Mar 02, 2021  
Course Catalog 2005-2006 
    
Course Catalog 2005-2006 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Oberlin College Courses


 

Biology

  
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    BIOL 215 - Ornithology


    3 NS
    Second Semester. This course will present birds both as a unique group and as representative of vertebrates. The course will emphasize adaptation, ecology, and behavior of birds, and introduce students to methods used in modern ornithology. We also will consider current views of the systematic relationships among living birds, and the evolutionary history of birds, including the debate regarding their origin in relation to dinosaurs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: BIOL 118 or BIOL 120. Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 24.
    Mr. Tarvin

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 216 - Ornithology Laboratory


    1 NS
    Second Semester. Laboratory sessions will meet on alternate Saturday or alternate Sunday mornings (occasionally at night), and emphasize field identification, habitat relationships, migration, and behavior.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: BIOL 215. Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Mr. Tarvin

    Credits: 1 hour
  
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    BIOL 218 - Evolution


    3 NS
    First Semester. Principles of microevolution (selection, gene flow, mutation, genetic drift, and factors that influence population genetic structure), evolutionary ecology (life history strategies, gene-environment interactions), and macroevolution (changes above the species level) will be studied, with emphasis on both the process and pattern of organic evolution.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: BIOL 118, 120. Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 24.
    Mr. Tarvin

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 301 - Developmental Biology


    3 NS, WR
    Second Semester. A survey of the developmental processes at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels in vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and also certain plants and protists. Two 50-minute lectures will explore cell differentiation, pattern formation, and morphogenesis in embryos, presented with an emphasis on evolution. A three-hour demonstration-discussion session per week will complement lecture material with specimens, models and student-led presentations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: BIOL 118/119, and 213 or consent of instructor.
    Enrollment Limit: 15.
    Ms. Cruz

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 302 - Developmental Biology Laboratory


    2 NS
    Second Semester. Experiments and laboratory exercises designed to familiarize students with approaches to the study of embryogenic and developmental processes at the cell, tissue, and organismal levels. Live and preserved animals will be used in class, which will meet for one-half to two hours per week in addition to regularly scheduled class times.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Pre- or corequisite: BIOL 301.
    Enrollment Limit: 15.
    Ms. Cruz

    Credits: 2 hours
  
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    BIOL 304 - Mechanisms of Plant Adaptation


    3 NS
    Second Semester. This course focuses on cellular and molecular mechanisms that affect plants’ ability to succeed in natural and agricultural populations. Topics will include central issues of plant physiology such as control of flowering, and nitrogen use, which have implications for agriculture, as well other issues of ecological significance such as natural defenses against plant pathogens, response to stresses such as cold and salinity, and mechanisms of light perception. Creation of transgenic plants for use in agriculture and research will be discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 213 or consent of the instructor.
    Ms. Laskowski

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 305 - Experiments in Plant Growth and Development


    2 NS
    Second Semester. In this laboratory course, students will learn some of the molecular and genetic techniques currently used in plant research and employ them in independent projects. Working together, we will choose a set of novel projects that can be carried out over the course of the semester. Because we will work with living organisms, and use experimental techniques that do not always fit into three-hour labs, students will be required to work independently for three to four hours per week outside of scheduled lab times to complete their projects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: BIOL 304.
    Enrollment Limit: 8.
    Ms. Laskowski

    Credits: 2 hours
  
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    BIOL 306 - Microbiology (Lecture only)


    3 NS
    Second Semester. The study of microorganisms with an emphasis on prokaryotes. Major areas to be covered include microbial cell structure and function, physiology, metabolism, genetics, diversity, and ecology. Applied aspects of microbiology will also be discussed such as biotechnology, the role of microorganisms in environmental processes, and medical microbiology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: BIOL 213/214 and CHEM 205.
    Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Ms. Romberg

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 307 - Microbiology (Laboratory)


    1 NS
    Second Semester. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate processes central to microbiology and to familiarize students with basic skills required for working with microorganisms. Topics will include asceptic technique, microscopy, and isolation and identification of unknown bacteria.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite. BIOL 306.
    Enrollment Limit: 16.
    Ms. Romberg

    Credits: 1 hour
  
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    BIOL 310 - Genetics


    Second Semester. The study of heredity has evolved into a discipline whose limits are continually expanded by innovative molecular technologies. This course explores the experimental basis for our current understanding of the structures, functions and inheritance of genes. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic genetics with illustrative material from viruses, bacteria, plants, and humans is presented. The laboratory part of the course provides an experimental introduction to classical and modern genetic analysis.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: BIOL 118/119, 120, and 213/214.
    Enrollment Limit: 24.
    Ms. Peters

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    BIOL 312 - Animal Physiology


    4 NS, WR
    First Semester. This course explores the function of the body, from the molecular level (e.g., generation of electrical signals in the nervous system) to the organismal level (e.g., adaptations to pregnancy, exercise, or extreme environments). Classes and laboratories study the physiology of excitable cells (e.g., nerves and muscles), cardiovascular system, lungs and respiratory system, kidneys and renal system, and reproduction. .

