Feb 24, 2024  
Course Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Course Catalog 2022-2023 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Search


This is a comprehensive listing of all active, credit-bearing courses offered by Oberlin College and Conservatory since Fall 2016. Courses listed this online catalog may not be offered every semester; for up to date information on which courses are offered in a given semester, please see PRESTO. 

For the most part, courses offered by departments are offered within the principal division of the department. Many interdisciplinary departments and programs also offer courses within more than one division.

Individual courses may be counted simultaneously toward more than one General Course Requirement providing they carry the appropriate divisional attributes and/or designations.

 

Cinema Studies

  
  • CINE 323 - Theory and History of Global Cinema

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    Not only was cinema the global mass medium of the twentieth century, but now globalization has come to be the defining characteristic of cinema in the twenty-first century. This course provides a critical framework for studying contemporary cinema by introducing students to theoretical debates about the category of “global cinema” through historical analysis of film production, distribution, and reception globally. We will attend to the history of internationalism in cinema from its earliest days to the contemporary moment, the role of film festivals in defining a global cinema aesthetics, and transnational influences in popular cinema industries across the world.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290 or consent of instructor.
  
  • CINE 324 - Video Production Workshop II: The Short Film

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    The short film is a distinct form, with its own limits and possibilities. Put another way, short films, whether fiction, non-fiction, or experimental, are not simply reduced versions of feature-length films. In this advanced production workshop, students will consider the Short in its historical, formal, and industrial contexts, but mostly they will practice the art of conceiving, producing, and exhibiting short films.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290, CINE 298, and consent of instructor.
  
  • CINE 325 - Imagining Immanence

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    From the vantage point of a seemingly triumphant scientific modernism, Freud declared religion’s fate to be “the future of an illusion.” How, then, do we make sense of the persistence and flourishing of theological concerns in contemporary culture? In exploring this complex question, we will focus on works of literature and cinema (perhaps other arts) that explore questions of meaning in broad, deep and specific terms. American, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled ‘Advanced Courses.’ Also acceptable: CINE 110 or CINE 111 and a Cinematic Traditions Course, OR CINE 290 or CINE 299. This course may also count for the major in CMPL.
  
  • CINE 326 - First Person Cinema: Personal Narrative

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Acknowledging the importance of exploring and chronicling life during times of political unrest and instability, this course introduces students to personal narrative and autobiographical essay forms of media making. We will take a close look at several independent filmmakers who have made personal narrative works that engage with their respective political contexts in order to understand how in cinema the personal can be political.  Emphasizing the composition of stories rather than the use of any particular technology or device, students will produce personal narratives in a variety of media and styles.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Recommended preparation: at least one previous Cinema course. Consent of instructor required.
  
  • CINE 328 - Media Networks: Interconnections of History and Theory

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Drawing on media and literary studies, sociology, and science, this course aims at presenting a historically informed conceptualization of networked media as a cultural metaphor and a material arrangement.
  
  • CINE 329 - Chinese Queer Cinema

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    This seminar surveys Chinese-language queer cinema since the 1960s up to the contemporary period in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. It investigates the visual representation of gay, lesbian, and transgender desires within different historical and cultural contexts. While studying the historical development of queer in each region and the mutual influences across the regions, the course particularly discusses the way cinema mobilizes the notion of queer as a trope for socio-political discourses, and the way the representation of queer negotiates with mainstream ideologies.
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 324


  
  • CINE 331 - Docufiction

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course investigates the porous boundary between fiction and non-fiction in the cinema. We move from the early ethnographic documentaries of the 1920s through the explosion of documentary work in the 1960s to the recent emergence of the hybrid category of docufiction. Topics to be explored include observation, reenactment, memory, subjectivity and truth. Each week our discussions will be informed by an historically significant film pitched at the border of documentary and fiction.
  
  • CINE 332 - The Autobiographical Film

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Autobiography has proven to be one of the richest and most enduring modes of cinematic storytelling. This could seem paradoxical, since authorial presence runs counter to one of the great rules of classical Hollywood filmmaking: that the film/maker remain invisible. What happens when filmmakers take leave of this arbitrary rule and turn the camera on themselves? What happens when self-inscription becomes not an obstruction to filmmaking but its very purpose? Students in this class will consider autobiography as a cinematic discourse encompassing aspects of fiction, documentary, experimental, and performance modes, as well as strategies of portraiture, confession, memoir, and reenactment.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290
  
  • CINE 335 - Advanced Cinematic Storytelling

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This course builds on developed skills for writing dramatic, documentary and other visually rendered stories for screens of all types and sizes. Students are expected to have experience in critical studies courses in Cinema or literature departments and/or studio courses in Cinema, Creative Writing, Theatre or related disciplines. Applications will include plans for projects that are already in development.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Coursework or experience in Cinema, Theatre, literature or other narrative and visual arts; an application that includes a substantial project that is already in process. Or consent of the instructor.
  
  • CINE 342 - Experiments in Moving Image and Sound II

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This is a hands-on advanced media production course for students who seek to work on large scale moving image and sound projects across genres and forms. We will study the work of international artists, performers and filmmakers, visit the Allen Memorial Art Museum, The Cleveland Cinematheque and the Cleveland Museum of Art. Designed for advanced students to deepen their creative media making skills and to create fully realized projects and collaborations. Projects can take many forms; animation, personal narrative, performance, video installation and multichannel projection with live musical accompaniment, etc. Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 298
  
  • CINE 347 - When Old Media Were New

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    In this class we will take a critical approach to contemporary media technologies by unearthing failed and forgotten media oddities of the past. We will theorize what media were and speculate about what they can potentially become by putting our historical studies of old media (pre-cinematic optical devices, gramophones, and panoramas) in juxtaposition with our explorations of new media (PS5, 3D cinema, Zoom). Course topics will include considerations about whether media can “die,” the specter of zombie media, and new media in their geographic contexts.
    Prerequisites & Notes: prerequisite Cinema 290 or consent of instructor
  
  • CINE 350 - The Poetics and Politics of French Documentary and the Essay Film

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course addresses documentary cinema from France, from the invention of the Lumiere cinematographe in 1896 to digital filmmaking at the beginning of the 21st century. The special focus of Spring 2020 will be the ethics of care; films will address a variety of topics, from reproductive rights and health care to workplace ethics and the current refugee crisis, all addressed by French and Francophone filmmakers who have tackled documentary poetics, politics, and ethics since the invention of the Lumie cinematograph in 1895. Taught in English.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290 or 299, FREN/CINE 250, or the equivalent.
  
