. Topics to be experienced include the principles of arts advocacy, public policy priorities inthe field of music, how the music organizations are funded, and how to effectively advocate for music access in various settings.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Open to College and Conservatory students.
  
  • PACE 210 - Piano Pedagogy I/II

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Piano Pedagogy I/II a one-semester introduction to teaching at all levels, in private and group settings. The course covers philosophical and developmental issues as well as a thorough review of methods, materials, resources, and techniques for teaching at the elementary through advanced levels. All students in the course will be assigned one intermediate-level student to teach throughout the semester. Weekly journal reports will be required and video assessments of teaching will be conducted regularly.Pre-requisites: Open to piano majors and minors. Consent of instructor required.
  
  • PACE 212 - Guided Teaching Observation

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    A student will observe a series of individual and group lessons to become familiar with a variety of teaching styles and pedagogical approaches. Requirements will include a portfolio of observation reports and regular consultation with the instructor.Open to piano pedagogy minors or those intending to pursue the minor.
  
  • PACE 220 - Arts Behind Bars

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Students will explore case studies of and research about prison arts programs (i.e., music, drama, literature, visual arts, dance). Students will examine artwork created by those incarcerated and find connections between the art and personal expressions of political, historical, and societal issues, stereotypes, and assumptions relative to incarceration in the U.S. Students participate in prison arts education experiences alongside incarcerated people in Lorain County and/or create community awareness projects about arts and incarceration. Volunteer training at the prisons is mandatory for CBL portions of this course.
  
  • PACE 222 - Building Community Through Music

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    In this course, we will examine art music composed in France during the first thirty years of the Belle oque, from the end of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871 to the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1900. The repertoire will include keyboard and chamber music, orchestra works, modies, and operas by composers such as Bizet, Debussy, Dukas, Duparc, Faur Franck, Massenet, and Saint-Sas. We will discuss a variety of analytical techniques that scholars have applied to this repertoire, including theories of harmony, form, narrative, and gender. We will also consider the question of whether there are aesthetic and stylistic elements that mark this music as characteristically “French.” Written work will consist of responses to readings, analyses of selected works, and a final paper.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Notes: Minimum grade of C- in MUTH 202 and 232.
  
  • PACE 230 - Introduction to Voice Pedagogy

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    An introduction to aspects of the physiology, acoustics, and phonetics of the singing instrument, relating them directly to comparative vocal techniques and to the materials of teaching. It presents basic pedagogic principles and practical application of systematic vocal technique to the teaching of singing.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Significant vocal study. Junior or senior status required.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • PACE 231 - Voice Pedagogy: Supervised Teaching

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    The course will expand upon pedagogic principals for the teaching of singing. Students will gain actual teaching experience under the supervision of the professor for the course, often in consultation with each student’s advisor.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PACE 230 Introduction to Voice Pedagogy.
  
  • PACE 300 - Principles of Education

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    Students will explore the complex world of education from historical, philosophical, sociological and political perspectives and assumptions, while also investigating why different models of schools function as they do. Educational theory, policy, and curriculum will be addressed, specifically current issues and research dealing with students’ readiness to learn, assessment and evaluation, funding, teacher assessment, and educational standards. Traditional and alternative pedagogies, their impact on teaching-learning partnerships, and models for teacher reflective praxis will be included in course readings, discussions, and written reflections. While the course focuses on the American educational system at large, students will practice applying key educational concepts to subject areas of their own interest. Note: Previously Offered as MUED 519 - replaced with PACE 300 course.
  
  • PACE 310 - Elementary Piano Pedagogy Practicum

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    A one-semester course that allows students who have completed Elementary Piano Pedagogy (PACE 210) to further develop their teaching skills. Students will teach one beginning student which will include an assessment and weekly 30-minute lesson. Required portfolios will include observation reports, lesson plans and assessments, and self-critiques of recorded teaching.Pre-requisites: PACE 210. Note: May be repeated once for credit.
  