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 213 or NSCI 201 or NSCI 204 or consent of instructor.
    Enrollment Limit: 28.
    Mr. Allen

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    BIOL 313 - The Living Cell


    3 NS, WR
    Second Semester. This course explores the vibrant activity of cells, ranging from intracellular shuttling of vesicles and organelles to locomotion of cells during events such as embryogenesis, cancer, or wound healing. To understand how this activity arises, the course studies the design and function of the involved proteins, as well as the signaling pathways orchestrating the activity. Involves each week two class meetings and one small-group discussion.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 213 or NSCI 201 or NSCI 204 or consent of instructor.
    Enrollment Limit: 16.
    Mr. Allen

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 314 - The Living Cell (with Research Project)


    3-4 NS
    Second Semester. This course shares two weekly classes with BIOL 313, but includes a semester-long, small-group research project in place of the small-group discussions. Chosen by students in consultation with instructor, the projects will develop students’ mastery of current cell biological research techniques (e.g., mutagenesis, genetic screens, spectroscopy, or advanced microscopy), as well as skills at designing, performing, and then communicating experiments.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 10.
    Mr. Allen

    Credits: 3 to 4 hours
  
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    BIOL 325 - Principles of Vascular Plant Taxonomy and Systematics


    2 NS, WR
    First Semester First Module. This course constitutes an introduction to plant taxonomy and systematics. Lectures, discussions, and readings will focus on the evolutionary history of vascular plants, mechanisms of speciation, methods for inferring plant phylogeny and taxonomic nomenclature. The laboratories will be devoted primarily to familiarization with the information necessary to identify plants in the field and from preserved specimens.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 118/119, 120 or consent of instructor.
    Enrollment Limit: 24.
    Mr. Benzing

    Credits: 2 hours
  
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    BIOL 326 - Vascular Plant Diversity and Systematics


    2 NS, WR
    Second Semester Second Module. This course deals with the diversity of vascular plants broadly defined. Specific subjects include the adaptive strategies of higher plants, relationships among the major taxa, particularly families within the angiosperm complex, and plants as actors within biological communities and as partners in symbioses. Most of the laboratories will be devoted to field work and familiarization with the local flora in winter condition and early during the growing season.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 118/119, 120 or consent of instructor. BIOL 325 highly recommended.
    Enrollment Limit: 24.
    Mr. Benzing

    Credits: 2 hours
  
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    BIOL 327 - Immunology


    3 NS
    First Semester. A comprehensive introduction to our current understanding of the immune system, including innate, humoral, and cell-mediated components. Emphasis is placed on the molecular and cellular events underlying immunity. Lectures, discussion, and problem sets present the important experimental techniques currently used by immunologists. Discussion of current applications (e.g. vaccination) and challenges (e.g. autoimmune disease) illustrate the link between basic research and clinical immunology and reveal social and political aspects of biomedical research.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 118, 120, and 213. Note: Priority given to juniors and seniors.
    Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Ms. Salter

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 328 - Immunology Research Methods


    1.5 NS
    First Semester. The laboratory introduces students to techniques for detecting the reaction between antigens and antibodies and for isolating and characterizing cells of the immune system. Cell-culturing techniques are taught. Much of the course consists of a semi-independent research project utilizing hybridomas and the monoclonal antibodies they secrete. Most experiments will require one to two hours outside the regularly scheduled laboratory meetings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 213. Note: Priority given to juniors and seniors.
    Enrollment Limit: 8.
    Ms. Salter

    Credits: 1.5 hours
  
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    BIOL 329 - Virology


    3 NS
    Second Semester. An introduction to the basic principles of virology, including the biochemistry, molecular genetics, and genetics of viruses with emphasis on animal viruses. Lectures will examine viruses as important model systems for elucidating the basic principles of molecular biology and also as important agents of disease. Medical topics will include a discussion of the pathogenesis, immunology, and prevention/treatment of important human viral diseases.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: BIOL 118, 120, and 213. Note: Priority given to juniors and seniors.
    Enrollment Limit: 24.
    Ms. Salter

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 333 - Use of Mammalian Cell Culture in Research


    Second Semester. An introduction to the principles and techniques for culturing mammalian cells. The overall goal is to teach practical laboratory skills so that students can function independently in a research lab. Topics include lab safety; adherent and suspension cells; media preparation; contaminant detection; cryopreservation; proliferation assays; and transfection and expression of foreign DNA. Students are expected to work independently for three to four hours per week in addition to the scheduled group meetings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 213/214.
    Enrollment Limit: 8.
    Ms. Salter

    Credits: 2 hours
  
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    BIOL 403 - Seminar: Prokaryotic Cell Biology


    3 NS
    First Semester. Recent research in microbiology has indicated that bacteria have far more complicated life cycles and structural organization than had previously been realized. Principles for achieving this organization are similar to those used by eukaryotic cells, but the detailed mechanisms often differ substantially. Topics covered in this course may include bacterial cell structure, the cell cycle, developmental pathways, response to the enviromnent, motility, and membrane physiology. Methods for studying prokaryotic cell biology and biochemistry will be explored through readings from the primary literature. Lectures will alternate with in-class discussions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 213/214. Consent of instructor required. Preference to juniors and seniors.
    Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Ms. Romberg

    Next offered 2006-2007.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    BIOL 411 - Seminar: Conservation Biology


    3 NS, WR
    Next offered 2006-2007.

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 501 - Research


    1-3 NS
    Projects for original investigation are developed by students in consultation with a faculty member. Students in the Honors Program enroll for both semesters of their senior year. A maximum of three credit hours (four hours for Honors students completing two semesters of research) and one laboratory unit may be earned in this course toward the requirements for a biology major. Research sponsored by Mr. Allen, Mr. Benzing, Ms. Cruz, Ms. Garvin, Ms. Laskowski, Mr. Laushman, Mr. Miller, Ms. Peters, Ms. Romberg, Ms. Salter, Mr. Tarvin, and Ms. Thornton.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 502 - Research