  • CINE 354 - Actors, Stars, and the World Stage

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course addresses the complex and undertheorized place that actors and stars occupy both in cinema, whose history normally prioritizes the film director. Case studies will delve into the cultural labor and capital of individuals such as Jane Fonda, Marlon Brando, and Simone Signoret, while exploring their many contributions to art and politics, the uses of their visibility.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290 and CINE 250/FREN 320.
  
  • CINE 358 - Feminist Media Histories

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    In this course we will explore media history from a global intersectional feminist perspective. We will examine the contributions of artists, audiences/users, inventors, media executives, and technicians from computing pioneer Ada Lovelace to television director and Oberlin alum Shirley Graham Du Bois, to interrogate the relationship between gender, sexuality, and power in media history. The central question of the course is how an attention to media history from an intersectional feminist perspective may reorient our understanding and connection to media today.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • CINE 360 - Strange Cinema

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course will explore the effect of strangeness in movies. What are the ways in which this effect is created? To what uses do filmmakers put the experience of strangeness? What baseline of familiar do we use to judge strange movies? We will explore strangeness as both a poetics and an aesthetic, and its relation to effects such as the uncanny, the fantastic, the marvelous, and the wonderful.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 110, 290, 298, or 299 or consent of the instructor.
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 361


  
  • CINE 361 - Time & the Human Condition

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Through an examination of a variety of visual media, including painting, still photography, cinema, and internet art, this course explores how the emergence of cinematic time (Doane) has affected our perception of the human condition. Screenings will include works by Bill Viola, Godfrey Reggio, Masaki Kobayashi, Stanley Kubrick, Orson Welles, Alain Resnais, Chris Marker, and Peter Greenaway, among others. Students will be asked to read novels, 20th-century philosophical treatises, cultural studies, and film theory.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290 or consent of instructor.
  
  • CINE 362 - New Issues in Documentary

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This advanced seminar studies the trends, problems and recent milestones of the contemporary documentary, including docudrama and the emerging genre of docufiction. Different modules examine distinct areas of focus including the war on terror, the modern family, nature and the environment, and social activism. What effect has the digital revolution had on the documentary film? What strategies have documentary filmmakers innovated to engage with 21st century experience?
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290
  
  • CINE 363 - Bodies of Laughter: The Slapstick Film Comedy

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course will provide a thorough introduction to the historical formation and aesthetic principles of American slapstick comedy, as well as a survey of critical approaches to the genre. We will investigate the nature of laughter and the comic, as well as consider how theoretical approaches to film genre respond (or fail to respond) to the complex, mutable, and reflexive nature of the slapstick film.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290 or consent of instructor.
  
  • CINE 364 - Advanced Film Making Projects

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course is designed for students who have already take a 300 level course and want to pursue a project–a group designed or individual project- in film making. Students will submit a proposal and description of the project before enrolling in the course. Limited to 12 students
    Prerequisites & Notes: A previous 300 level production course.
  
  • CINE 370 - Francophone Cinemas of the African Diaspora

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course introduces students to the filmmaking practices in the French and adjacent languages (ie. Créole, Bambara, Wolof, etc.) from the African diaspora (Sub-Saharan Africa, the Maghreb, and the Caribbean).  We will address the social, economic and political conditions shaping the development of cinema as an artistic, social and political practice.  Taught in English, although expertise in the French language will be much appreciated.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 250/FREN 320 or equivalent
    This course is cross-listed with FREN 470


  
  • CINE 372 - Contemporary Literary Theory: Post-Modernity and Imagination

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course is about developments in literary theory in the context of the last 35 years of American intellectual and artistic culture. Our concern will be understanding literary theories in their historical and institutional contexts as well as considering their value as ways of thinking about literature and art. We’ll pay particular attention to the impact of post-structuralism on American critics, the relation of literary criticism to cultural criticism, and various elaborations of the idea of post-modernity. American, Post-1900.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290, ENGL 275/CMPL 200, or ENGL 299, or any two 200-Level English courses, or consent of the instructor.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 372, ENGL 372


  
  • CINE 375 - Realism, 1800 to the Present: The Mirror Up to Nature

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    Realism, though not the radical project it was, remains a significant part of contemporary culture. The tension between accurate reproduction of ‘reality’ and the creation of meaningful aesthetic form gives Realism its dynamic quality. Realism negotiates between the possibilities and limitations of representation in media such as the novel, drama, painting, photography, cinema, and television. The course will explore what realism was and its legacy, drawing from American, British, Irish, French, Italian, and Russian traditions.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENGL 275/CMPL 200, or CINE 290, or ENGL 299, or any two 200-Level English courses, or consent of the instructor.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 376, ENGL 375


  
  • CINE 377 - Narrative Across Platforms

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This advanced seminar studies the theory and craft of narrative in the cinema from a range of disciplinary approaches. Topics to be investigated include temporality, perspective, causality, affect, suspense, resolution and surprise. Our discussions will connect individual films with both practical and philosophical texts. Finally, we will consider the challenge presented to traditional narrative by the rise of interactive entertainment.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290
  