  • PACE 311 - Intermediate Piano Pedagogy Practicum

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    An opportunity for students who have completed Intermediate Piano Pedagogy (PACE 211) to further develop their teaching skills. Students will teach four pupils weekly as part of the Supervised Teaching Program. Required portfolios will include development of syllabi for individual students, self-critiques of video-taped lessons, written lesson reports, and assessments of student progress.Prerequisite: PACE 211. Note: May be repeated for a total of four credits.
  
  • PACE 312 - Class Piano Pedagogy Practicum

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    An opportunity for students to gain experience in teaching college-level group piano. Students will observe all class sessions of a basic-level piano class, prepare and teach a series of class segments, and become familiar with a variety of teaching methods, materials, and technologies. Required portfolios will include observation reports, text evaluations, lesson plans and assessments, and self-critiques of video-taped teaching.Pre-requisites: PACE 211, PACE 212. Note: May be repeated once for credit.
  
  • PACE 313 - Guided Piano Pedagogy Project

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    An independent study course for prospective and declared piano pedagogy minors. Students must propose and complete a significant written research project in the field of piano pedagogy and present their work in a public lecture-demonstration. Topics may be drawn from the piano teaching literature, current pedagogical trends, or historical pedagogy. Pre-requisites: Open to declared piano pedagogy minors only.
  
  • PACE 314 - Flute Pedagogy I/II

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    Conservatory students will study pedagogy and teach private lessons under close faculty supervision, through working with assigned college students in weekly private lessons and participation alongside faculty in a weekly masterclass for the college students.Prerequisites and notes: Completion of Second Major Flute Committee.
  
  • PACE 316 - Creativity of Music

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Students will explore creativity from psychological, philosophical, and musical perspectives as they relate specifically to music listening, composing, improvising, and performing. Students will explore models of creativity and musical creativity; criteria for identifying musical creativity in humans, and pedagogical strategies for teaching music students who are identified as being musically gifted; policies and laws regarding (musically) gifted students; and means for assessing creative processes and products. Students will engage in composition, improvisation, performance, and listening and reflect upon their own creativity in light of theoretical constructs of creativity stemming from research literature. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: Open to College & Conservatory students. Consent of instructor required.
  
  • PACE 317 - Psychology of Musical Behaviors

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    In this course, students will explore the physical, social, emotional, musical, and cognitive development of music learners neonatal through adulthood. Topics for discussion will include: accommodating instruction for exceptional learners; music perception and cognition; (music) psychology and learning theories and their applications to teaching and learning; developmental characteristics of music learners; music and the brain; multiple intelligences; creativity; musical skill acquisition; and methods of assessing achievement, aptitude, and ability.Pre-requisites: This is a required course for students in the music pedagogy minor. For undergraduate students in the Conservatory, the BA Musical Studies program, and/or any College students interested in exploring developmental issues (psychological/cognitive, social, musical, and affective) related to engaging “students”, neo-natal through older adulthood, with music.
  
  • PACE 318 - Community Building Through Creative Placemaking

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    For this class, and in conjunction with the Creative Placemaking class taught by Eric Steggall, we hope to underscore the specific relationship of art and business by focusing on community engagement, geographical location in time and moment, demographics, the market, and art as an economic and civic driver for a community. By studying and practicing Creative Placemaking the student will learn real-life examples of how arts businesses grow and impact a community and will allow the student to put theory into practice. This course is part of the Creative Placemaking StudiOC learning community. Prerequisites and notes: This course is required for Creative Placemaking StudiOC learning community. Second to Fifth year students from both College and Conservatory. By Consent of Instructor.
  
  • PACE 318OC - Community Building Through Creative Placemaking

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    For this class, and in conjunction with the Creative Placemaking class taught by Eric Steggall, we hope to underscore the specific relationship of art and business by focusing on community engagement, geographical location in time and moment, demographics, the market, and art as an economic and civic driver for a community. By studying and practicing Creative Placemaking the student will learn real-life examples of how arts businesses grow and impact a community and will allow the student to put theory into practice. This course is part of the Creative Placemaking StudiOC learning community.Prerequisites and notes: This course is required for Creative Placemaking StudiOC learning community. Second to Fifth year students from both College and Conservatory. By Consent of Instructor.
  
