Feb 24, 2024  
Course Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Course Catalog 2022-2023 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Search


This is a comprehensive listing of all active, credit-bearing courses offered by Oberlin College and Conservatory since Fall 2016. Courses listed this online catalog may not be offered every semester; for up to date information on which courses are offered in a given semester, please see PRESTO. 

For the most part, courses offered by departments are offered within the principal division of the department. Many interdisciplinary departments and programs also offer courses within more than one division.

Individual courses may be counted simultaneously toward more than one General Course Requirement providing they carry the appropriate divisional attributes and/or designations.

 

Art History

  
  • ARTH 273 - Art and Empire in Africa, 1000-1700

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course will explore arts associated with the rise of African empires prior to the intensification of the trans-Atlantic slave trade in the eighteenth century, with case studies focusing on Mali, Ethiopia, the Swahili Coast, Zimbabwe, Kongo, and Benin. Analyzing a broad range of visual culture - including architecture, statuary, prestige and trade goods, and ritual objects - as well as surviving primary sources, students will consider how visual culture exposes and reifies issues of class hierarchy, religious conversion, and political power in indigenous African contexts. Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 100-level course in art history or Africana Studies
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ARTH 282 - Black Feminist Art: Contemporary Feminist Practices from Africa and its Diasporas

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The recent onslaughts of reproductive rights, and the rights of trans and gender non-conforming people, have irrevocably crushed our illusions of a taken-for-granted sovereignty over our own bodies. In this class, we will examine contemporary art practices from Africa and the African diaspora that explore a radical feminist self-possession, which cannot be reduced to claims of ownership, domination, and control. Interrogating how Black feminist artists have responded to the refused recognition of institutions as museum and art galleries, we will trace the ever-expanding significance of immaterial, performative, and ephemeral artworks through the twenty first century. Field trips required. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: A course in Art History, GSFS, or Africana Studies at Oberlin is recommended.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ARTH 283 - Gender and Power in the Arts of Africa

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Does the gender binary (policed as if it were a biological bedrock) hold globally? This course explores how dynamic African imageries of power disrupt binary distinctions between feminine and masculine. In the arts and visual cultures of Africa and its diasporas, the feminine is often core to the expression and performance of political power. Beginning in the sixteenth century, we will examine a wide range of case studies (including the Oyo, Benin, and Luba empires) and how they inform contemporary art practices across the Atlantic.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: 100-level course in art history recommended but not required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ARTH 290 - Gender and the Visual Arts in Europe and Colonial Latin America, 1450-1650

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course examines understandings of gender in early modern Europe and Latin America through the lens of art and material culture. We will consider not only how cultural conventions of gender limited experiences, but also how marginalized voices challenged conventions. We will explore how gender affected the artistic production of women artists such as Artemisia Gentileschi and Sofonisba Anguissola. And we will consider how women commissioned and collected works of art to construct an identity. We will also discuss how attitudes towards masculinity were shaped through the visual arts and bodily adornment. Field trip required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: A 100-Level Art History course or a GSFS course is recommended but not required.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 340


  
  • ARTH 291 - Baroque Art

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course will examine major developments in European art of the Baroque, from c. 1590-1700, a period of explosive creativity in the visual arts. Topics will include: art in response to the Counter-Reformation; the court artist; Baroque women artists; the painter-philosopher; the lure of antiquity; and meaning in Dutch genre painting. We will consider artists such as Caravaggio, Artemisia Gentileschi, Vermeer, Rubens, Rembrandt, and Velasquez. Field Trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: An Art History 100 or 150 course is recommended but not mandatory.
  
  • ARTH 292 - Art of the Italian Renaissance

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This class will explore a range of alternative approaches to Italian Renaissance art and examine works by some of the most famous artists of the Western tradition, including Giotto, Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo and Titian. Topics to be explored include: the significance of naturalism; the revival of antiquity; the rise of the cultivated patron; miraculous images and civic life; art and politics; portraiture and gender.
  
  • ARTH 293 - Art, Politics, Religion in 16th Century Italy

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course will focus on painting, sculpture, and architecture produced in Italy during the sixteenth century. While taking account of the contribution of individuals such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael and Titian, and the woman artist Sofonisba Anguissola, we will also consider the art of this period within the broader context of political, social, and scientific developments. We will conclude with an examination of the art of the next generation, the style known today as Mannerism.
  
  • ARTH 294 - The Arts of Conquest and Resistance in 17th century Europe and Latin America

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    Much art and architecture produced in Europe and Latin America was closely intertwined in the seventeenth century, from Mexico City to Naples, Cuzco to Antwerp, Quito to Madrid. We will investigate how European powers used visual strategies to exercise political domination across the world, and how locals resisted these efforts by refashioning art and architecture designed to control them. This course examines a wide range of artistic production, from images made of shimmering feathers to processional sculptures to urban design to ephemeral art for civic performances. Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: A 100-level course in art history recommended but not required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is cross-listed with HISP 294


  
  • ARTH 295 - Ingenious Making in the Early Modern World

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course will explore what it meant to make things and work with materials, including featherwork, imitation gems, color making, and metal casting, in Europe and colonial Latin America between around 1350 and 1650. We will follow historical descriptions and recipes to reconstruct methods of making, and learn from expert practitioners, including indigenous makers. We will consider how a wide range of practitioners developed hands-on knowledge in workshops, laboratories, marketplaces, gardens, etc. and we will explore how making was and is a form of knowledge, how there are different systems of knowledge, and the intersections between art making and science. Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 100-level course in art history recommended but not required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • ARTH 295OC - Ingenious Making in the Early Modern World