  • CINE 381 - Hopeful Monsters: (Mixed-)Media Studies

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course looks at hybrid media forms across historical, national and aesthetic boundaries. What happens when generally distinct aesthetic forms and practices are merged? What do they reveal about the nature of the original media they are constructed from? How is interpretive activity challenged by such works? Our objects of study will include visual art, experimental poetry, innovative memoir, essay-films, narrative and documentary cinema, graphic and experimental fiction and more.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the English Program section titled ‘Advanced Courses.’ Also acceptable: Any 100- or 200-Level Cinema Studies course.
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 381


  
  • CINE 398 - New Wave, New Hollywood, New Cinema Studies

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    We will study various New Waves that characterize world cinema in the mid-20th century, particularly the French Nouvelle Vague (1958-1964) and American New Hollywood (1968-1974). The trope of the new wave or the tradition of the new according to critic Harold Rosenberg has enjoyed a powerful hold on filmmakers, historians and critics. Therefore, we examine how the discipline of Cinema Studies developed simultaneously with the advent of these New Waves. How and why do we understand cinema in terms of New Waves? And how has Cinema Studies been shaped by this traditionbecoming perhaps the last new wave of cinema?
    Prerequisites & Notes: CINE 290 or 299 and consent of the instructor.
  
  • CINE 399F - Cinema Studies Practicum - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This practicum allows students to produce substantial independent work of their own design.
  
  • CINE 399H - Cinema Studies Practicum - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    This practicum allows students to produce substantial independent work of their own design.
  
  • CINE 980 - Transmedia Storytelling in Japanese Cinema

    FC
    4 credits
    Recently, Hollywood cinema has embraced a business model of building large franchises that exploitnumerous extra-cinematic media and merchandise: TV spinoffs, novel adaptations, toys, magazine tie-ins, comic books, theme parks, and video games, amongst others. Media scholar Henry Jenkins calls thisapproach to filmmaking, transmedia storytelling. Unlike earlier franchises, transmedia films are notstand alone, self-contained texts but spread narrative and character information across a wide platformof media. This course examines how Japanese cinema has long embraced such strategies.Anthropologist Mizuko Ito describes the practice in Japan as media mix. This class will study how Japan’s long history of media mix and transmedia storytelling situates Japanese cinema within a wide range of visual media, historical myths, cultural rituals, and industrial practices.
  
  • CINE 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • CINE 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Classics

  
  • CLAS 103 - History of Greece

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Greece has been associated with the birth of Democracy, the stand of the 300 Spartans, and the conquests of Alexander the Great. This course surveys the history of the Greek speaking world from the Prehistoric period to the death of Cleopatra. Special attention will be paid to ancient documents, art, and architecture. In addition to military and political developments, the course will also analyze the Greek world through the eyes of women, slaves, and foreigners.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 130


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CLAS 104 - History of Rome

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Gladiators! Decadence! Empire! This course will survey the history of Rome, from its prehistoric origins to the collapse of the Western Empire in the fifth century CE. We will pay close attention to networks of social power, the impact of imperialism, and the unity and diversity of what it meant to be ‘Roman.’ The course will engage with military history, slavery, the rise of Christianity, indigenous or ‘pagan’ religious practices, and resistance. Readings from the ancient sources will provide the basis for discussions.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 129


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CLAS 111 - Greek and Roman Epic

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Love, betrayal, revenge, war, fidelity, homecoming, exile, and new beginnings. The earliest literature in the Western tradition arrived in the 8th centry BCE in the central Mediterranean, with the epic stories of Achilles, Agamemenon, Helen, Odysseus, Penelope, Aeneas, and Dido. In this course we will read the Iliad, Odyssey, and Aeneid, and consider some of the literary and artistic works of the later Western tradition that they have inspired. We will also study the unique oral-poetic form of the early epics, and discuss the central issues of heroism, mortality, and identity that they invoke.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CLAS 112 - Greek and Roman Drama in Translation

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Greek drama has cast a long shadow over theatrical history. This class examines the original plays and their reception from Aristophanes to Shakespeare. The first half of the semester is spent reading plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, highlighting the various ways the plays were understood in antiquity and today (from performance criticism to Freud and Lacan). In the second half of the semester we investigate comedies by Aristophanes, Plautus, and Terence, before tackling the complex “theater of blood” of Seneca. We finish the semester exploring both the comic and tragic traditions as exemplified by select plays of Shakespeare.
  
  • CLAS 201 - Magic and Mystery Ancient World

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course surveys the evidence for magic and the occult in antiquity, focusing on the traditions of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Topics covered include theoretical approaches to magic, practitioners (witches, sorcerers, and priests), magical objects (curse tablets, ritual figurines, and amulets), magical words (spells and prayers), ancient mystery cults, and the interaction between early Christianity and magic. Special attention will be paid to how ancient individuals interacted with the unseen world in their daily lives, and when and how they employed the services of professional magicians. Readings of ancient sources in translation and classroom discussion.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CLAS 203 - The City in Antiquity

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Urban centers have been important aspects of human life for more than 5000 years, and the city played a central role in the development of Greek and Roman society. This course will investigate the function of the city in classical antiquity by studying a number of urban centers, including Mycenae, Athens, Alexandria, Pergamon, Rome, Pompeii, Palmyra and Constantinople. Topics will include the urban plan, monumental architecture, domestic space, and social interaction. Studies of architectural and archaeological remains will be complemented by readings of ancient sources in translation.
  
  • CLAS 209 - The Ancient and Modern Novel

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course will take as its point of departure the surviving novels of Greek and Roman antiquity. We will read a selection of Greek novels, as well as Petronius’ Satyricon and Apuleius’ Metamorphoses . To these ancient works we will compare a series of modern novels, especially Epitaph of a Small Winner by Machado de Assis and Kennedy’s Confederacy of Dunces . The course will also pursue critical and theoretical issues regarding the genre of the novel raised by Bakhtin, Lukacs, Winkler and others. All works will be read in translation.
  