    1-3 NS
    Projects for original investigation are developed by students in consultation with a faculty member. Students in the Honors Program enroll for both semesters of their senior year. A maximum of three credit hours (four hours for Honors students completing two semesters of research) and one laboratory unit may be earned in this course toward the requirements for a biology major. Research sponsored by Mr. Allen, Mr. Benzing, Ms. Cruz, Ms. Garvin, Ms. Laskowski, Mr. Laushman, Mr. Miller, Ms. Peters, Ms. Romberg, Ms. Salter, Mr. Tarvin, and Ms. Thornton.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours
  
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    BIOL 995 - Private Reading


    1-3 NS
    Independent study of a subject arranged by student with member of Biology teaching staff, who supervises the project. Only subjects beyond the range of catalog course offerings permitted. Special approvals required from: project supervisor, student’s academic advisor, and department chair. Note: A student is limited to one private reading course per semester. Private readings sponsored by Mr. Allen, Ms. Bennett, Mr. Benzing, Mr. Braford, Ms. Cruz, Ms. Garvin, Ms. Laskowski, Mr. Laushman, Mr. Miller, Ms. Peters, Ms. Romberg, Ms. Salter, Mr. Tarvin, and Ms. Thornton.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

Chemistry & Biochemistry

  
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    CHEM 50 - Basic Chemistry


    3 NS, QPh
    Second Semester. The course is intended for students without a high-school chemistry background who want an introduction to chemistry. The course is appropriate for students who plan to take CHEM 101 and for students who intend no further study of chemistry. It consists of lectures and demonstrations surveying the fundamental ideas of chemistry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: Not open to students who have credit for CHEM 101 or equivalent.
    Enrollment Limit: 40.
    Staff

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    CHEM 101 - Structure and Reactivity


    4 NS, QPh
    First Semester. Reactions, chemical periodicity, bonding, molecular structure. Mr. Thompsons’s sections are taught in workshop mode, emphasizing problem solving and peer discussion with less time devoted to lecture compared to other sections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: High-school chemistry or consent of instructors; high-school mathematics up to, but not including, pre-calculus. Note: Students must register for both lecture and laboratory.
    Enrollment Limit (Lecture): 40 per section / Enrollment Limit (Lab): 42 per section.
    Mr. Fuchsman, Mr. Thompson, Staff / Mr. Hill, Staff.

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    CHEM 102 - Chemical Principles


    4 NS, QPf
    Second Semester. Equilibrium, thermodynamics, reaction rates and mechanisms, atomic and molecular orbitals.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 101. Note: Students must register for both lecture and laboratory.
    Enrollment Limit (Lecture): 40 and 70 per section. / Enrollment Limit (Lab): 40 per section
    Mr. Belitsky, Ms. Whelan / Mr. Belitsky, Mr. Hill. 

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    CHEM 103 - Topics in General Chemistry


    4 NS, QPf
    First Semester. For students with good pre-college preparation. Reactions, equilibrium, thermodynamics, reaction rates and mechanisms, and bonding. Takes the place of CHEM 101, CHEM 102. Admission by examination during the orientation period. Students who have had chemistry in high school and who plan to take both chemistry and calculus should take the examination. Students who earned a score of 3 or higher on the Chemistry Advanced Placement test automatically qualify for the course. Interested students should write to the departmental secretary early in the summer.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or credit for MATH 133 or equivalent. Consent of instructor required.
    Mr. Ackermann

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    CHEM 145 - Chemistry and Crime


    3 NS
    Second Semester. Principles of evidence collection, physical and chemical forensic tests, and instrumental techniques as applied to criminal investigations. Important criminal cases and societal issues, such as drunk driving and drug testing, with a focus on the science involved. Chemical concepts will be developed as needed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 40.
    Mr. Thompson

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CHEM 151 - Chemistry and the Environment


    3 NS
    Second Semester. A discussion of the natural and human origins of significant chemical species in the environment and the ultimate fate of these materials. Air and water quality will receive special attention. Chemical concepts will be developed as needed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 40.
    Mr. Elrod

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    CHEM 205 - Principles of Organic Chemistry


    4 NS
    First and Second Semester. A one-semester introduction to the basic principles, theories, and applications of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Representative reactions, preparation, and properties of carbon compounds will be covered. The laboratory will provide experience with purification, physical and spectroscopic characterization, and synthesis of organic substances.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 102 or 103. Note: Students must register for both lecture and laboratory.
    Mr. Nee Enrollment Limit (Lecture): 60. Enrollment Limit (Lab): 30 per section. Staff Enrollment Limit (Lecture): 40. Enrollment Limit (Lab): 24 per section.