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course will explore what it meant to make things and work with materials, including featherwork, imitation gems, color making, and metal casting, in Europe and colonial Latin America between around 1350 and 1650. We will follow historical descriptions and recipes to reconstruct methods of making, and learn from expert practitioners, including indigenous makers. We will consider how a wide range of practitioners developed hands-on knowledge in workshops, laboratories, marketplaces, gardens, etc. and we will explore how making was and is a form of knowledge, how there are different systems of knowledge, and the intersections between art making and science. Field trips required. This is a StudiOC course. Students should register for the partner course (TECH 345OC - Mixed Media Circuits: Design, Fabrication, Inquiry) as well as this one.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 100-level course in art history recommended but not required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • ARTH 299 - Methods of Art History

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This course examines the historical development and current practice and theory of art history. Based on close reading of key texts, we consider such topics as: iconography/iconology, semiotics, formalism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, feminism, hybridity, Critical Race Studies and Disability Studies. The course is primarily intended for art history majors who should take it in their sophomore or junior year.
    Prerequisites & Notes: A 100-Level art history course
  
  • ARTH 310 - Word and Image in Medieval Art

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    The relationship of word and image is central to art history, which paradoxically uses words to address images. Medieval art provides a useful arena in which to scrutinize this relationship, as the church equated word and image by defining pictures as the “Bible for the illiterate.”  What does this imply? Can it be true? What are the art historical consequences if images can not be reduced to words? Topics considered include narrative, icons, and ekphrasis.
  
  • ARTH 311 - Art History without a License

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Art history is a modern discipline that did not exist in the ancient or medieval West. Despite the discipline’s absence, ancient and medieval people were passionate about old objects and buildings, asking questions we recognize as art historical: Who made that? How? What does it mean? We will study why people asked these questions and how they answered them. Our coverage will range from c. 0 to 1500, include major sites in Europe and the Mediterranean (i.e. Rome and Jerusalem), and consider Jewish, Christian and Muslim audiences. Careful and creative attention to primary sources will be emphasized. Field trip required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ARTS 299 or instructor consent
  
  • ARTH 312 - Art at the Valois Courts

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    As a new dynasty, the Valois turned to art and architecture to legitimate their rule, and their patronage drove artistic production in late medieval France. This class will study such important patrons as King Charles V and his brothers the Dukes of Berry, Burgundy and Anjou, together with the famous artists they employed, including the Limbourg Brothers, Jean Bondol, and Claus Sluter. Monuments in Paris, Dijon, Bourges and Angers will be studied.
  
  • ARTH 313 - Illuminated Manuscripts in Oberlin Collections

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This class will begin to catalogue Oberlin’s significant collection of medieval and Renaissance miniatures. After learning fundamental skills in researching and describing manuscripts, students will be assigned one or more works to research. As most of the works are fragments from larger wholes, we will be particularly concerned with finding related material. Consent of instructor required.
  
  • ARTH 315 - Medieval Treasuries

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Treasuries were the main venue for collecting objects during the Middle Ages. Established by churches or individuals, treasuries could hold relics, reliquaries, antiquities, gems, metalwork, books, and natural rarities. Incorporating objects old and new, near and far, they were a meeting ground for diverse materials, like the crystal vase that traveled from Cairo through Muslim Spain to Paris. Treasuries thus offer fertile ground for studying how people made, adapted, understood, and (sometimes) destroyed objects. Embracing Europe and the Mediterranean, we will consider Christian, Jewish and Muslim treasuries, and study the Cleveland Museum of Art’s collection.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: An intermediate 200-level (formerly 300-level) course in ARTH or consent of the instructor.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ARTH 326 - Death and Dying in East Asian Art

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    The concept of death and one’s post-mortem fate has traditionally elicited an array of human responses, often an amalgam of fear and fascination. This seminar considers art and practices inspired by these concerns: preparations for graves, ritual treatment/transformation of the body, representations of otherworldly realms, and modern modes of commemoration. We consider themes of the soul, Buddhist judgment and rebirth, ritual sacrifice, and suicide to understand how preparations for or representations of death assuage fears of death.
  
  • ARTH 327 - Image/Object: Material and Mediation in Chinese Art

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    This seminar explores Chinese art from three perspectives: material, technology, and circulation. Following a rough chronology, we will look at material properties (e.g. bronze, clay) and consider how artisans and artists exploited a medium’s inherent character and technological potential to achieve a desired appearance, and how material choices conveyed attitudes towards the dead or to the past. We will also consider attitudes towards antiquities and the circulation of objects as commodities.
    Prerequisites & Notes: A 200-Level Art History class or consent of the instructor.
  
  • ARTH 328 - New Ghosts Old Dreams: The Art of Post-Imperial China

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    During the 20th century, China struggled frequently with internal and external forces in its attempt to reconcile its political authority and its position in the post-imperial world. This seminar considers the various phases in which China refashioned its artistic identity in light of compelling social forces. Underlying themes include the lingering burden of traditional China and the dilemma of Westernization. Both official trends and unofficial counter-currents will be explored as responses to the confrontation of the West. Consent of instructor required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: At least one 200-Level Art History course
  
  • ARTH 329 - Cultural Property? Art, Heritage, Ownership

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    This course considers the issues and stakes that underlie antiquities and their export to disparate contexts to explore the larger question: who owns the past? We will examine positions on ‘cultural property’ from the perspective of archaeologists, art historians, collectors and museums, and explore issues of nationalism and national heritage, (illicit) trade and forgery, the preservation of world monuments, and recent legal cases. Students will research case studies and argue positions in the debate.
    Prerequisites & Notes: An intermediate-level (200-level, formerly 300-level) course in ARTH or consent of the instructor.
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 329


  
  • ARTH 329OC - Cultural Property? Art, Heritage, Ownership

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    This course considers the issues and stakes that underlie antiquities and their export to disparate contexts to explore the larger question: who owns the past? We will examine positions on ‘cultural property’ from the perspective of archaeologists, art historians, collectors and museums, and explore issues of nationalism and national heritage, (illicit) trade and forgery, the preservation of world monuments, and recent legal cases. Students will research case studies and argue positions in the debate. This course is part of the MINING the MUSEUM StudiOC Learning Community.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: An intermediate-level course (ARTH 200-level, formerly ARTS 300-level) or consent of the instructor.
  