  • PACE 319 - Diversity in Piano Literature

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    Diversity in Piano Literature will explore works by composers of diverse cultures, ethnicities, genders, and sexual orientations. Piano pedagogy, from the earliest materials to the most advanced, is traditionally dominated by Western male composers, and without appropriate research and education, music by diverse composers will continue to be underrepresented in our literature. In this course, students will discuss, research, and analyze music by composers from diverse backgrounds, develop curriculum free from stereotypes and cultural appropriation, and build a leveling system for replacing traditional repertoire with music by underrepresented composers.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For piano majors.
  
  • PACE 752 - Gamelan as Community Engagement

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    In this course, students will assist in the teaching of a community-engaged gamelan group for under-served youth in the Oberlin area. In the first module, we will briefly learn about best practices of community engagement and the emerging field of ‘community music” before turning our attention to pedagogy and designing lesson plans for the second module. In the second module we will work with the participants in an ongoing gamelan group for six weeks. There will also be opportunities for offering ad-hoc workshops.Pre-requisites: APST 748 previously or concurrently.
  
  • PACE 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Private Reading - Full
  
  • PACE 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    Private Reading - Half

Philosophy

  
  • PHIL 121 - Philosophy & Morality

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course introduces the discipline and practice of philosophy within the context of ethical inquiry. We begin by considering where morality comes from. Issues include the connection between morality and God and whether morality is relative. We then ask what makes a life go well. Is the good life just a matter of being happy, or is there more to it? Next we move to theories of morality, which aim to tell us which actions are right and wrong. We end by considering some particular ethical disputes. Possible topics include abortion, euthanasia, affirmative action, and the treatment of animals.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • PHIL 122 - The Nature of Value

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course deals with central questions in ethics, aesthetics, and political philosophy, the three branches of value theory. These questions include, What makes an action right or wrong? What makes a state just? and, What makes a work of art or landscape beautiful? In order to answer these questions, we will consult key texts, compare forms of judgment, and critically engage with value problems.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • PHIL 126 - Problems of Philosophy

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    In this introduction to the problems and methods of philosophy, we explore a variety of questions regarding human nature, morality, and rationality. Are humans by nature selfish? What makes an action morally right? What, if anything, makes life meaningful? Is it rational to believe in God?
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • PHIL 127 - Being Together: Philosophies of Society and Sociality

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Social philosophy is the systematic working-out of our curiosities about the nature and existence of social phenomena. In this course we will be interested in causal accounts of how social things and social capacities come about, ontological accounts of the fundamental nature of social reality, and normative accounts of what society ought or ought not to be like. In addition to surveying pertinent recent literature in social philosophy, this course will serve as an introduction to the work of some of the great social theorists, such as Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Marx, and Engels.   
  
  • PHIL 127OC - Being Together: Philosophies of Society and Sociality

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Social philosophy is the systematic working-out of our curiosities about the nature and existence of social phenomena. In this course we will be interested in causal accounts of how social things and social capacities come about, ontological accounts of the fundamental nature of social reality, and normative accounts of what society ought or ought not to be like. In addition to surveying pertinent recent literature in social philosophy, this course will serve as an introduction to the work of some of the great social theorists, such as Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Marx, and Engels. This course is part of a StudiOC Learning Community entitled “On Being Social Beings”.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • PHIL 200 - Deductive Logic

    FC ARHU QFR
    4 credits
    What makes an argument a good or a bad one? We will explore the idea that the answer depends on the underlying structure of the argument, and develop a formal language which allows us to bring out that structure. Students will thus acquire an increased ability to critically evaluate arguments in any sphere. A grasp of the essential elements of symbolic logic is also vital for anyone wishing to grapple seriously with contemporary Anglophone philosophy.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Strongly recommended for students considering graduate work in philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 201 - Reason and Argument

    FC ARHU QFR
    4 credits
    A study of methods for analyzing and evaluating arguments as they appear in various settings, including scientific, philosophical, and legal contexts. The course will include an introduction to the study of formal logic, and inductive and probabilistic reasoning.
  
