Jul 18, 2024  
Course Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Course Catalog 2022-2023 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Search


This is a comprehensive listing of all active, credit-bearing courses offered by Oberlin College and Conservatory since Fall 2016. Courses listed this online catalog may not be offered every semester; for up to date information on which courses are offered in a given semester, please see PRESTO. 

For the most part, courses offered by departments are offered within the principal division of the department. Many interdisciplinary departments and programs also offer courses within more than one division.

Individual courses may be counted simultaneously toward more than one General Course Requirement providing they carry the appropriate divisional attributes and/or designations.

 

Religion

  
  • RELG 283 - American Religious Traditions

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The relationship between ‘religion’ and ‘America’ has long been subject to political, religious, and scholarly debate. This course will enter into this discussion, exploring diverse activities, attitudes, and communities understood to be religious and their varied relationships to the material and political conditions of what is now the United States. Topics will include the religious roots of and religious reactions to colonialism, imperialism, racism, capitalism, the Cold War, and the Internet age.
  
  • RELG 306 - Biblical Biographies Told and Retold

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course will trace the midrashic and intertextual development of the biographies of three pairs of biblical men and women as their stories are translated, expanded and retold.  We will first examine the primordial pair, Adam and Eve. We will then study the matriarch Rebekah and her less-favored son, Esau. Finally, we will read the unfolding biographies of the Moabite Ruth and her royal great grandson, King David. The textual traditions include the Masoretic Hebrew text, the Greek Septuagint, the Aramaic targums, the Pseudepigrapha, rabbinic midrash, and the New Testament. All readings will be in English translation.
    This course is cross-listed with JWST 306


  
  • RELG 330 - Religion, Gender, and Sexuality in India

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    How do religious ideologies influence social behaviors and norms related to gender and sexuality? And how are these norms lived out, reinforced, and subverted? This course considers how Hindu and Jain traditions negotiate the complex relationship between religion, gender, and sexuality. Topics may include: kinship and family; pregnancy and childbirth; goddess traditions; asceticism; transgender identities; masculinities; somatic nationalism; and eroticism in literary and performance traditions. Students will explore each topic through engagement with diverse primary and secondary sources, including autobiographies, oral histories, ethnographies, films, religious narratives, and theatrical performances.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 330


  
  • RELG 335 - Buddhism, Healing, and the Body in East Asia

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    The links between Buddhism and healing are as old as the religion itself, and proved especially pivotal in the transmission of the religion to East Asia. How have Buddhists historically imagined the body, disease, and healing? How was this therapeutic imagination in turn shaped by morality, monasticism, ritual practice, and demonology? This course brings these questions to an examination of the rich history of Buddhist healing. Throughout, we also emphasize the intersections of Buddhist healing with other traditions known and practiced in China, Korea, and Japan, including Ayurveda, Daoism, and varieties of classical and popular medicine.
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 335


  
  • RELG 336 - Embodied Mysticism and Negative Theology

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This seminar will focus on two prominent and intertwined strains: the embodied mysticism particularly associated with medieval women and apophatic or negative theology. Negative theology seeks to strip away conceptions and to dismantle language until one is left surrounded by the darkness. No one thing defines medieval female mysticism, but commonalities and distinctive features include eucharistic devotion and bodily mysticism. We will investigate the practice of finding mystical ecstasy through corporeal reality, the medieval association of women with bodies, the political and religious authority granted some female mystics, and the censure or burning of others.
  