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    CHEM 211 - Analytical Chemistry


    4 NS, Qpf
    First Semester. Principles of chemical measurements with a focus on instrumental analysis, including spectrophotometry and separations. Laboratory develops quantitative skills and provides experience with chemical instrumentation. Spreadsheets are used to treat experimental data.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    C– or better in MATH 133 and in CHEM 102 or CHEM 103. Note: Students must register for both lecture and laboratory.
    Enrollment Limit: 28 (Lecture); 14 per section (Laboratory).
    Ms. Whelan

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    CHEM 213 - Inorganic Chemistry


    4 NS
    Second Semester. Development of the principles and theories of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, structure and bonding in covalent and ionic compounds, periodic properties, acid-base concepts, coordination compounds, and selected descriptive chemistry of the main group elements. Laboratory involves synthesis and characterization of inorganic substances and activities illustrating principles covered in the lecture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 102 or 103. Note: Students must register for both lecture and laboratory.
    Enrollment Limit (Lecture): 32. Enrollment Limit (Lab): 16 per section.
    Ms. Oertel

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    CHEM 254 - Bioorganic Chemistry


    4 NS
    Second Semester. Organic chemistry of the major classes of biological substances. Emphases on structures and reaction mechanisms as they apply to biological transformations. Includes the chemistry of macromolecules, and coordination chemistry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 205. Note: Students must register for both lecture and laboratory.
    Enrollment Limit (Lecture): 60. Enrollment Limit (Lab): 30 per section.
    Mr. Fuchsman

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    CHEM 325 - Organic Mechanism and Synthesis


    3 NS
    Second Semester. This second course in organic chemistry will systematically explore reactions of carbon-containing compounds and the mechanistic pathways involved in these processes. Reactions and topics that will be discussed include functional group transformations, oxidations, reductions, cycloadditions, stereospecific reactions and carbon-carbon bond formation. Strategies will be presented for the design of multi-step organic syntheses.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 205.
    Mr. Nee 

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    CHEM 326 - Organic Mechanism and Synthesis Laboratory


    1 NS
    Second Semester. The laboratory is intended to complement the Organic Mechanism and Synthesis lecture course. Laboratory involves experiments illustrating principles presented in the lecture course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Pre- or Co-requisite: CHEM 325 or permission of instructor. Note: CR/NE or P/NP grading.
    Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Mr. Nee

    Credits: 1 hour
  
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    CHEM 327 - Synthesis Laboratory


    3 NS
    First Semester. Laboratory work involves the synthesis of organic and inorganic compounds by a variety of techniques (e.g. photochemical, electrochemical, inert atmosphere) and the use of spectroscopic methods (e.g. Fourier-transform NMR, infrared, and ultraviolet) for their characterization. The lectures develop the theory and unified application of spectroscopic analysis to solve structural problems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: C- or better in CHEM 205 and CHEM 213.
    Enrollment Limit: 8.
    Mr. Ackermann

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    CHEM 339 - Quantum Chemistry and Kinetics


    4 NS, QPf
    Second Semester. Kinetics of chemical reactions, quantum theory of atomic and molecular structure, and molecular spectroscopy.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: C- or better in CHEM 102 or CHEM 103; PHYS 111 or PHYS 104 (may be taken concurrently); and in MATH 134. Note: Students must register for both lecture and laboratory.
    Mr. Elrod

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    CHEM 341 - Trace Analysis


    3 NS
    Second Semester. Chemical analysis with a focus on nanoscale volumes and concentrations. Electrochemistry, laser spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry as applied to environmental and clinical samples. Lecture/discussion format.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 211.
    Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Mr. Thompson

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    CHEM 343 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry


    2 NS
    Second Semester. Topics that will be covered include an introduction to group theory with applications to structure and bonding in inorganic compounds and solids and to the electronic spectra of coordination compounds; kinetics and mechanism of the reactions of coordination complexes; organometallic chemistry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: C- or better in CHEM 213 and 339.
    Mr. Ackermann

    Next offered 2006-2007.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
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    CHEM 349 - Chemical and Statistical Thermodynamics


    3 NS, QPf
    First Semester. Thermodynamics, introduction to statistical thermodynamics, and kinetic theory. Application of mathematical methods and physical principles to chemistry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: C- or better in CHEM 102 or CHEM 103, PHYS 111 or PHYS 104 and in MATH 134.
    Staff

    Credits: 3 hours
  
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    CHEM 361 - Topics in Analytical Chemistry


    2NS
    Second Semester. Recent developments in bioanalytical chemistry will be examined. Readings will be drawn from the chemical literature. Topics include biosensors (and other methods using molecular recognition), proteomics, and in vivo analysis. Class time will be divided between lecture and discussion/student presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: C– or better in CHEM 211.
    Ms. Whelan

    Credits: 2 hours
  
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    CHEM 374 - Biochemistry


    4 NS
    First Semester. Rigorous examination of the chemical basis of enzyme catalysis, metabolism and metabolic control, and aspects of molecular biology. General principles, specific detailed examples, and phylogenetic comparisons.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: C- or better in CHEM 254, in BIOL 213 and in BIOL 214. Note: Students must register for both lecture and laboratory.
    Enrollment Limit: 36.
    Mr. Belitsky

    Credits: 4 hours
  
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    CHEM 396 - Chemical Information


    1 NS
    First Semester. First Module. Finding chemical information with printed and electronic indexes and reference materials. Online searching of Chemical Abstracts. Assessing the information obtained. Presenting chemical information using equation-editing and chemical-structure software.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: C- or better in CHEM 205 and in one other core chemistry course. Notes: Junior majors are encouraged to enroll. CR/NE or P/NP grading.
    Enrollment Limit: 20.
    Mr. Thompson, Ms. Ricker

    Credits: 1 hour
  
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    CHEM 405 - Topics in Organic Chemistry