  • PHIL 204 - Ethics

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    In this course we will explore issues that arise in developing a philosophy of morality. Considering approaches by philosophers like Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Mill, and by more recent thinkers like G.E. Moore, Charles Stevenson, John Rawls, and Peter Railton, we will explore some important ethical theories and examine concepts like subjectivity and objectivity, rationality and self-interest, and the nature of morality. (V)
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 206 - Epistemology

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    In this course we will be addressing questions concerning the nature of knowledge, justification, and reasons for belief. Special topics include skepticism, pragmitism, experimental epistemology, relativism and the role of practical interests in epistemic evaluation.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 208 - Metaphysics

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    A survey of some central issues in metaphysics, such as: Is truth always relative to a conceptual scheme? Are there such things as numbers, and if so, what sorts of things are they? What does it mean to say that something is possible, or is necessarily so? How is it that objects persist over time and through changes? Do objects have their parts necessarily? Readings will be from a variety of sources; requirements will be in the form of papers.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One full course in Philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 209 - Representation and Reality

    FC SSCI


    4 credits
    In this course we explore foundational issues in the scientific study of animal behavior. More specifically, we are concerned with theoretical questions about how animals perceive the world around them. Do animals (including humans) need to represent the world accurately in order to respond to the environment effectively? That is, how important is truth or veridicality for attaining biological success? To what extent (if any) do our senses provide an objective perspective on reality? Do animals with different needs and abilities live in different perceived worlds? This course explores these thorny issues from an interdisciplinary perspective, introducing central topics in perceptual psychology, sensory ecology, and philosophy of cognitive science.

     

  
  • PHIL 210 - Existentialism

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Existential philosophy examines basic ethical issues about individual freedom, having a meaningful life, and relations with other people. This course examines the works of Camus, deBeauvoir, Heidegger, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Sartre on a set of issues that are distinctive of existential philosophers, including absurdity and the meaning of life, authenticity and self-deception, the meaning of love and sex, and the significance of death and being finite. (H)
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 214 - PHITS Philosophy in the Schools Practicum

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    The Philosophy in the Schools (PHITS) practicum gives students a new community-engaged way to develop their philosophical skills and understanding, by teaching philosophy through children’s literature. Students will make 8 weekly visits to Eastwood Elementary School, working in pairs to lead lively philosophical discussions. The rest of the course will be taken up with preparation for and reflection on these visits.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Philosophy or permission of instructor.
    Community Based Learning
  
  • PHIL 215 - Ancient Philosophy

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    An introduction to the central problems of Ancient Greek philosophy, with special emphasis on how Plato and Aristotle respond to Socrates’ paradoxical claims about morality and human nature. Other topics include fate, death and feminism. (H)
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course is principally intended for students who have done previous work in philosophy or classics, but there is no specific prerequisite.
  
  • PHIL 216 - Rationalists and Empiricists

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    An introduction to 17th and 18th century European philosophy. The focus is on the nature of reality and human knowledge (metaphysics and epistemology). We read Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant.
    Prerequisites & Notes: At least one previous Philosophy course.
  
  • PHIL 220 - Philosophy of Language

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    In this course we shall explore central contributions to the philosophy of language by major classic and contemporary philosophers of the 20th century, including Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Quine, Davidson, and Putnam. In addition, we shall examine how some of these influential views on meaning, reference, truth, and the content of belief have been applied to address key issues in metaphyics and epistemology, such as the problem of skepticism and moral realism.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Philosophy. Note: Previous work in formal logic is strongly recommended.
  
  • PHIL 222 - Philosophy of Science

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Our best scientific theories seemingly posit an array of entities which we are unable to detect with the unaided senses, but which nonetheless underlie the world of everyday experiencethings such as genes, electrons, and magnetic fields. Do we have good reason to believe in such entities? And do we arrive at the theories in question by employing a “scientific method” which guarantees truth and objectivity?
    Prerequisites & Notes: At least one previous Philosophy course.
  