  • RELG 340 - Seminar in Ethical Issues in Death and Dying

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    Seminar in Ethical Issues in Death and Dying
  
  • RELG 347 - Seminar: Virtue, Religion, and the Good Life

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    What does it mean to live the virtuous or good life? Are there advantages to focusing on character and virtue rather than on rights, duties, or consequences? What is the relevance of virtue language for contemporary moral and political philosophy? We explore these and other questions as we compare classical and contemporary statements from ancient China, Christianity, and the Greeks, among others, that address issues of human nature, ethics, and tradition. /p>
  
  • RELG 348 - Comparative Religious Ethics

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This seminar focuses on the recent development of comparative religious ethics as a field, first surveying influential books and essays of the past 30 years, and then examining a number of recent works, including several that examine political theory comparatively. Comparative religious ethics makes ethical diversity central to its analysis, which typically begins with description and interpretation of particular accounts of morality. Comparing different instances of such ethics requires searching reflection on the methods and tools of inquiry.
  
  • RELG 358 - Religious Outsiders and the American State

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course explores the relationship between select outsider religions Native Americans, Jews, Catholics, Muslims, Mormons, and Buddhists, and the American state from the beginnings of the United States until the present day. In a country that is premised on the separation of church and state but that also includes diverse religious communities, the place of religion in public life and of the government’s role in regulating and defining religion have long been contested. What do church-state relations look like if we focus on groups outside of the Protestant mainstream? What are the scope and limits of ‘religious freedom’?
    This course is cross-listed with JWST 358


  
  • RELG 390 - Forgiveness in the Islamic and Christian Traditions

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course examines forgiveness within the Christian and Islamic traditions. Our aim is to attend to each tradition in detail before engaging in comparison. Topics discussed from the Christian tradition include biblical literature, theological interpretations, and spiritual practices linked to forgiveness (Rosary of the Holy Wounds, penance). Topics discussed from the Islamic tradition include the Quranic and Hadith literatures, Islamic theology and ethics, and texts of supplication used in the Muslim piety rituals.
  
  • RELG 401 - Capstone Research Methods

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    A guided research, writing, and editing seminar, this course is designed for senior religion majors and humanities majors with research interests that intersect with religion. The course develops student research and writing skills in the academic study of religion and the broader humanities. Students work with the course instructor, an area consultant from their home department, and in a group peer-review process to research, write, edit, and present a 22-30- page capstone project. Students may choose to develop their capstone into a more refined culminating product by continuing their work in RELG 402, offered during the spring semester.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Students must have completed at least one 200-Level course in two of the three general approaches to the study of religion. Students are strongly encouraged to have completed an advanced 300-Level seminar before taking RELG 401.
  
  • RELG 402 - Capstone Colloquium

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    In this team-taught advanced course, students work in a colloquium setting to discuss the research process and produce an independent capstone project. Only students who have completed the RELG 401/ RELG 402 sequence may be considered for Honors.
    Prerequisites & Notes: RELG 401
  
  • RELG 405 - Capstone Seminar in Religious Studies

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    As an alternative to RELG 401/402, this capstone-experience course enables seniors to reflect upon, and apply in a wide variety of settings, what they have learned about the academic study of religion in light of their own coursework in the major. The seminar includes short papers, workshops and oral presentations.
  
  • RELG 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • RELG 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Russian

  
  • RUSS 005 - Russian Phonetics

    HC ARHU CD
    2 credits
    Open to students of Russian at all levels (elementary, intermediate, advanced). An opportunity to focus on and fine-tune phonetics and intonation without having to worry about grammar, vocabulary, etc. Targeted practice of specific sounds, sound combinations, words, phrases etc. through tongue twisters, proverbs, poems, songs, and simple dialogs. By the end of this modular course students should be well on their way to developing correct, near-native Russian pronunciation. Involves a final oral project. Note that this course is only offered on an occasional basis (not annually).
    Prerequisites & Notes: RUSS 101 or the equivalent
  
  • RUSS 007 - Navigating Russia: Practical Strategies for Living and Studying Abroad

    HC ARHU CD
    2 credits
    Americans go abroad with a set of assumptions about Russia, but have little real sense of how Russians live, think, and communicate on a day-to-day basis: they see only the tip of the cultural ‘iceberg.’ This course provides a practical guide to navigating Russia?and avoiding unnecessary collisions?by exploring ‘submerged’ and overlooked aspects of Russian life: nonverbal communication patterns, unspoken norms about food, health, individualism, friendship, loyalty, etc. We will analyze a range of challenging communicative situations so students can develop their own strategies and survival techniques for living in Russia. Open to students at all levels. In English.
  