    2 NS
    First Semester. This course will examine several areas of current research activity in organic chemistry. The course readings will be taken from the recent literature. Topics will include asymmetric synthesis, combinatorial chemistry, molecular recognition, biomimetic chemistry and reactive intermediates. Classes will be equally divided between lecture and discussion/student presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 325, CHEM 339 or consent of instructor.
    Staff

    Credits: 2 hours
  
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    CHEM 409 - Topics in Physical Chemistry


    2 NS, QPf
    First Semester. Physical chemistry of the atmosphere will be explored using thermodynamic, kinetic and quantum chemistry modeling techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: C– or better in CHEM 339 or consent of instructor.
    Mr. Elrod

    Credits: 2 hours
  
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    CHEM 525 - Research


    1-5 NS
    First Semester. Projects for original investigation are assigned. Interested students are encouraged to speak with faculty members about possible projects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: Students in the Honors program are required to enroll.
    Consent of chair required.

    Credits: 1 to 5 hours
  
  •  

    CHEM 526 - Research


    1-5 NS
    Second Semester. Projects for original investigation are assigned. Interested students are encouraged to speak with faculty members about possible projects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: Students in the Honors program are required to enroll.
    Consent of chair required.

    Credits: 1 to 5 hours
  
  •  

    CHEM 995 - Private Reading


    1-3 NS
    Private readings can be undertaken on a wide range of chemistry topics. Advanced courses not offered in the current academic year may be taken as a private reading and count towards the advanced course requirement of a chemistry major. Please consult with the chair about taking advanced courses as a private reading. Private Readings sponsored by Mr. Ackermann, Mr. Elrod, Mr. Fuchsman, Mr. Nee, Ms. Oertel, Mr. Thompson, and Ms. Whelan.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

Chinese

  
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    CHIN 101 - Elementary Chinese


    5 HU, CD
    First Semester. First-year Chinese. Pronunciation and grammar of modern standard Chinese and an introduction to the writing system. Within the first year of study, students will be introduced to approximately 500 characters and the reading of simple texts in the vernacular style.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite for CHIN 102: CHIN 101 or consent of instructor.
    Enrollment Limit: 20.
    Ms. Deppman, Ms. Liu, Ms. Ma

    Credits: 5 hours
  
  •  

    CHIN 102 - Elementary Chinese


    5 HU, CD
    Second Semester. First-year Chinese. Pronunciation and grammar of modern standard Chinese and an introduction to the writing system. Within the first year of study, students will be introduced to approximately 500 characters and the reading of simple texts in the vernacular style.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite for CHIN 102: CHIN 101 or consent of instructor.
    Enrollment Limit: 20.
    Ms.Deppman, Ms. Liu, Ms. Ma

    Credits: 5 hours
  
  •  

    CHIN 106 - Topics in Chinese Literature


    3 HU, CD
    Second Semester. This course is an introduction to modern Chinese fiction. As we read, we will take into account the political controversies over the notion of Chinese sovereignty and will divide the readings into three major geographical categories: China, Taiwan, and Overseas. While this division calls attention to different cultural movements in each region and raises questions specific to each work, it also encourages us to compare the diverse social structures within which these texts are produced. For complete topics and description see the online supplement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: May be repeated for credit.
    Enrollment Limit: 30.
    Ms. Deppman

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CHIN 109 - Topics in Chinese Film


    3 HU, CD
    First Semester. A study of the booming contemporary cinema scenes in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. We will develop a contextualized critical vocabulary for film analysis, examine the history of popular Chinese cinema, and study the relationship between style and politics. Directors may include Zhang Yimou, Chen Kaige, Wong Kar-wai, Stanley Kwan, Ang Lee, Hou Hsiao-hsien, and Tsai Ming-liang. For complete topics and description  see the online supplement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: May be repeated for credit.
    Enrollment Limit: 30.
    Ms. Deppman

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CHIN 120 - Chinese Calligraphy


    2 HU, CD
    First Semester. This course is an introduction to Chinese calligraphy, focusing on the mastery of the standard script kaishu. It will also cover the historical development and aesthetics of Chinese calligraphy.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: Some knowledge of Chinese characters. Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 15.
    Mr. Li

    Next offered 2006-2007.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
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    CHIN 201 - Intermediate Chinese


    5 HU, CD
    First Semester. Second-year Chinese. Development of skills in the vernacular language through oral recitation and reading of texts, with drills on special features of grammar and emphasis on vocabulary in the vernacular idiom. Students will be introduced to approximately 600 additional characters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite for CHIN 201: CHIN 102 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite for CHIN 202: CHIN 201 or consent of instructor.
    Mr. Li, Ms. Liu

    Credits: 5 hours
  
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    CHIN 202 - Intermediate Chinese


    5 HU, CD
    Second Semester. Second-year Chinese. Development of skills in the vernacular language through oral recitation and reading of texts, with drills on special features of grammar and emphasis on vocabulary in the vernacular idiom. Students will be introduced to approximately 600 additional characters.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite for CHIN 201: CHIN 102 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite for CHIN 202: CHIN 201 or consent of instructor.
    Mr. Li, Ms. Liu