  • ARTH 339 - Art, Wit, and Might in Islamic Courts

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    How do artists, patrons, and audiences negotiate power and aesthetic pleasure? This course examines the art produced for courtly elites between 1300-1800. In recent years, scholars have increasingly relied on the term “Persianate culture” to describe a set of literary texts, bodily practices, and codes of conduct shared in courts across the Islamic world. Our focus will be this shared courtly culture, supplemented with comparative cases of diverse origins, from Yuan China to Renaissance Italy. We will study architecture, luxury objects, poetry, and illustrated manuscripts to understand how courtiers fashioned identities, and how the arts shaped courtly societies. We will address issues of race, gender, religious difference, and artistic identity. Readings include primary sources and influential secondary texts from art history, literature, and social sciences.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: An intermediate 200-level (formerly 300-level) course in ARTH or consent of the instructor.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ARTH 352 - The Pleasures of Disgust in Contemporary Art

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Disgust is a powerful tool used to repel, push away, and create distance from objects, actions, and living things deemed undesirable. This seminar explores the wide range of ways artists since the 1960s have harnessed the possibilities of disgust in art. Students will conduct close readings of theories of disgust and related concepts such as abjection and desire, questioning who and what receives these labels. We will analyze a range of contemporary art practice to consider both how art can transform what is disgusting, and how the label of disgusting is used to dismiss artists or art forms. Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: An intermediate-level (200-level, formerly 300-level) course in art history recommended or consent of the instructor.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ARTH 353 - The Special Case of Puerto Rico

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    In 1988, Puerto Rican Art Historian Marimar Benítez identified the ways Puerto Rican artists, both on the island and in the diaspora, use their art to draw out unresolved cultural and political tensions between Puerto Rico and the United States. Building off Benítez, this seminar explores the ways that artists throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have employed aesthetics to intervene in Puerto Rico’s ongoing colonial status. Through artistic practices such as performance, photography, printmaking, installation, painting, and sculpture we will explore themes such as migration, movement, political interventions, nationalism, diasporic identities, racial formation, labor, debt, and popular culture.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: An intermediate 200-level (formerly ARTS 300-level) course in ARTH or consent of the instructor.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ARTH 370 - Slavery and the Problem of the Visual

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    What aesthetic strategies can we, or should we, use to try to visualize the history of trans-Atlantic slavery? Through a series of case studies spanning the Atlantic world, we will tackle the visual culture of slavery through lenses of trauma, witnessing, memory, racial and gendered subjectivity, and cross-cultural conceptions of enslavement. Specific topics will include the role of public memorials, the paradox of ‘slave portraiture,’ and anti-aesthetic efforts to ‘flee’ visual representation altogether.
    Prerequisites & Notes: An intermediate-level (200-level, formerly 300-level) course in art history recommended or consent of the instructor
  
  • ARTH 371 - African Art in Museums: From Collection to Display

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    How should we display African objects in museums? Students in this seminar will answer this question by helping to design a semi-permanent installation of African art at the Allen Memorial Art Museum. Connecting theory with practice, we will read about the histories of looting, collecting, and display; meet with museum professionals; debate labeling and research strategies; and visit installations of African art in Cleveland and elsewhere. Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: A 100-Level course in art history or Africana studies
  
  • ARTH 382 - The Feminine as Method for Art Histories of the Black Atlantic

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    In this seminar we will focus on the feminine as a strategic position for artists and critics from which to read against the narratives that have historically legitimized the devaluation of Black lives, philosophies, and aesthetics across the Atlantic. Instead of the representation of women or a biological binary, we will approach the feminine as a subjective position tracing how external markers of difference permeate and transform us. Through in-depth analysis of contemporary artworks and Black Feminist scholarship, we examine the possibilities of conceiving the feminine as a method to repair the intimate fractures of racial, gender, and colonial violence. Field trips required. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: A course in Art History, Africana Studies, or GSFS is required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ARTH 390 - Wood, Flesh, Metal, Blood

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    The early modern period in Europe saw an explosion in the production of “stuff”. This seminar explores the significance of materials at this time, when, for instance, wood was compared to the human body and metals to blood. Working with materials in workshops, laboratories and marketplaces, artisans developed hands-on experience that paved the way for much of the “higher learning” of the Scientific Revolution. Cross-cultural exchange of, and appreciation for, materials will also be considered.
    Prerequisites & Notes: A 200-level course in Art History is required.
  
  • ARTH 391 - Love, Lust, and Desire in Renaissance Art

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    During the Renaissance new technologies and scientific advances brought about new understandings of desire and sexuality, which had results in the representational arts. At the same time, many values associated with love and sexuality marked a continuum with the preceding period, including ideas about marriage. We will explore how early modern Europeans of different social status thought about love, lust, and desire in a range of different areas (social, political, religious, “medical”, “scientific”, etc.) and how attitudes in these areas affected artistic production and representation, and related to lived experiences. Prerequisites & Notes: An intermediate-level (200-level, formerly 300-level) course in art history recommended or consent of the instructor. Field trip required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: An intermediate-level (200-level, formerly 300-level) course in art history recommended or consent of the instructor
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ARTH 499 - Honors in Art History

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    For Honors candidates only under the supervision of one or more members of the staff.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Consent of instructor and of the chair for Art History required. Course does not count toward the major; see front matter.
  