  • PHIL 225 - Environmental Ethics

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course examines the disparate moral questions raised by the effects of human activity on the natural environment. Do we have duties to regulate economic activity now to preserve resources for future persons? Do we have moral duties to individual animals living in nature, or to entire species of animals? Is the non-living environment itself the legitimate object of moral concern? The readings include work from philosophers, naturalists, biologists, and economists. (V)
  
  • PHIL 226 - Social, Political, Legal Philosophy

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course has three sections: whether, and on what basis, people have a moral obligation to the state, what a just distribution of resources requires, and applied political topics. This last section includes topics such as poverty in other countries, freedom of speech, gun control, just war theory, and punishment. Readings are classical and contemporary, and include Plato, Locke, Marx and others.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Philosophy. (V)
  
  • PHIL 228 - Philosophy of Mind

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    A survey of foundational issues in cognitive science.
  
  • PHIL 230 - Aesthetics

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to some of the main theories in aesthetics having to do with the nature, function and value of art. We will study these theories in relation to art history and practice with the aim of deepening our understanding of what is a distinctly human activity–the creation and enjoyment of art.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Philosophy. (V)
  
  • PHIL 231 - Philosophy of Music

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    As a unique College-Conservatory collaboration, this course encourages any student who cares about music to reflect on its nature and significance. With a focus on Western art music, the course introduces students to key texts and arguments in musical aesthetics. Topics include the nature of the musical work, the relation between music and the emotions, and ways in which music can be meaningful. Students will be responsible for attending the T-TH lecture and one Friday discussion section. Please register for the section that has a discussion section which will work with your student schedule.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 1 Full Course in philosophy OR 1 200-Level course in music history OR consent of instructors.
    This course is cross-listed with MHST 336


  
  • PHIL 232 - Philosophy of Film

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    Philosophy of Film
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.
  
  • PHIL 234 - Topics in Applied Ethics

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    In this course, we’ll examine ethical issues that bear on your life as a college student. For example, is it morally permissible to use cognitive-enhancing drugs to gain an extra edge on your coursework? If there is a speaker you oppose, should you engage in disruptive protest? Should you support calls for the college to take political positions, or should a college be politically neutral? To what extent, if at all, should colleges implement affirmative action in admissions and hiring? Through your reading, writing, reflecting, and discussing, you’ll become more adept at thinking through these and other issues in the ethics of college life.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Philosophy. This course may count toward the major in Law and Society.
  
  • PHIL 235 - Biomedical Ethics

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This course will examine ethical problems arising in the practice of medicine and biomedical research. Topics will include death and dying, medical paternalism, physician assisted suicide, eugenics, cloning, research ethics, and more. Our readings will be drawn primarily from contemporary philosophers. (V)
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 238 - Ethics and Technology

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    In this course, we will discuss the moral questions at play in individuals’, governments’, and corporations’ use of current and future technology. Topics to be considered may include, but are not limited to, the ethics of data privacy, algorithmic decision-making, artificial intelligence, social media, hacking and computer crime, intellectual property, biotechnology, environmental technology, autonomous and semi-autonomous machines, and the intersection of these topics with race, gender, and disability.  
    Prerequisites & Notes: One full course in Philosophy or consent of the instructor
  
  • PHIL 239 - Philosophy of the Digital Arts

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    The development of new technologies for the digital, computer-based composition, display and reproduction of images and sounds has fundamentally changed many kinds of art practice.  In this course we will examine how the digital revolution in the arts affects our understanding of what counts as art, why art matters and how art engages us.
  