    Credits: 5 hours
  
  •  

    CHIN 301 - Advanced Chinese


    3 HU, CD
    First Semester. Third-year Chinese. This course aims to develop skills in reading, aural comprehension, speech, and writing. Vocabulary expansion and control of grammatical patterns are emphasized. Materials to be used include movies and screenplays, newspapers, and readings in expository prose. Conducted in Chinese.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite for CHIN 301: CHIN 202 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite for CHIN 302: CHIN 301 or consent of instructor.
    Mr. Li

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CHIN 302 - Advanced Chinese


    3 HU, CD
    Second Semester. Third-year Chinese. This course aims to develop skills in reading, aural comprehension, speech, and writing. Vocabulary expansion and control of grammatical patterns are emphasized. Materials to be used include movies and screenplays, newspapers, and readings in expository prose. Conducted in Chinese.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite for CHIN 301: CHIN 202 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite for CHIN 302: CHIN 301 or consent of instructor.
    Mr. Li

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CHIN 305 - Introduction to Literary Chinese


    3 HU, CD
    Second Semester. An introduction to literary Chinese through readings selected from basic classical sources in philosophy, history, and literature.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.
    Mr. Li

    Next offered 2006-2007.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  •  

    CHIN 401 - Seminar in Chinese Literature


    3 HU, CD
    First Semester. Fourth-year Chinese. Readings from contemporary Chinese literature, discussions, and writing assignments will further develop advanced skills in Chinese. Conducted in Chinese.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 302 or consent of instructor.
    Mr. Li

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CHIN 402 - Readings in Society, History and Contemporary Events


    3 HU, CD
    Second Semester. Fourth-year Chinese. Advanced skills in reading, writing, speaking, and aural comprehension will be developed in this course through readings in expository prose, discussions, and writing assignments. Conducted in Chinese.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 401 or consent of instructor.
    Ms. Ma

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CHIN 500 - Capstone Project


    Credits: 0 hours
  
  •  

    CHIN 995 - Private Reading


    1-3 HU, CD
    Independent study of a Chinese subject beyond the range of catalog course offerings.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

Cinema Studies

  
  •  

    CINE 101 - Form, Style, and Meaning in Cinema


    4 HU
    First and Second Semester. This course considers the cinema as a particular media form and explores issues and methods in cinema studies. The class focuses on questions of film form and style (narrative, editing, sound, framing, mise-en-scène) and introduces students to concepts in film history and theory (industry, auteurism, spectatorship, the star system, ideology, genre). Students develop a basic critical vocabulary for examining the cinema as an art form, an industry, and a system of culturally meaningful representation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: For complete prerequisites, please refer to the Cinema Studies Program section titled “For Introductory Courses to the Study of Cinema”.
    Enrollment Limit: 60.
    Mr. Pingree

    Credits: 4 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 242 - Masters of World Cinema: Focus on Bergman


    2HU

    Second Semester. First Module. A selected viewing and close analysis of Ingmar Bergman’s most acclaimed films from his earlier comedies to his epic Fanny and Alexander. The evolution of Bergman’s central thematic concerns and the development of his distinctive cinematic style is traced out in Smiles of a Summer Night, The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, The Silence, Persona, and Fanny and Alexander.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 40.
    Mr. Goulding

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  •  

    CINE 243 - Masters of World Cinema: Focus on Polanski


    2HU
    Second Semester. Second Module. A focused discussion and critical analysis of Polanski’s most significant films from his earliest works in his native Poland, his British, Hollywood, and French periods, to his recent award-winning international co-productions Death and the Maiden and The Pianist. Emphasis will be placed on continuities and discontinuities of artistic influences, thematic treatment, sociocultural content, and aesthetic form and imagery as Polanski moved from the political East to the political West and from one film culture to another.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 40.
    Mr. Goulding

    Credits: 2 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 250 - French Cinematic Experience


    3HU, CD
    First Semester. This course will provide a historical survey of French cinema, starting with Méliès and the Lumière Brothers, and working through 1930s Poetic Realism, the Occupation, the New Wave, the 1990s, and the beginning of the digital age. Historical contextualization will be balanced with close film analysis and studies of cinematic technique and structure. We will also discuss cinema’s relationship to the other arts (literature, photography, theatre, and painting). This course is cross-referenced with FREN 250.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 30.
    Ms. An

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 272 - American Cinema: The Possibilities of Art in the Entertainment Business


    4 HU, WR
    Second Semester. This course will focus on how American cinema functions as an entertainment industry and the ways in which the demands of business and changes in technology have shaped it. At the same time, we will explore American movies as works of art produced in a tradition of strong genres and the star system, and efforts of filmmakers to use these for individualized expression. The course will focus particularly on two great eras of American cinema, 1939-1942 and 1966-73. American, Post-1900. F, AL. This course is cross-referenced with ENGL 272.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 30.
    Mr. Day

    Credits: 4 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 320 - Documentary Production


    4 HU, WR
    First and Second Semester. This course explores documentary structure in critical and creative ways. Students examine different ways to think about and understand documentaries (in terms of form, purpose, audience, etc.) and practice basic documentary production (camera, lighting, sound, non-linear editing). After engaging in various individual and small group exercises, students spend the balance of the semester working together to produce short documentary videos. This course is cross-referenced with ENGL 320.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent by instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Mr. Pingree

    Credits: 4 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 333 - Special Topics in English Translation: The Deviant Body in German Literature and Film