  • CLAS 210 - Greek and Roman Mythology

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Gods, monsters, heroines, and heroes! We will survey some of the major Greek and Roman myths, paying particular attention to the ways that “myths” – a set of commonly held stories within a culture – reflect and shape the societies that produce them. In addition to reading narratives from the primary sources, we will look at several modern theories of myth-interpretation, including anthropological, psychoanalytic, structuralist, and post-structuralist approaches.
  
  • CLAS 217 - The Age of Nero

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course uses the controversial emperor Nero to investigate how history is written and reputations are cemented. Our investigation will incorporate ancient authors (including Petronius, Seneca, Lucan, and Tacitus) in translation, modern scholarship, and evidence from architecture, art, and archaeology. Topics include decadence & style in literature, art, and politics; women and youth in power; senatorial resistance to the emperor; and Nero’s reputation from Revelation to Looney Tunes
  
  • CLAS 219 - Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Study of the construction of gender and sexual identities in ancient Greece and Rome. Emphasis will be on primary texts that demonstrate notions of sexual practice and/or identity, such as Aristophanes’ Thesmophoriazousae , Plato’s Symposium , Aeschines’ Against Timarchos , and poetry of Sappho, Catullus, Ovid, Martial, Juvenal. We will also read modern critical theorists (Foucault, Halperin, Richlin, Winkler), and will interrogate the accuracy of their arguments.
  
  • CLAS 222 - Ovid and the Middle Ages

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    We will read several of the central works of Ovid (in translation) in conjunction with medieval literature that imitates, invokes, or develops Ovid?s literary corpus. We will emphasize reading and imitation as modes of interpretation, and consider how scholars of the medieval period saw themselves as inheriting and continuing a distinct literary tradition. Texts include Ovid’s Amores, Heroides, and Metamorphses, various Chaucerian works, the Roman de la Rose, and the letters of Abelard and Heloise. Pre-1700.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 222, ENGL 209


  
  • CLAS 251 - Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course will survey the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Mediterranean, focusing on the artistic production of Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Special attention will be paid to the representation of the human form and the systematic uses of art to reify power and empire. The course will draw extensively on the collections of the Allen Memorial Museum of Art.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Classics or Art History
  
  • CLAS 307 - Roman Egypt: Art, Culture, History

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Between 323 BCE and the 7th century, Egypt was inhabited by a multitude of ethnic groups, including Persians, Jews, Greeks, Egyptians and Romans. Yet, Egyptian culture and heritage, particularly in the realm of religion and art, remained vibrant. Through thematic topics rather than a strict chronological approach, this course surveys the artistic, social, political and cultural history of Greco-Roman Egypt.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 100- or 200 - Level course in Classics Dept.
  
  • CLAS 308 - Ancient Greek & Roman Science

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course investigates the foundations of scientific disciplines such as physics, meteorology, chemistry, and biology through a reading of Greek and Latin scientific and philosophical texts (in translation). In addition to classroom discussion, there will be multiple fieldtrips, ‘maker’ experiments, and models that get at the heart of ancient Greek and Roman problem solving.
  
  • CLAS 351 - Pompeii: Life and Afterlife

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    Buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 CE, the city of Pompeii is the best preserved city from the ancient world. Replete with evidence from daily life, Pompeii offers a unique window into many aspects of Roman culture, from religion and literature, to diet and sex. This seminar-style course will survey the history and afterlife of Pompeii, with a special focus on archaeological and epigraphic evidence.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 1 course in Classics.
  
  • CLAS 401F - Honors - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Honors. Enrollment by submission of a proposal and approval by the department.
  
  • CLAS 401H - Honors - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Honors. Enrollment by submission of a proposal and approval by the department.
  
  • CLAS 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • CLAS 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Cognitive Science

  
  • COGS 101 - Mind, Brain, and Behavior: An Introduction to Cognitive Sciences

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Cognitive Science is the multidisciplinary study of the mental structures and processes involved in sensation, perception, consciousness, attention, memory, problem solving, reasoning, and language. We will draw on the fields of philosophy, psychology, computer science, neuroscience, linguistics, and anthropology in consideration of the types of questions and methodology that comprise cognitive science. Further, we will consider the many real world applications in the fields of engineering, computer science, marketing, education, medicine, and the law.
  
  • COGS 995F - Private Reading -Full

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

College Music

  
  • CMUS 400 - Senior Honors

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    TBA
  
  • CMUS 401 - Senior Honors

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    TBA

Comparative American Studies

  
  • CAST 050 - Cleveland Immersion Program

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    This module course connects students to Northeast Ohio through its community and business leaders, regional organizations, and local alumni. It is offered M-W during the mid-semester recess with evening meetings in the weeks before and after. You will learn about the history, challenges, and opportunities of Greater Cleveland in six themes: social justice, sustainability, entrepreneurship, economic development, arts and culture, and community leadership. You will practice networking skills, gain professional and academic contacts, conduct site visits, and research a project of your choice. Field trips required.
    This course is cross-listed with SOCI 050


  
  • CAST 100 - Introduction to Comparative American Studies

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    The course will introduce students to the complexity of American social and cultural formations, with particular emphases on sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and gender, and to various methodologies of comparative analysis.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CAST 106 - The History of Rock: Race, Class, Gender, Place

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The history of rock and roll is one complicated by the places where it was born- multiple sites across the United States that grapple with race, class, gender, and ethnicity. In the course, students will uncover the layers of political, social, and cultural shifts that continue to shape and reshape rock and roll and its branches. Beginning with commercial recording in the early 20th century and continuing through today, we will investigate popular music as it has grown from its largely African-American roots to a diffuse (and often contentious) art form with global reach.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CAST 200 - Theories and Methods in American Studies

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course introduces students to both historical developments and current theories and methodologies in the field of American Studies. It also establishes shared keywords, theoretical principles and methodological approaches for the major. This formal introduction to theories and methods will prepare students for the diverse range of approaches they will meet later in both the core and cross-listed courses approved for the CAS major.
  