  • ARTH 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • ARTH 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Astronomy

  
  • ASTR 100 - Introductory Astronomy

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course, designed primarily for students with little scientific background, is an introduction to what we know about astronomy and how we know it. We will study the light, the tools of astronomy, stars, galaxies and cosmology. We will also cover sky basics such as seasons, moon phases, eclipses, and constellations. There will be required participation in six planetarium sessions (half an hour every other week) and four required observatory sessions during the semester.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • ASTR 201 - Introduction to Astrophysics: How to build the elements

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Out of the entire periodic table, only hydrogen, helium, and a tiny bit of lithium have been present for the entire history of the Universe. All the other, more complex, elements, including the ones required for life, were created through astrophysical processes over the course of cosmic time. We will cover what processes created these elements, why the elemental content of distant objects in space is a useful thing to know, and what we have learned from studying it in different astrophysical objects. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 103, 110 or consent of the instructor
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ASTR 301 - Astrophysics I: Stars and Planets

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Astrophysics is physical analysis applied to astronomical problems. We will develop some of the basic tools of astrophysics in this course. Radiation theory including thermal and non-thermal radiation will be studied as well as the transfer of radiation through typical astrophysical media. Other topics will include star formation, degenerate matter, atomic physics in an interstellar setting, and the detection of electromagnetic radiation over a broad range of wavelength regimes.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 212
  
  • ASTR 302 - Astrophysics II: Galaxies and Cosmology

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course will explore basic astrophysical topics beyond the local stellar neighborhood. We will consider the ‘ecology’ of the Milky Way galaxy and use it to understand galaxies in isolation and in clusters. Cosmological topics will include the dynamics of an expanding universe including an acceleration term. Results from anisotropy studies of the cosmic background radiation will be studied in some detail. Evidence for dark matter and dark energy will be thoroughly reviewed.
    Prerequisites & Notes: PHYS 212

Athletics and Physical Education

  
  • ATHL 102 - Cardio Machine Circuit

    CC
    0.5 credits
    This course will introduce you to all of the cardio machines housed in the Shanks Fitness Center. You will learn how to safely use each machine and go through introductory-intermediate workouts. Upon completing this course, you will have the confidence and knowledge to use any cardio machine in Shanks for health and fitness purposes.
  
  • ATHL 102A - Cardio Machine Circuit

    CC
    0.5 credits
    This course will introduce you to all of the cardio machines housed in the Shanks Fitness Center. You will learn how to safely use each machine and go through introductory-intermediate workouts. Upon completing this course, you will have the confidence and knowledge to use any cardio machine in Shanks for health and fitness purposes.
  
  • ATHL 105 - Vinyasa Yoga

    CC
    0.5 credits
    Vinyasa Yoga is a form of yoga incorporating a series of postures connected by flowing movement and rhythmic breathing practice. Vinyasa means “to set with intention,” so this class offers the opportunity to set yourself with intention on the mat. The opportunity to take time for Self, and connect to your strength, soulfulness and authenticity. Starting with a brief meditation, the postures will be then be offered up layer by layer (with modifications offered for various levels of flexibility or strength) leaving you feeling strong and grounded. It is about dropping the ego, challenging yourself and having fun. Yoga is the stilling of the mind, but we start with the body, the most tangible thing in our reach, to help hook our mind to the internal space, connect to the breath, and slow the thoughts.
  
  • ATHL 105B - Vinyasa Yoga

    CC
    0.5 credits
    Vinyasa Yoga is a form of yoga incorporating a series of postures connected by flowing movement and rhythmic breathing practice. Vinyasa means “to set with intention,” so this class offers the opportunity to set yourself with intention on the mat. The opportunity to take time for Self, and connect to your strength, soulfulness and authenticity. Starting with a brief meditation, the postures will be then be offered up layer by layer (with modifications offered for various levels of flexibility or strength) leaving you feeling strong and grounded. It is about dropping the ego, challenging yourself and having fun. Yoga is the stilling of the mind, but we start with the body, the most tangible thing in our reach, to help hook our mind to the internal space, connect to the breath, and slow the thoughts.
  
  • ATHL 110 - Lifeguard Training

    CC
    0.5 credits
    The purpose of the American Red Cross Lifeguarding course is to provide entry-level lifeguard participants with the knowledge and skills to prevent, recognize and respond to aquatic emergencies and to provide care for breathing and cardiac emergencies, injuries and sudden illnesses until emergency medical services (EMS) personnel take over.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 1. Swim 300 yards continuously demonstrating breath control and rhythmic breathing. Candidates may swim using the front crawl
    (freestyle), breastroke or a combination of both, but swimming on the back or side is not allowed. Swim goggles may be used.
    2. Tread water for 2 minutes using only the legs
    3. Complete a timed event within 1 minute, 40 seconds:
    Starting in the water, swim 20 yards. The face may be in or out of the water. Swim goggles are not allowed.
    Surface dive, feet first or head first, to a depth of 7 to 10 feet to retrieve a 10-pound object.
    Return to the surface and swim 20 yards on the back to return to the starting point with both hands holding the object and keeping the face at or near the surface so you are able to get a breath. Candidates should not swim the distance under water. Exit the water without using a ladder or steps.
  
  • ATHL 116 - American Red Cross First Aid and CPR

    CC
    0.5 credits
    Learn lifesaving skills of first aid and CPR w/AED. Fee for textbook and certification (TBA).
  
  • ATHL 119 - Breathe & Flow: Exploring Mindful Movement through Yoga

    CC
    0.5 credits
    Consciously linking movement to breath, this dynamic session will explore diverse practices of yoga leading to balance, strength, flexibility and work to promote a sense of calm. This class is designed for all levels of yoga experience, taught with options for taking it easy or practicing the full expression of poses. Come flow!
  
  • ATHL 119B - Vinyasa Yoga

    CC
    0.5 credits
    A yoga-inspired movement class with an emphasis on breath, Vinyasa will awaken, invigorate, strengthen and stretch the body and calm the mind. Appropriate for students of all levels, this playful class will challenge cardiovascular, core, and mental fitness. Students must supply their own yoga mat for this course.
  