    3HU, CD, WR
    First Semester. This course examines fictional representations of the human body in order to study changing concepts of normalcy and difference. Discussions will cover German prose, drama, and film (subtitled) from the mid-19th century to the present, including works by Büchner, Kafka, Dürrenmatt, Herzog, Duden, and Jelinek. Lectures and discussions in English. Readings may be done either in English or the German original. This course is cross-referenced with GERM 333.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 30.
    Ms. Hamilton

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 350 - Framing French Non-Fiction Film


    3HU, CD, WR
    Second Semester. This course addresses “documentary” and “ethnographic” trajectories in French cinema, from the invention of the Lumière cinématographe in 1896 to digital filmmaking at the beginning of the 21 st century. We will investigate the structures, techniques, and ideologies that identify these practices as non-fictional, and eventually uncover their poeticity and artifice, particularly in narrative films which play with these forms and test the limits of their claims to truth. Filmmakers to be studied will include Vigo, Grémillon, Ophuls, Rouch, Resnais, Marker, and Varda. This course is cross-referenced with FREN 350.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Ms. An

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 368 - Movies and Melodrama


    4HU, WR
    First Semester. This course explores the history, cultural contexts, and critical challenges of melodramatic narrative cinema. We’ll study the genre’s origins, the rise and fall of its prestige, its identification as a “feminine” form, its adaptation to different historical and cultural contexts, and its contemporary challenges to cultural analysis. American, Post-1900. This course is cross-referenced with ENGL 368.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Mr. Pence

    Credits: 4 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 373 - American Culture and Literature in the 1930s


    4 HU, WR
    Second Semester. This course focuses on American culture in the 1930s with particular reference to the relation between the novel and cinema, though other arts and media such as photography, painting, and music will also be addressed. We will consider not only the relation of these arts to each other but to the social crisis of the Great Depression. American, Post-1900. This course is cross-referenced with ENGL 373.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Mr. Day

    Credits: 4 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 376 - Screening Spirituality


    4HU, WR
    Second Semester. Cinema is perennially concerned with the challenge of representing extraordinary experiences. Filmmakers and critics return repeatedly to the medium’s capacity to evoke a profound sense of reality despite reason’s doubts regarding the status of the represented world. We’ll investigate selected treatments of the extraordinary and the challenges they present to critical theory and practice. American, Post-1900. This course is cross-referenced with ENGL 376.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Mr. Pence

    Credits: 4 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 433 - Special Topics: Imagining History in Film


    4HU, WR
    First Semester. This course will explore the ways history and our relation to it are defined and represented in film, in short, how history is imagined. The emphasis will be primarily, but not exclusively, on American cinema. We will be equally concerned with what films do with history and what focusing on the subject of history reveals about film as art. American, Post-1900. This course is cross-reference with ENGL 433.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 12.
    Mr. Day

    Credits: 4 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 498 - Senior Tutorial


    1-4 HU,WR
    First and Second Semester. Students should consult with the Director of the Program about arranging a Senior Tutorial.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission based on a completed application form (available in Program office). Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 9.
    Ms. An, Mr. Day, Ms. Hamilton, Mr. Pence, Mr. Pingree

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 499 - Honors Project


    1-4 HU, WR
    First and Second Semester. Students interested in pursuing Honors should consult with the Director of the Program.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission based on a completed application form (available in Program office). Consent of instructor required.
    Ms. An, Mr. Day, Ms. Hamilton, Mr. Pence, Mr. Pingree

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours
  
  •  

    CINE 995 - Private Reading


    0.5-3 HU
    First and Second Semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.
    Staff

    Credits: .5 to 3 hours

Classics

  
  •  

    CLAS 101 - Homer’s Iliad and the Myths of Tragedy


    3 HU, WR
    First Semester. Critical study of Homer’s Iliad, the First example of the tragic perspective in western literature, selected tragic dramas by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, and Shakespeare, and some modern films. Attention to how the view of human experience established in these works serves to reflect and comment upon recurring themes in western civilization. (Open to those who have taken Classics 100 or 206, but not both.) Lecture and discussion.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 60.
    Mr. Van Nortwick

    Next offered 2006-2007.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  •  

    CLAS 102 - Homer’s Odyssey and the Myths of Comedy


    3 HU, WR
    First Semester. Critical study of Homer’s Odyssey, the first example of the comic perspective in western literature, selected comic dramas by Euripides, Aristophanes, Plautus, Terence, and Shakespeare, and some modern films. Attention to how the view of human experience established in these works serves to reflect and comment upon recurring themes in western civilization. Lecture and discussion.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: Open to those who have taken CLAS 100 or 206, but not both.
    Enrollment Limit: 60.
    Mr. Van Nortwick

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CLAS 103 - History of Greece


    3 SS
    First Semester. An introduction to Greek history, from the prehistoric period to the rise of Rome. Special emphasis will be given to the study of the ancient sources, especially Herodotus and Thucydides, as we attempt to reconstruct the political, social, and constitutional history of this tremendously vital period. Offered in alternate years.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: May count toward a history major.
    Enrollment Limit: 55.
    Staff

    Next offered 2006-2007.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  •  

    CLAS 104 - History of Rome


    3 SS
    First Semester. This course will provide a survey of the history of Rome, from its prehistoric origins to its “decline and fall” in the fifth century A.D. Attention will be given to the evolution of Roman social and political structures, Roman imperialism, and the transition from paganism to Christianity. Readings from the ancient sources will provide the basis for discussions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note: May count toward a History major.
    Enrollment Limit: 55.
    Staff

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CLAS 209 - The Ancient and Modern Novel


    3 HU
    Second Semester. This course will take as its point of departure the surviving novels of Greek and Roman antiquity. We will read a selection of Greek novels, as well as Petronius’ Satyricon and Apuleius’ Metamorphoses. To these ancient works we will compare a series of modern novels, especially Epitaph of a Small Winner by Machado de Assis and Kennedy’s Confederacy of Dunces. The course will also pursue critical and theoretical issues regarding the genre of the novel raised by Bakhtin, Lukacs,Winkler, and others. All works will be read in translation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Next offered 2006-2007.