  • CAST 201 - Latinas/os in Comparative Perspective

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course analyzes the varied experiences of Latinas/os in the United States. Using ethnography, literature, film, and history, this course will explore questions of immigration/transnationalism; culture and political economy; racial, ethnic, gender, and sexual identities among Latinas/os; the struggle for place in American cities; as well as the intersections of gender, work and family.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 201


  
  • CAST 202 - Visible Bodies and the Politics of Sexuality

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course considers how visual culture produces and contests concepts of sexuality in American society. We will analyze how mainstream culture universalizes certain experiences of gender and sexuality, as they are inflected by race, ethnicity, class and nationalism, as well as how marginalized groups have used visual representation to contest and subvert these hegemonic ideals. Through case studies, we will explore concepts such as the gaze, spectacle, and agency.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 202


  
  • CAST 207 - Introduction to Queer Studies

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course provides an interdisciplinary grounding in historical and theoretical foundations of queer culture and theory. We will explore LGBTQ history alongside contemporary queer cultural studies. This course will address the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, ability, age, nationality, and religion. We will explore how historical, social, political, and economic systems have shaped and reshaped what it means to be queer or claim queer identity in the United States and abroad. Students will engage with multiple disciplinary approaches that have both shaped queer studies and have been shaped by queer methodology.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 207


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CAST 208 - Which American Life?

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course offers a tour of the Americas that radio and podcasts have made. We will examine the radio as a medium and meeting place for activists, artists, corporations, demagogues, djs, journalists, religious figures, and scientists aiming to mobilize, entertain, enrage, inform, and study American publics. Students will be encouraged to think critically about what we’re doing when we tune into (or tune out) certain kinds of sounds, paying special attention to how identity is made audible.
  
  • CAST 209 - American Identities and Popular Culture

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This interdisciplinary course examines how popular cultural forms such as news media, film, and social media have historically contributed to changing notions of identity, belonging, and citizenship. Americans have long hailed innovations in media technologies as democratic spaces that expand the possibilities of inclusion even as commentators criticize popular culture for sustaining normative ideals of identity. We will address these competing trends by studying how cultural producers rely on contested concepts of gender, sexuality, race, ability and social class to navigate the politics of visibility in different media.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 209


  
  • CAST 210 - Sanctuary, Solidarity, and Latina/o/x Practices of Accompaniment

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    What are the roots of todays sanctuary movements? And how are these practices similar to solidarity movements, past and present? This course locates contemporary sanctuary movements in a longer history of Central America sanctuary practices of the 1980s and Latinx solidarity struggles in the 1960s. By interrogating the meaning of sanctuary, solidarity and accompaniment and examining the conditions that enable Latinx struggles to be linked with those of Black, Native American, Muslim and queer activism, this course provides critical insight into the enduring practices and challenges of sanctuary, refuge and resistance in America.
    Community Based Learning
  
  • CAST 211 - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Identities

    FC CD
    4 credits
    This course examines the production of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer identities in the United States as they intersect with important social markers such as race, class, gender, and nation. Situating specific case studies in historical, social, and comparative context, we explore issues such as the intersection of racial and sexual sciences, processes of community formation, the politics of embodiment, social justice movements and queer cultural productions.
  
  • CAST 214 - Friends, Foes, and Feminism: Relationships in Contemporary U.S. Novels

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    We will explore complexities of human relationships, among friends, family, lovers, colleagues, community members, and strangers as they are portrayed in contemporary U.S. novels. Of particular interest will be the ways in which these relationships (fraught? friendly?) blur lines between love and hate, respect and animosity, civility and hostility, empathy and apathy. Using feminist theory as a lens, we will also pay particular attention to characters’ identities (i.e., race, gender, class, sexuality, and more).
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 214


  
  • CAST 215 - Minor Feelings: An Introduction to Affect Studies

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Feelings matter, but are they political? How and when do feelings meaningfully bridge differences between people? Can tuning in to our emotional lives help us transform the world? This introductory course will approach such questions through the field of affect studies.  We will read foundational texts by Raymond Williams, Sianne Ngai, and Lauren Berlant, as well as recent work by Cathy Park Hong, Leticia Alvarado, Rebecca Solnit, and José Esteban Muñoz in order to probe the ever-shifting relationship between emotional states and social states. Focusing in on specific affects-including anger, hope, depression, and pity-we will place emphasis on the way artists, intellectuals, and activists have made connections between affective experience and efforts to resist oppression based on race, gender, sexuality, and class.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CAST 223 - Surviving America: Introduction to Native Studies

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This class offers an introduction to the field of Native Studies and its approaches to the study of indigenous nations in the United States and around the world. Native Studies seeks to understand indigenous peoples from a range of critical and disciplinary perspectives, and to undertake research to address the problems created by histories of settler colonialism and the mistreatment and misrepresentations of indigenous peoples. This course explores critical issues facing Native communities including legal and cultural identities, revitalization, environmental racism, transnationalism, indigenous feminisms, gender and sexuality, and indigenous sovereignty.
    This course is cross-listed with ENVS 223


    Sustainability
  
  • CAST 229 - How We Look: Visualizing US Identities

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course examines how visual media–like paintings, magazines, television, and Instagram feeds– teach us to look at one another. We will pay special attention to the processes by which certain bodies, activities, and forms of life become visually coded as “normal” in the US mainstream, while others are marked as “different.” We will also explore techniques developed by artists and intellectuals working from the margins to subvert these conventions. During the semester, students will learn to conduct visual analysis, as well as to creatively experiment with modes of resisting the visual constructions that shape their own lives.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CAST 231 - The Coalition of the Future: How We Combat White Nationalism and Weave the Fabric of Democracy

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    The 2020 presidential election caused a number of observers to suggest that the United States is more deeply divided than ever before, and that the survival of democracy itself is threatened. This course is intended for students who wish to challenge the hopelessness of this view by exploring the politics of white nationalism through the lens of community building and organizing. Students will grapple with the intersections between antisemitism and racism and the ways they conspire in white nationalist ideology to threaten our democracy. The class will focus on political ideologies, systems of oppression, social movements, as well as social change in practice. We will consider the history of white nationalism and white supremacy, examine how they affect Black and Jewish communities as well as the broader society, and ultimately focus on the hands-on work on engaging in difficult conversations to build alliances and create broader coalitions for change.
  