  • ATHL 124 - Women’s Fitness

    CC
    0.5 credits
    This class is an introductory general fitness class for women. Students will be taught a variety of different methods of cardio and strength training in a different setting each week. Principles and benefits of cross training will be addressed through participation in a wide variety of activities in the gym, outside, in the pool and on the climbing wall.
    Prerequisites & Notes: P/NP grading.
  
  • ATHL 126 - Strength Training I

    CC
    0.5 credits
    This class is an introductory resistance training class, emphasizing basic principles of strength training, proper body alignment, and health benefits. Students will learn how to safely exercise using strength training equipment, free weights and core strength training. You will complete 3 total body workouts each week.
    Prerequisites & Notes: P/NP grading.
  
  • ATHL 128 - Coed Indoor Soccer

    CC
    0.5 credits
    This co-ed class is offered for all Oberlin College Students, no matter what their skill level. It is meant as an introductory course, where the emphasis is on playing. Some basic skills will be reviewed, and players can ask for individual help on specific skills. ALL are encouraged to join class.
    Prerequisites & Notes: P/NP grading.
  
  • ATHL 129 - Strength Training II

    CC
    0.5 credits
    This class focuses on advanced concepts of strength training while maintaining safe lifting techniques. Students will use a variety of methods including the use of resistance machines, free weights, and core strength training. Students will develop their own regimen demonstrating their understanding of the different principles of strength training.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One introductory weight training class and adherence to a 6-week strength training program immediately prior to the first class. P/NP grading.
  
  • ATHL 143 - Walking Fitness

    CC
    0.5 credits
    A module length course designed for those needing motivation to get out and walk and learn proper walking form, stretching techniques, injury prevention and a variety of routes on campus and in and around Oberlin. The goal of the course is to improve general fitness.
  
  • ATHL 144 - Bowling I

    CC
    1 credit
    Focuses on development of ability to execute fundamental bowling skills
  
  • ATHL 152 - Racquet Sports

    CC
    0.5 credits
    In this course students will learn the rules, as well as basic technique and strategy for all major racket sports: tennis, badminton, squash, racquetball, and table tennis. Other, less popular, racket sports such as pickle ball will also be explored.
    Prerequisites & Notes: P/NP grading.
  
  • ATHL 152B - Tennis I

    CC
    0.5 credits
    Students will be introduced to the basis strokes (forehand, backhand, serves and volley). Basic positioning, tennis rules and etiquette will be included in singles and doubles play.
  
  • ATHL 159 - Individual Baseball Skills Training

    CC
    0.5 credits
    The class will teach and develop baseball skills including hitting, fielding and pitching. All levels of expertise are welcome.
  
  • ATHL 162 - Circuit Training

    CC
    0.5 credits
    The purpose of this class will be to improve both strength and cardiovascular endurance through a variety of efficient high intensity workouts with minimal rest between sets. Differing activities each class will keep you excited and engaged.
  
  • ATHL 162B - Circuit Training

    CC
    0.5 credits
    The purpose of this class will be to improve both strength and cardiovascular endurance through a variety of efficient high intensity workouts with minimal rest between sets. Differing activities each class will keep you excited and engaged.
  
  • ATHL 170 - Techniques of Relaxation

    CC
    1 credit
    A class focused on introducing and implementing various techniques of relaxation, including breathing, meditation, yoga, music, and movement. Students should wear comfortable clothing that allows them to stretch and move.
  
  • ATHL 175 - Introduction to Performance Nutrition

    CC
    0.5 credits
    If you move, you’re an athlete, and there are certain ways we need to fuel to perform at our absolute best.Whether you play varsity athletics, club sports, recreational sports, love going to the gym, ride the bike, love to run, or are just interested in the topic, this class is for you.The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the appropriate nutrition practices in relation to exercise or sport training to promote health, energy and adaptations. We’ll cover everything from macronutrients, hydration, to supplements, and beyond!
  
  • ATHL 197 - Beginning Swimming

    CC
    0.5 credits
    Swimming instruction for the non-swimmer or true beginner/adv. beginner swimmer. Become accustomed to the water, while developing basic skills (floating, changing positions and directions, breath control), strokes (front crawl, back crawl, elementary backstroke, perhaps breaststroke and sidestroke) and greater comfort levels in the water.
  
  • ATHL 198 - Advanced Swimming Techniques

    CC
    0.5 credits
    This class will teach improved swimming efficiency in the four competitive sstrokes through advanced swimming techniques. Designed to help the casual swimmer become a good swimmer or a good swimmer become a great swimmer. Must be proficient in front and back crawl. Focus will be on technical instruction rather than conditioning.
  
  • ATHL 200 - Leadership Development

    CC
    1 credit
    This course is an introduction to leadership development within the growth of successful businesses, teams, or institutions. We will identify the various types of leadership, the types of conflict they are intended to resolve, and practice the application and analysis of leadership development in various forms. The goal is to provide an introduction to the process of leadership development and give opportunities for you to practice these skills.
  
  • ATHL 202 - Sports Medicine

    CC
    0.5 credits
    This class is designed for students interested in fields such as athletic training, physical therapy, or other sports medicine-related fields. The primary focus will include, but not be limited to, the following topics: the Sports Medicine team, medical terminology, basic orthopedic anatomy, injury prevention, nutritional considerations, mechanisms and characteristics of sports trauma, injury assessment and evaluation, basic taping and bandaging, explanations of therapeutic modalities, and basic exercise rehabilitation. Field trips required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • ATHL 205 - Intermediate Vinyasa Yoga

    CC
    0.5 credits
    This class is for those with a strong yoga or dance background, or those who have previously taken a Vinyasa Yoga class and would like more of a challenge. We will progress to a deeper level working towards more advanced postures and arm balances. This is a strong, yet compassionate Vinyasa flow, warming, opening and strengthening the whole body, whilst calming and centering the mind. Starting with a brief meditation, the postures will be then be offered up layer by layer (with modifications offered for various levels of flexibility or strength) leaving you feeling strong and grounded. It is about dropping the ego, challenging yourself and having fun. By presenting ourselves with things slightly outside our comfort zone, we learn to lean into those challenges with compassion and self-acceptance, breathe, release, let go, smile and find a new and more balanced place within ourselves.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have taken ATHL 105 or 105B.
  