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CLAS 210 - Greek and Roman Mythology


    3HU
    Second Semester. Introduction to the major myths of ancient Greece and Rome and their adaptation by later Western culture. Study of the idea and function of myth, with introductions to some of the most important schools of mythological analysis: psychoanalysis, structuralism, and semiotics. Some attention to the representation of classical myth in the visual arts, especially in the collection of the Allen Art Museum.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Mr. Ormand

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CLAS 219 - Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome


    3 HU, WR
    Next offered 2006-2007.

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    CLAS 304 - Sophoclean Tragedy


    3 HU, WR
    Second Semester. In-depth study, in translation, of the seven surviving tragedies of Sophocles. Careful consideration of these plays as individual realizations, in the context of Fifth-Century Athenian culture, of Greek heroic ideals. Close reading of primary texts as well as Secondary critical and theoretical studies. Discussion and occasional student reports.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CLAS 206 or CLAS 101. Consent of instructor required.
    Enrollment Limit: 20.
    Mr. Van Nortwick

    Next offered 2006-2007. 

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  •  

    CLAS 501 - Senior Project


    2-3 HU
    Intensive work on a topic selected in consultation with a member of the department, culminating in a presentation of a paper or other project.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: Senior major standing and invitation of the department. Consent of instructor required.

    Credits: 2 to 3 hours
  
  •  

    CLAS 995 - Private Reading


    1-3HU

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours
  
  •  

    GREK 101 - Elementary Greek


    4 HU, CD
    First Semester. The essentials of the classical Greek language, with emphasis on reading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Mr. Ormand

    Credits: 4 hours
  
  •  

    GREK 102 - Elementary Greek II


    4 HU, CD
    Second Semester. Continuation of Elementary Greek, completing the study of basic Greek grammar and syntax. We will read selections from Plato’s Apology in the second half of the semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: GREK 101 or equivalent.
    Mr. Ormand

    Credits: 4 hours
  
  •  

    GREK 201 - Homer’s Iliad


    3 HU, CD
    First Semester. Reading and translation of selections from Homer’s Iliad, with discussion of relevant critical issues and historical background.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: GREK 102 or equivalent.
    Mr. Van Nortwick

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    GREK 202 - Herodotus


    3 HU, CD
    Second Semester. Readings and discussion of selections from Herodotus’ Histories in Greek, supplemented by readings from the critical literature.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: GREK 201 or equivalent.
    Mr. Lee

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    GREK 202 - Introduction to Greek Tragedy


    3 HU, CD
    Second Semester. Reading, translation, and discussion of Euripides’ Hippolytus, supplemented by readings from the critical literature and of other tragedies in translation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: GREK 201 or consent of instructor.
    Mr. Lee

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    GREK 304 - Greek Lyric Poetry


    3 HU, CD
    First Semester. Reading of the major Greek Lyric poets, including Archilochus, Anacreon, Bacchylides, Simonides, and Solon. Particular attention to the works of Sappho, in their literary and social context. We will study the development of a lyric genre or genres, with attention to erotic, political, and satiric themes. Secondary readings on individual authors and their influence.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: GREK 202 or equivalent.
    Mr. Ormand

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    GREK 305 - Sophocles


    3 HU, CD
    Second Semester. Readings, discussion, and papers on the tragedy of Sophocles. Close analysis of Oedipus Tyrannus and a survey of the criticism and scholarship dealing with Sophocles.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: GREK 202 or the equivalent.
    Mr. Van Nortwick

    Credits: 3 hours
  
  •  

    GREK 306 - Homer’s Odyssey


    3 HU, CD
    Second semester. Careful reading of selections from the Odyssey, with a survey of the criticism and scholarship on the poem. Special attention to issues of heroism and gender.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: GREK 202 or the equivalent.
    Mr. Van Nortwick

    Next offered 2006-2007. 

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  •  

    GREK 501 - Senior Honors


    3-6 HU
    Intensive work on a topic selected in consultation with a member of the department, culminating in a presentation of a paper or other project.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: Senior major standing and invitation of the department. Consent of instructor required.

    Credits: 3 to 6
  
  •  

    GREK 502 - Senior Honors


    3-6 HU
    Intensive work on a topic selected in consultation with a member of the department, culminating in a presentation of a paper or other project.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: Senior major standing and invitation of the department. Consent of instructor required.

    Credits: 3 to 6 hours
  
  •  

    GREK 995 - Private Reading


    1-3 HU

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of instructor required.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours
  
  •  

    LATN 101 - Elementary Latin


    4 HU, CD
    First Semester. The essentials of the Latin language, with emphasis on reading. This course is intended for students with no previous training in Latin.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Enrollment Limit: 25.
    Mr. Lee

    Credits: 4 hours
 

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