  • PHIL 240 - Feminist Epistemology

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    How do gender (and other identity categories, such as race) influence our thinking about what it is to know something, about who can possess knowledge, and about what it is for a belief to be justified? This course investigates these questions. Time permitting, we will also consider related questions in feminist philosophy of science.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Philosophy
  
  • PHIL 245 - Freedom, Self-Consciousness, and Alienation: Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    In the nineteenth century, philosophers began to think about the sociality of reason, that is, about how philosophy itself is conditioned by the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which philosophical thinking is carried out. Their turn towards social reflection had ramifications for the way that thinkers such as Hegel, Marx, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche understood what it is to be truly free, what it means to know ourselves to be so, and what happens when we are estranged from ourselves and from our surroundings. We will study the works of these and several other authors to better grasp the status of our own self-conscious freedom (or lack thereof).
    Prerequisites & Notes: One previous Philosophy course or consent of the instructor
  
  • PHIL 370 - Seminar: Happiness, Death, and the Meaning of Life

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    An exploration of three topics and the connections between them. What is happiness? Should we aim at it? Is death in itself a bad thing, and if so, why? Would immortality be a good thing? What would it be for life to have a meaning? Does meaning require mortality? How are happiness and meaning related, if at all? And how should recent work in psychology on happiness and meaning inform our philosophical thought about these questions?
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two courses in Philosophy
  
  • PHIL 375 - Realism and Representation in Art

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    In this course, we will examine competing philosophical accounts of pictorial representation and the nature of realism in the visual arts and cinema. With reference to specific works, including many from the AMAM collection, we will consider whether pictorial representation depends on resemblance, whether recorded images are inherently more realistic than hand-made images, and whether realistic art has distinctive aesthetic, moral, and cognitive significance.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two previous courses in Philosophy
  
  • PHIL 390 - Seminar: People and Selves

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    Is there such a thing as the self? If so, what is it? We will explore these and related questions, including questions about the nature of people and their existence over time. We will approach these questions through the lens of analytic philosophy, but there will be a special emphasis on engaging with Buddhist ideas about the nature and existence of the self, and our exploration will also be informed by neuroscience and contemporary empirical psychology.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two full courses in Philosophy
  
  • PHIL 401F - Honors - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Honors - Full
  
  • PHIL 401H - Honors - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Honors - Half
  
  • PHIL 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • PHIL 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Physics

  
  • PHYS 051 - Einstein and Relativity

    HC NSMA QFR
    2 credits
    An examination of the special and general theories of relativity and how these theories have changed our conception of space and time.
    Prerequisites & Notes: P/NP grading
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • PHYS 052 - The Strange World of Quantum Mechanics

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    The behavior of atoms and electrons is governed by rules that seem bizarre to our eyes because our opinion of what is usual and what is strange is based on only macroscopic experience. This course investigates these strange conceptual underpinnings of quantum mechanics.
    Prerequisites & Notes: P/NP grading
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • PHYS 054 - Musical Acoustics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    The basic principles of physics (mechanics, wave motion, and sound) that influence the design and performance characteristics of musical instruments will be studied. The major groups of modern orchestral and keyboard instruments will be discussed, and the physics of hearing, singing, harmony, tuning temperaments, and room acoustics will be included. Group projects will be required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Only elementary mathematics is used; review and assistance will be given to those who need it.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • PHYS 068 - Energy Science and Technology

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of issues associated with the generation and consumption of energy in modern society. Topics to be covered include the sun’s energy, electric energy production, distribution, and storage, the hydrogen economy, and energy use in transportation, buildings and industry. Technologies discussed include photovoltaic and wind energy, nuclear power, heat pumps, fuel cells, and hybrid cars.
  
  • PHYS 103 - Elementary Physics I

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    An introduction to classical mechanics, fluids, waves, and optics, intended primarily for students majoring in the life or earth sciences, but also accessible to non-science majors having good high-school mathematics preparation; those planning to major in physics should take PHYS 110 instead. Algebra and trigonometry are used extensively.
    Prerequisites & Notes: The laboratory is an integral part of this course and may not be taken alone. Notes: Students must register for both the lecture and one laboratory section.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • PHYS 104 - Elementary Physics II

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    An introduction to electricity and magnetism and modern physics, including applications to geology, biology, and medicine. Intended primarily for students in the life and earth sciences; those planning to major in physics should take PHYS 111 instead. The laboratory is an integral part of this course and may not be taken alone.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 103 or consent of instructor. Notes: Students must register for both the lecture and one laboratory section.
  