  • ATHL 227 - Couch to 10k

    CC
    1 credit
    This two module, Tuesday/Thursday course will enable all levels of runners to complete a 10k race. All you need to be successful in this course is a goal and the consistent motivation and work ethic to accomplish that goal. Each class member will be given a personal training program to accomplish their individual running goals. Class attendance and all outside class runs are mandatory. Entrance fees for any 10k race will be paid by individual class members.
  
  • ATHL 244 - Bowling II

    CC
    1 credit
    Focuses on development of ability to make advanced bowling adjustments
    Prerequisites & Notes: Bowling I is required.

Biology

  
  • BIOL 003 - Finding Well-being and Ways Forward Through Adversity

    HC NSMA QFR
    2 credits
    Major adversity can bring focus to the question of what truly matters and suggest answers that clarify ways forward through challenges great and small.  The question and answers will be explored in the seminar through lenses of biology, social sciences, and humanities.  The seminar will study (i) biological perspectives on beneficial and deleterious ways our body responds to stress, (ii) social scientific insights on determinants of happiness and well-being, and (iii) lessons on living well from the humanities.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prefererence for students intending non-science majors.
  
  • BIOL 035 - Introduction to Global Health

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    This course provides an overview of global patterns of disease and the factors that influence human health. Students will learn about issues relating to social, cultural, behavioral, and environmental determinants of health. A specific focus will be placed on health issues relating to low income countries and underserved populations.
  
  • BIOL 047 - Biology of Infectious Diseases and their Global Impact

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Infectious diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites have had a very large effect on human societies from ancient history to the current day. This course will provide an overview of the different types of pathogens that cause human disease and their effects on humans. We will investigate specific examples of each type of pathogen to illustrate the commonalities and differences of these disease-causing agents. We will also look at the way that human infectious diseases are treated and prevented, as well as the problematic history of infectious disease research and the long-term effects of diseases on human societies.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • BIOL 060 - Innovation and Design

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    The heart of the course will be a design project in which students collaboratively use the tools of creative problem solving to develop adaptive equipment to meet needs of a community partner that employs adults with cognitive or physical disabilities.  Focused on design thinking, the learning will be centered in a maker space for paper making, marbling, and printing (3D and letterpress).  Through the project, students will additionally practice critique, collaboration, and communication, as well as deepen epistemological understanding of the nature of science and innovation.
  
  • BIOL 086 - Human Genetics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    What exactly are genes? This course provides an introductory overview to the science of genetics, as applied to human health and society. We will explore topics such as the nature of DNA, chromosomes, genomes, inheritance, genetic testing, inherited diseases, gene therapy, genome editing, and the genetics of cancer.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • BIOL 100 - Organismal Biology

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course provides prospective biology majors and others with an integrated introduction to the biology of organisms, from the subcellular level, through the cellular, tissue, organ, and whole organismal level. Students must register for both lecture and laboratory. Sections taught by Laskowski and Allen use inquiry-based learning, with substantive writing and group-based problem solving
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • BIOL 103 - Environmental Biology

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Designed for ENVS majors whose curricular pathways are outside the NSCI division. Students considering a biology major or the full range of upper-level biology courses should take the BIOL core. This course provides a foundation in biological content and concepts in the context of environmental problems, from molecular/cellular levels to ecosystems. Lectures will be augmented with individual and group activities.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Thirty seats are reserved for ENVS majors, with remaining seats for first- and second-year students. Students who have passed BIOL 100 or 200 are not eligible for this course.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • BIOL 200 - Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course provides biology majors and others with an integrated introduction to key biological principles of ecology and evolution, including selection, drift, sources of variation, and patterns of diversity, as well as factors and processes governing biotic and abiotic interactions that influence distribution and abundance of organisms. Labs feature indoor and field exercises and discussions designed to develop critical thinking and quantitative skills in data collection, analysis, and interpretation.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 100
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • BIOL 202 - Plant Ecology

    FC NSMA QFR WADV
    4 credits
    Ecological principles will be used to examine plant population and community processes. Special attention will be given to plant/animal interactions, e.g. pollination, dispersal, and herbivory. Lab will use local habitats to gain hands-on experience in field observations, study design, data collection, analytical methods, plus written and oral presentations of results.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 103 or BIOL 200.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    Sustainability
  
  • BIOL 213 - Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This course integrates biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology to provide a foundation for many of the more specialized courses in the major. Topics include structure and function of membranes and cell organelles; gene structure, function and regulation; bioenergetics; cell cycle control, signal transduction and genetic engineering. Associated laboratory exercises highlight the techniques used in cell and molecular biology research and teach experimental design, troubleshooting and critical analysis. Students must register for both lecture and laboratory. By taking both BIOL 213 and CHEM 254, students are exposed to the material typically covered in an undergraduate, introductory biochemistry course.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 100 and the equivalent of a year of introductory chemistry (CHEM 101 and 102, or CHEM 103, or an AP equivalent). It is not permitted to take CHEM 102 or CHEM 103 simultaneously with BIOL 213. The chemistry requirement must be completed prior to taking BIOL 213.
  
  • BIOL 214 - Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry Lab

    NSMA
    0 credits
    Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate processes central to cell and molecular biology and to familiarize students with basic skills required at the laboratory bench.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Students must complete BIOL 214 to receive a final grade for BIOL 213.
    Graduating seniors enrolled in BIOL 213 during the 2020-21 academic year must also enroll in BIOL 214 in the same academic year. All other students enrolled in BIOL 213 during 2020-21 must take BIOL 214 during the 2021-22 academic year. The transcript grade for BIOL 213 will appear as an asterisk until completion of BIOL 214. Grades for lecture and lab will be combined for a final grade.
  