  • CAST 232 - History of Race in American Cities and Suburbs

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course explores the social and cultural history of American cities and suburbs as sites of ethnic formation and community and interracial and interethnic contestation/struggle, with a focus on major developments and examples from the twentieth century. Case studies on urban unrest, the rise of ethnoburbs, gentrification, and other topics will illuminate distinct histories and places, while weaving together a broad understanding of how urban change, suburbanization, migration, economic restructuring, and political organizing have transformed American life and the experiences of racial and ethnic minorities.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 232


  
  • CAST 248 - Asian American Reckonings: An Introduction to Asian American Studies

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Borrowing its title from Cathy Park Hong’s inimitable memoir, Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning , this course provides an introduction to Asian American studies foregrounding relevant historical contexts and theoretical frameworks that interrogate major “flashpoints” in Asian American studies, to use a term from Cathy J. Schlund-Vial’s recent edited collection by the same name. Schlund-Vial’s contends that “a flashpoint demands-in the face of political calamity and systemic oppression-reflection, response, and recalibration” (2). “Flashpoints” with considerable bearing on this course include Chinese immigration and exclusion, Japanese internment/incarceration, U.S. colonialism in the Philippines, the consequences of the Korean and Viet Nam wars, the model minority myth, Asian American mental health, resistance to model minority discourses, and recent pandemic fallout. Surveying fiction, essays, graphic narratives, folklore, short stories, poems, archival documents, and the interdisciplinary critical work of an expansive array of Asian American scholars and writers, coursework examines the intimate connections, provocations, and reckonings inherent in the study of race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, disability, language, citizenship, and nation in the 20th and 21st centuries.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CAST 256 - Immigration in U.S. History

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    History of immigration and migration in the United States, from nineteenth to early twenty-first centuries. Includes international context of migration, migrants encounters with American society, policy responses, and significance of immigration in American culture. Also covers internal migrations such as the Great Migration of blacks from the South. The aim is to provide introduction to major developments in the history of U.S. im/migration, historicize contemporary debates, and develop comparative understanding of experiences among Asians, Blacks, Europeans, Latinos.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 256


    Community Based Learning
  
  • CAST 260 - Asian American History

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the history of peoples of Asian ancestry in the United States and the construction of an Asian American collectivity. Major themes will include the place of Asian Americans in the American imagination, migrations, labor, communities, and responses to social and legal discrimination. The categories of race, ethnicity, gender, class and sexuality will figure prominently as we explore similarities and differences among Asian American experiences.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 260


  
  • CAST 261 - Contemporary Arab American Literature

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Joe Kadi in his introduction to the seminal collection, Food for Our Grandmothers: Writings by Arab-American and Arab-Canadian Feminists (1994), refers to the Arab community’s “invisibility” (xix) as “the most invisible of the invisibles” (xix). In the Post 9/11 Era this distinction is no longer as apt as it was in the mid-nineties, but indeed the stigma of Arabs and Muslims as terrorists and fundamentalists has created an entirely new kind of (in)visibility/hyper-visibility. Much of the visibility that surrounds Arabs in the popular imagination today continues to be shaped by racism, bigotry, misinformation, and propaganda. Arab American writers challenge this kind of mindless mainstream demonization and Hollywood vilification by evoking complex, personal, communal, national, cultural, historical, political and religious realities that manifest themselves at home and elsewhere. Contemporary Arab American Literature studies Arab American literature from 1990 to the present. Students examine novels, short fiction, memoirs, film, comics, plays, and poetry in an effort to understand the major concerns of contemporary Arab American artists, scholars, and activists. In addition to a discussion of formal literary concerns, this course is animated by how writers interrogate questions of race, class, gender, sexuality, politics, religion, and history.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CAST 270 - Latina/o History

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    What historical forces have brought together diverse groups including Chicanos from Los Angeles, Cubans from Miami, and Dominicans and Puerto Ricans from New York City? From the 16th century to the present, we map the varied terrains of Latina/o history. Major themes include: conquest and resistance, immigration, work, and the creation of racial and sexual differences within and between Latino/a communities. We survey Latina/o writers from Cabeza de Vaca to Jose Marti to Gloria Anzaldua.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 270


  
  • CAST 284 - Disability and Queer Community Health in a Time of Pandemic

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Queer and disability communities have historically developed systems for managing limited access to healthcare in times of crisis. From the HIV/AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and 90s to current disparities in healthcare access and treatment, marginalized communities have responded to past and ongoing health crises by creating community networks of care and justice. As we find ourselves in this present moment of a declared worldwide pandemic, the recommendation of “social distancing” creates a new problem for how to imagine care and health justice in already under-serviced communities. This module course will think historically and contemporaneously about care work and public health activism in a time of crisis to (re)imagine community care and health education during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 284


  
  • CAST 302 - American Agricultures

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course examines agrarian thinking and food justice movements in the United States through literature, essays, film, and field trips. We learn about the political philosophy of democratic agrarianism, particularly as articulated by the New Agrarianism movement, and the contributions of indigenous, enslaved, and immigrant peoples to American agricultural practices and foodways. Throughout the course we pay close attention to the Rust Belt as a location of contemporary work for food justice. Field trips are required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 201 or consent of the instructor.
    This course is cross-listed with ENVS 302


    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • CAST 309 - Performing America