  • PHYS 110 - Mechanics and Relativity

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    A study of Newtonian mechanics and special relativity, focusing on conceptual understanding, problem solving and laboratory work. Topics include point-particle dynamics, conservation principles, oscillation, systems of particles, rotation; time dilation, length contraction, and the relativity of simultaneity. This is the first course in a three-semester calculus-based introductory sequence.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MATH 133. Notes: Concurrent or prior enrollment in MATH 134 is highly recommended as it is a prerequisite for PHYS 111. Students must register for both the lecture and one workshop section.
  
  • PHYS 111 - Electricity, Magnetism and Thermodynamics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This is the second course in the three-semester calculus-based introductory sequence. Topics include electric and magnetic fields, electric and magnetic properties of matter, direct and alternating current circuits, electromagnetic phenomena, thermodynamics and kinetic theory.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 110 (or PHYS 910LE) and MATH 134. Notes: Concurrent or prior enrollment in MATH 231 is highly recommended as it is a prerequisite for PHYS 212. Students must register for both the lecture and one laboratory section.
  
  • PHYS 212 - Modern Physics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This is the last course in the three-semester calculus-based introductory physics sequence. The course covers waves and topics in modern (20th century) physics. Topics include relativistic dynamics, quantum properties of light, wave properties of matter, elementary wave mechanics, nuclear and particle physics, and statistical physics.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 111 and MATH 231. Notes: Concurrent or prior enrollment in MATH 234 is highly recommended for students intending to major in physics. Students must register for both the lecture and one laboratory section.
  
  • PHYS 242 - Electronics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course provides a basic introduction to analog and digital electronic circuits. Students will be asked to design, construct, and analyze electric circuits both using computer simulation software and with actual circuit components. Students will be required to attend three-hour afternoon lab periods, twice weekly.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 104 and PHYS 111, or consent of instructor.
  
  • PHYS 290 - Computational Modeling

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    There are many problems in the natural sciences that cannot be solved using pen and paper. This course will introduce the methods that a computational scientist uses to understand the world around us. Topics may include various techniques, e.g. solving ODEs, Monte Carlo simulations, and genetic algorithms, as well as applications, e.g. orbital dynamics, chemical kinetics, molecular dynamics, chaos and other examples from the natural sciences.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 111 or instructor consent
  
  • PHYS 310 - Classical Mechanics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    A more in-depth study of Newtonian mechanics of particles and systems. Topics include Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations, oscillator systems, central force motion, rigid body motion, and noninertial reference frames. We will also make use of computational methods to solve for equations of motion.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 212 and MATH 234
  
  • PHYS 311 - Electricity and Magnetism

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    An in-depth study of electric and magnetic fields and their effects on matter. Vector calculus will be used extensively after briefly reviewing it. We will learn to solve a variety of boundary value problems using techniques useful in many areas of physics. We will explore Maxwell’s equations in detail, culminating in an introduction to electromagnetic radiation. Practical topics will be interspersed throughout the course.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 310 and MATH 234
  
  • PHYS 312 - Quantum Mechanics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    A rigorous study of the foundations of quantum mechanics, with applications to one-dimensional systems, angular momentum, and the hydrogen atom. Stationary-state perturbation theory. Mathematical solutions to the Schrodinger equation will be developed.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 212 and PHYS 310 and MATH 234
  
  • PHYS 316 - Waves and Optics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    A study of optical radiation. Course will cover geometrical, wave, and nonlinear optics. Topics include physical optics, the wave equation, interference effects, pulse propagation, lasers, and selected topics from modern optics.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 310 and MATH 234
  
  • PHYS 321 - Introduction to General Relativity

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Einstein’s theory of gravitation, general relativity, lies increasingly at the forefront of modern theoretical and observational physics. This course will serve as an introduction to the physics of curved spacetime, with topics including black holes, gravitational waves, and the large-scale structure of the universe. We will also introduce and apply the mathematical tools of differential geometry, which constitute the language of general relativity and much of modern theoretical physics.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Physics 310 or permission of the instructor.
 

Page: 1 <- Back 1015 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 -> 27