  • BIOL 235 - Essentials of Epidemiology

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    This course introduces students to the strategies and tools used by public health professionals to identify, investigate, and control important biologic, social, and environmental determinants of disease and health-related states in specific populations.  Lab provides a hands-on approach to applied social science research; students will be introduced to methods of systematically solving research problems.    
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: BIOL 100
  
  • BIOL 303 - Chemical Ecology

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Organisms dispense and receive molecules as a form of invisible and soundless communication. This language is utilized to find homes, mates, and prey; to identify enemies, friends, and family. Chemicals are used to defend, offend, and cooperate. This course will examine how chemical communication mediates relationships between organisms and between organisms and their environment. An affinity for chemistry is not required; rather an appreciation for the chemistry that mediates ecological interactions is something we will work toward as a class.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 200
  
  • BIOL 307 - Microbiology

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    The study of microorganisms with an emphasis on bacteria. Major areas to be covered include microbial cell structure and function, genetics, metabolism, and ecology. Applied aspects of microbiology will also be discussed, including biotechnology, the role of microorganisms in environmental processes, and medical microbiology.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213
  
  • BIOL 310 - Genetics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    The study of heredity has evolved into a discipline whose limits are continually expanded by innovative molecular technologies. This course explores the experimental basis for our current understanding of the structures, functions and inheritance of genes. The applications of molecular genetic approaches to address a variety of Eukaryotic and prokaryotic genetics with illustrative material from viruses, bacteria, plants, and humans is presented. The laboratory part of the course provides an experimental introduction to classical and modern genetic analysis.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213
  
  • BIOL 310L - Genetics Lecture

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    The study of heredity has evolved into a discipline whose limits are continually expanded by innovative molecular technologies. This course explores the experimental basis for our current understanding of the structures, functions and inheritance of genes. The applications of molecular genetic approaches to address a variety of Eukaryotic and prokaryotic genetics with illustrative material from viruses, bacteria, plants, and humans is presented.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213
  
  • BIOL 312 - Physiology

    FC NSMA QFR WADV
    4 credits
    How we and other organisms function forms physiology’s central question, approached in class first by studying how cells communicate and translate messages into action. Focus then shifts to more complex queries (e.g., how does the body respond when in love or under stress), integrating cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and sexual physiology. Goals include strengthening reasoning and habits of mind that underlie deep understanding and lifelong learning.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CHEM 102 or 103; BIOL 213 or NSCI 201
  
  • BIOL 317 - Introduction to Microbiological Techniques

    HC NSMA QFR
    2 credits
    This course will serve as an introduction to techniques common to the field of microbiology. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate processes central to microbiology and to familiarize students with basic skills required for working with microorganisms. Topics will include microscopy, staining, aseptic technique, microbial growth and control of microbial growth, isolation and identification of unknown bacteria, and genetic engineering. Students will have the opportunity to design and carry out several mini-experiments to explore questions of their own choosing.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Pre-requisite: Bio 213
  
  • BIOL 318 - Evolution

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Principles of microevolution (selection, gene flow, mutation, genetic drift, and factors that influence population genetic structure), evolutionary ecology (life history strategies, gene-environment interactions), and macroevolution (changes above the species level) will be studied, with emphasis on both the process and pattern of organic evolution.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 200
  
  • BIOL 321 - Plant Biology

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    This course investigates the wide variety of plant forms and the molecular mechanisms that generate them, and provides a conceptual framework for understanding plant development that includes an evolutionary perspective. The course also includes a required laboratory, in which students will participate in an area of active research. Some out-of-class hours for lab work will be required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213 or consent of instructor.
  
  • BIOL 322 - Genetics of Populations

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    The evolution of phenotypic traits results from the action of selective and non-selective forces on the distribution of genetic variation within and among populations. We will use mathematical and computational models to study adaptation and the genetic architecture of complex traits in the context of natural populations. These evolutionary approaches have critical applications in the study of disease, conservation biology, agriculture, and the response to climate change. Labs may involve field work or be computer-based. Prerequisite & Notes: BIOL 200 or BIOL 202.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite & Notes: BIOL 200 or BIOL 202.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • BIOL 323 - Plant Systematics

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    How did Earth’s biodiversity attain its current form and distribution? Systematists strive to answer this question by reconstructing the history of organismal diversity using diverse lines of evidence, ranging from anatomy to biogeography to genomics. Lectures introduce important principles and concepts in systematics, including taxonomy, phylogenetics, speciation, and character evolution. Labs provide a hands-on introduction to modern molecular systematics techniques and to plant diversity, through a combination of lab activities and field trips.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 200 or BIOL 103. Co-requisite: BIOL 324.
  
  • BIOL 324 - Plant Systematics Laboratory

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Labs provide a hands-on introduction to modern molecular systematics techniques and to plant diversity, through a combination of lab activities and field trips.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 200 or BIOL 103. Co-requisite: BIOL 323.
  
  • BIOL 325 - Marine Eco-physiology

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Eco-physiology or physiological ecology is concerned with the effect of environmental factors, both biotic and abiotic, on the function of living organisms. This course will examine marine biodiversity and ecosystems with a special focus on the cellular and organismal adaptations that allow organisms to exploit marine habitats. Students will gain an appreciation for the diversity of marine lifestyles and the interdependence of ecology with molecular, cell, and organismal biology.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 200 and 213.
  