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    What does it mean to be American? How do we conceive of the geographical, political, national, and social spaces that constitute “America” or “the Americas”? This course will enter into these questions via an engagement with performance theory, adopting an expansive notion of “performance” to investigate what it means to perform and critique Americanness. Examining histories of rite and ritual, transatlantic funerary performance, protest, field performances by migrant laborers, digital media, and staged performances that engage with how gender, race, class, sexuality, and immigration status inform one’s sense of America, we will explore how performance transmits knowledge and contributes to worldmaking practices that shape identity, nation, and politics.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 309


  
  • CAST 311 - Militarization of American Daily Life

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    How have war and war preparation shaped daily life in the United States? What have been the repercussions of militarization beyond United States geopolitical boundaries? This course takes a broad view of American daily life to consider how war, war preparation, and the underlying assumption that war is a natural fact of life shape the experiences of people throughout the Americas, as well as the globalizing reach of American military power throughout the 20th century.
  
  • CAST 312 - Cultures of Surveillance

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Open to sophomores and above, this seminar examines surveillance as an omnipresent force in the United States. From CCTV to biometric scans, we will explore the impacts of surveillance technologies on different communities, paying particular attention to the vastly unequal and oppressive impacts on marginalized and vulnerable groups. We will also explore counter-surveillance practices by journalists, writers, and artists, and other cultural activists who often use these same technologies to expose, denounce, embarrass or contest state actions.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CAST 100, 200 or equivalent.
  
  • CAST 313 - Archives and Affects

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    We often think of archives as repositories, usually housed in special collections of libraries but also increasingly transferred to digital servers, that collect books, papers, and other objects to help piece together a historical record. In this class, we will ask how we might expand that conception of the archive by engaging with ephemeral archives, or the “repertoire”, alongside notions of everyday archives and the body as archive. In so doing, we will also expand our thinking about what can be done with archives and their objects through affective, or complex emotional engagement, with memory and history. This course is a study in archive theory, affect theory, and (queer) object relations. Students will keep journals on object lessons and will experiment in different writing genres that will help them approach the archive from multiple critical perspectives. We will also focus our inquiry on populations that have historically been left out of major national archives, including queer and trans people and POC.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 313


  
  • CAST 315 - Brown TV

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    Can watching TV help us understand the world around us? How has the small screen left its mark on our social imagination? In this course, we will approach such questions by examining the relationship between televisual phenomena and contemporary debates about Latinx identities. We will discuss identification, representation, and belonging as we analyze a wide range of programs-including I Love Lucy, Chico and the Man, Modern Family, Vida, and Los Espookys-alongside critical texts drawn from the fields of Latinx studies and media studies. We will also experiment with relevant genres of public writing, such as the review.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Previous coursework in CAST is recommended though not required
  
  • CAST 317 - Transgender Cultural Studies

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    In the United States, we are in a ?transgender moment,? or what Time magazine has called a ?transgender tipping point.? In this course, we explore what this moment means for the representation of trans* experience. We will look intersectionally, historically, and globally through multiple genres to interrogate what trans culture is and how we study it. We will ask how interlocking systems of oppression dictate and drive representation and narrative and how trans artists work within or resist these systems to (re)construct their own narratives and images. Together, we will build a digital archive of trans culture.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GSFS/CAST 100, GSFS 101
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 317


  
  • CAST 318 - Seminar: American Orientalism

    FC SSCI CD WINT
    4 credits
    Through readings and work on original research projects, students will study how ideas about “Orientals” have shaped historical understandings of American identity, from the late eighteenth century onward. Topics of examination include: Chinese “coolies” during Reconstruction; constructions of gender and sexual deviance; wartime representations of Asian enemies; Cold War origins of the Model Minority; revival of Yellow Perilism in contemporary life.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prior coursework in CAST or a related field strongly recommended
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 318


  
  • CAST 319 - Sexual “Absences”

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    This course explores how the absence of sex has been uniquely constructed through American histories and politics of race and sexuality. Several scholars have charted the history of sexuality through desire, practice, and identity, which resulted in the invention of sexual categories like heterosexuality and homosexuality. But few have looked at the history of sexuality in America through the lens of absence. In this course, we will explore how abstinence, celibacy, virginity, chastity, and asexuality have been historically and rhetorically shaped by the sexual revolution, capitalism and the industrial revolution, sexology, religion, and social justice movements in the United States.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CAST/GSFS 100, GSFS 101.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 319


  
  • CAST 335 - Latinx Oral Histories

    FC SSCI CD WADV
    4 credits
    This advanced course introduces students to the importance of oral histories in ethnographic research as a foundation to explore the histories and contemporary experiences of Latinx communities in Lorain and Northeast Ohio. This class will focus on theories, practices, and ethics involved in oral history and ethnographic projects in order to equip students with the necessary tools to understand the distinctive role that personal narratives play in capturing the complexity of Latinx life in Northeast Ohio. We will collaborate with community partners in collecting oral histories and locate these histories in a broader historical and political-economic context. Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CAST 100, 200, or equivalent
    Community Based Learning
  
  • CAST 339 - Indigenous Activism, Environmental Justice, and the State

    FC SSCI CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course examines the intersectional scope of Indigenous environmental activism within the broader context and histories of Indigenous sovereignty and decolonial movements in North America. We will examine the centrality of environmental activism to Indigenous sovereignty and treaty rights movements and their relationship to corporate capitalist land appropriation and resource extraction, gender and race based violence, and the role of the settler colonial state. The course centers Indigenous frameworks of political resurgence, politics of decolonization, and visions for an ecologically just and emancipatory alternative to the destructive logics of the settler state.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 201 or equivalent or consent of instructor
    This course is cross-listed with ENVS 339


    Sustainability
  
  • CAST 382 - Afro-Asian America: Intraminority Connections in Historical Perspective

    FC SSCI CD WADV
    4 credits
    Seminar guides students in methods of historical research and writing through subject of Afro-Asian relations in America and the world during the 20th century. Through readings and projects, students will develop an understanding of comparative racial formations, connections between Asian American and African American histories, and salience of Black-Asian thought and relations against developments including U.S. civil rights movement, Third World anti-colonialism, and the Los Angeles riots.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prior coursework on race in U.S. history recommended.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 382


  
  • CAST 385 - Indigenous Nations, Treaty Rights, and the Great Lakes

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course examines the environmental history and contemporary environmental issues of the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada in the context of Indigenous treaty rights, nationhood, and ecological knowledge. We will focus on the legal and political contests over land and resources such as water, fish and game, timber, and rice, along with the implications of environmental degradation and climate crisis. The course centers struggles for Indigenous sovereignty as central to understanding the history and contemporary issues surrounding the Great Lakes by tracking contests over treaty rights, tribal economic development, inter-tribal organizing, education and the implementation of traditional ecological knowledge, and environmental activism.
    Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 201 or equivalent or consent of instructor
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is cross-listed with ENVS 385


    Community Based Learning
    Sustainability
  
  • CAST 403 - Queer Trauma Narratives

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course examines narratives of trauma in queer lives through literature, film, media, and performance in conjunction with trauma theory and psychoanalysis. We pay specific attention to questions of community, healing, violence, and affect in order to explore narration, identity, power, and oppression. We interrogate the purposes these narratives serve, whether as healing methods or as cautionary tales that provide cultural insight at the intersections of queerness and race, sex, disability, class, gender, and ethnicity. By adopting the lens of trauma studies in psychology and psychoanalysis, we look critically at the function of trauma in identity and community formation.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CAST 100, GSFS 101, or equivalent.
  
  • CAST 405 - Age of Fracture: The United States since 1973

    FC SSCI WADV
    4 credits
    In this advanced reading seminar, students will study key developments and interpretations in recent U.S. social and cultural history from 1973, with particular attention on the decades from the 1970s to 1990s. Major themes include race relations, gender and sexuality, economic inequality, popular culture, and international relations. Discussions and coursework will emphasize historiographical trends, debates, and directions.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Previous coursework in American history is strongly advised.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 405


  
  • CAST 406 - Gender and Geography: Literatures of Appalachia

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This seminar explores varied experiences of people living in Appalachia by focusing on texts in which this regional location plays a prominent role. Understanding that regional boundaries are fluid and open to interpretation, we will discuss Appalachian novels, essays, poems, memoir, and films that raise questions of: what and where is Appalachia; issues of gender, class, sexuality, and race; stereotypes; and what roles Appalachia plays in relation to the United States as a national entity.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Previous coursework in CAST or GSFS is recommended but not required.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 406


  
  • CAST 408 - Race, Religion and Citizenship

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Scholars in American and Religious Studies have long noted the ways that religion has been central to American social and political transformation. This reading seminar invites students to explore some of most important challenges and transformations in contemporary American life and the ways that race, citizenship and religion are mobilized to frame enduring problems as well as possible solutions. By focusing on issues such as sanctuary movements, prison ministries, immigrant adaptation, and popular cultural representations of racialized religion, this seminar explores the ways religious practices inform social transformations and are constitutitive in racialized citizenship projects.
  
  • CAST 411 - Seminar: Ethnic and Racial Minority Mental Health

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This seminar examines research and theory on the conceptualization, assessment, prevention, and treatment of mental health among ethnic and racial minority populations primarily in the U.S. This course utilizes a systemic approach to conceptualizing mental health concerns, as well as a strengths-based approach to intervention and promotion of mental well-being. Course topics may include (but are not limited to) discrimination, racial trauma, migration, cultural adaptation, and mental health disparities.
    Prerequisites & Notes: (PSYC 100 or COGS 101 or NSCI 201) and PSYC 200 required; 300 recommended, or instructor permission.
    This course is cross-listed with PSYC 411


  
  • CAST 416 - Taste the Nation: Culture, Consumption, and American Identities

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Do your tastes in food, art, and popular culture say something about who you are? In this class, we will draw on philosophy and critical theory in order to discuss the politics of consumption in several different contexts. Along the way, we will analyze works of art, literature, and pop culture that make connections between taste and particular constructions of nationality, sexuality, gender, race, class, and ethnicity. Figures we will encounter in this class include Padma Lakshmi, Pierre Bourdieu, Laura Esquivel, Susan Sontag, and Kerry James Marshall.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Previous coursework in CAST recommended but not required
  
  • CAST 427 - Borderlands

    FC SSCI CD WADV
    4 credits
    The US-Mexico border region is a political, economic, and cultural crossroads. The course investigates interactions between Native Americans and Spanish colonists beginning in the 16th century, emerging United States economic and political control during the 19th century, and immigration, community building, and civil rights movements in the 20th century. We also discuss la frontera as a literary and symbolic concept.
    Prerequisites & Notes: History 270 -Latina/o History is strongly encouraged as preparation for this course
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 427


  
  • CAST 500 - Capstone Research Seminar

    FC SSCI WINT
    4 credits
    Students will spend the semester undertaking original research projects that culminate their CAST major. Projects should incorporate inter- and multidisciplinary methods, utilize a range of primary sources, critically engage secondary material, and thus encapsulate what they have learned about American Studies over their course of study.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CAST 100 or a 2XX level CAST course; CAST 200.
  
  • CAST 501 - Senior Honors

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This seminar provides honors students with the opportunity to discuss the various steps and challenges of conducting independent honors research. Discussions will include methodology, research methods, and progress reports on individual projects. Students will also exchange written work for peer review.
  
  • CAST 502 - Senior Honors

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This seminar provides honors students with the opportunity to discuss the various steps and challenges of conducting independent honors research. Discussions will include methodology, research methods, and progress reports on individual projects. Students will also exchange written work for peer review.
  
  • CAST 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
 

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