  • BIOL 330 - Genetic Analysis

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    This course will provide students with an appreciation for, and understanding of, the field of genetics, from its earliest inception to recent advances.  While the tools of genetic analysis have changed dramatically in the last century, the study of genetics is unified by the goal of understanding how genes and genomes function and evolve, how genes inform biological functionality, and how gene-based technology can be harnessed to improve society.  Human genetics is emphasized but a variety of vertebrate, invertebrate, and microbial systems will be included.  Social implications of genetic technologies in medicine and other areas will be discussed. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213
  
  • BIOL 335 - Mycology

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    In search of fungi: in this introductory mycology course, we will focus on fungi in the natural areas around Oberlin, including required field trips. A beginner’s knowledge of R is strongly preferred, because as part of a course-long project, we will mine openly available observational data (from museums, citizen science & similar) to produce expectations of the fungi we could find fruiting during field days. Basics of fungal biology, ecology, taxonomy, and evolution will be covered during the course, with the local-scale field component complemented by an understanding of larger-scale fungal patterns and processes. Course subcomponents will also provide information on non-fruiting and micro-fungi, e.g, molds, pathogens, and parasites. Lecture and lab required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 103 or BIOL 200
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • BIOL 336 - Genomics

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Genome analysis has enriched every field of biological research from ecology and evolution to virology and disease prevention. In this course, we will discuss how genomes are sequenced and analyzed to identify genes and predict the functions and functional relationships of their products. In a computer-based lab, we will do original research involving genome annotation, protein structure and function prediction, and evolutionary analysis of protein families.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213
  
  • BIOL 338 - Immunity and Pathogenesis

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Our immune system protects us against pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, and parasites, and also plays important roles in normal body functions including recognizing and eliminating cancer cells. In this class, we will examine the many functions of the immune system in health and disease, with particular focus on the innate and adaptive components of the mammalian immune system. We will also learn how pathogens subvert immunity, which can result in infectious diseases and how we can use our knowledge of the immune system to treat a variety of diseases. This is a variation of BIOL 337 without the laboratory component.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213
  
  • BIOL 340 - Eukaryotic Cell Culture Laboratory

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This laboratory course will serve as an introduction to techniques used to study eukaryotic cell structure and function. Students will learn a variety of cellular and molecular techniques that are widely used to study cellular growth, division, and function in both fundamental biology and applied biomedical research fields. This course will also provide students with experience in experimental design and analysis. Occasionally, students will be required to work outside the scheduled lab period.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213
    Occasionally, students will be required to work outside the scheduled lab period.
  
  • BIOL 403 - Seminar: The Cell and Molecular Biology of Pathogen-Host Interactions

    FC NSMA QFR WADV
    4 credits
    Bacterial pathogens both manipulate their eukaryotic host cells’ behavior and themselves change in response to contact with the host. We will use readings from the primary literature to examine the molecular mechanisms of these interactions and the methods used to study them. Student presentations will alternate with class discussions. Students will also write papers analyzing research from the primary literature.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213
  
  • BIOL 407 - Seminar: Origin(s) of Life

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    The emergence of life from non-living chemistry remains one of the great unsolved problems in science. In this course, we will survey current research on prebiotic chemistry, early Earth environments, synthetic biology, and evolutionary reconstruction of ancient organisms. We will develop a detailed understanding of what is and is not known about life’s origin as well as an appreciation for what life essentially is and whether it should be common throughout the universe.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213 or CHEM 254
  
  • BIOL 408 - Seminar: Experimental Evolution

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    An evolutionary perspective contributes to our understanding of cancer occurrence and progression, infectious diseases (e.g., HIV), improvement and management of agro-ecosystems, and management of exploited populations (e.g., fisheries). More than simply a historical process, evolution in these contexts can be studied experimentally. Such studies have the potential to aid us in avoiding undesirable outcomes or improve the probability of desirable outcomes. We will explore the scientific literature in experimental evolution, developing a deeper understanding via written assignments and student-led class discussions.
  
  • BIOL 409 - Seminar: Scientific Trailblazers

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Seminar explores contributions of scientists with identities underrepresented in science, with an emphasis on plant biologists. Students will discuss original scientific papers written by these authors, aiming to understand the underlying biology. Because teaching is the best way to learn, students will go on to collaboratively design an inclusive classroom activity addressing a misconception or core concept in biology, formulate a strategy to test the activity’s effectiveness, and implement the activity in Bio 100.  Students will then communicate their findings. It is hoped that the activity developed in this course will be useful in BIOL 100 in future years.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Pre- or co-requisite: BIOL 213.
  
  • BIOL 410 - Seminar: Viral Diseases

    HC NSMA


    2 credits
    Viruses depend on living host cells and organisms belonging to every kingdom of life (Monera, Protista, Fungi, Plantae, Animalia).  How do these infectious particles harm their hosts?  How are they able to mutate rapidly?  Are they living or non-living?  These and related topics will be the subject of this seminar.

     
    Prerequisites & Notes: Pre-requisites:  BIOL 100, BIOL 200, and BIOL 213.
    Priority:  Biology seniors, then seniors (any major), then juniors.

  
  • BIOL 411 - Seminar: Conservation Biology

    FC NSMA WADV
    4 credits
    A discussion format is used to study important biological concepts pertaining to the conservation and management of biodiversity. Papers from the current primary literature are used to cover topics such as conservation genetics, habitat fragmentation, and invasive species. Genetic and life history variation, species diversity, and community ecology are examined in relation to habitat conservation. Students alternate as discussion leaders; term papers and oral presentations required of all students.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 103 or BIOL 200. Preference to juniors and seniors.
    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • BIOL 416 - Seminar: Cellular Basis of Human Disease

    FC NSMA QFR WADV
    4 credits
    The basis of human disease lies in dysfunctional cellular behavior due to mutation, damage, or infection. This course will connect the investigation of molecular genetic and basic cell biology to the treatment of diseases such as cancer. The course material will focus on research articles presented and discussed by students. A wide range of topics and research techniques will be covered.
    Prerequisites & Notes: BIOL 213
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 27