  • RUSS 101 - Elementary Russian

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    An introduction to contemporary Russian, providing students with basic cultural literacy and an active command of the fundamentals of the language: speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. We employ a wide variety of authentic materials (literary and web-based texts, videos, movies, cartoons, music) as a window onto the vibrant reality of modern Russia. Regular language lab work.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • RUSS 102 - Elementary Russian

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    An introduction to contemporary Russian, providing students with the basic cultural literacy and an active command of the fundamentals of the language: speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. We employ a wide variety of authentic materials (literary and web-based texts, videos, movies, cartoons, music) as a window onto the vibrant reality of modern Russia. Regular language lab work.
    Prerequisites & Notes: RUSS 101 or equivalent is prerequisite for RUSS 102. Note: Students who cannot begin Elementary Russian in the fall may place into RUSS 102 by successfully completing Winter Term Intensive Russian.
  
  • RUSS 170 - Beekeeping: A Cultural and Environmental History

    HC ARHU CD
    2 credits
    Humans have “kept” honeybees for millennia, but have never fully tamed them. This modular course explores our complex relationship with this fascinating semi-domesticated species from a global perspective (Eurasia, Africa, the Middle East, the Americas), with particular emphasis on Russia and the Slavic world, which has an extraordinarily rich beekeeping tradition. Topics include: basic bee biology; wild bees; bee lining; traditional beekeeping, including tree hives, skeps, log hives (we’ll build one!); the development of the movable-frame hives and the rise of industrial apiculture; colony collapse disorder and climate change; new approaches to natural or “bee-centric” beekeeping. Some weekend field trips/activities.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is cross-listed with ENVS 170


    This course is appropriate for new students.
    Sustainability
  
  • RUSS 203 - Intermediate Russian

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Review and refinement of the essentials of grammar and vocabulary, and continued development of reading, aural/oral skills, and writing through a variety of authentic sources that further expand cultural competence. The course content focuses on everyday life topics such as the family, personality traits, clothes, health, and food. Entails a 4th hr. of conversational instruction with a TA, time to be arranged.
    Prerequisites & Notes: RUSS 102 or equivalent.
  
  • RUSS 204 - Intermediate Russian

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Review and refinement of the essentials of grammar and vocabulary, and continued development of reading, aural/oral skills, and writing through a variety of authentic sources that further expand cultural competence. The course content focuses on everyday life topics such as housing, travel, education, work, and holidays. Entails a 4th hr. of conversational instruction with a TA, time to be arranged.
    Prerequisites & Notes: RUSS 203 or equivalent.
  
  • RUSS 221 - Love in a Cold Climate: Literature and Desire in Nineteenth-Century Russia

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Newly westernized and neuroticized, educated Russians in the nineteenth century agonized in unusually creative ways over the nature of love and desire, gender roles and the position of women in society, marriage, sex, family life, adultery, etc. This course examines how these concerns were played out in rich and sometimes steamy detail in nineteenth-century Russian literature. Readings include poetry, novels (notably Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina), novellas, stories, memoirs, and letters by both women and men. Discussion format, short lectures. Taught in English.
  
  • RUSS 222 - Russian Foodways

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    “Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are,” Brillat-Savarin pronounced in 1826. This course examines the vital role of food and drink in Russia and its borderlands (Georgia, Armenia, Ukraine, Central Asia) from a historical, cultural, environmental, and culinary perspective. Topics include: the dual peasant and aristocratic (French) origins of Russian cuisine; food, drinking and national identity; food and memory; vegetarianism; foraging and hunting; feasts and famines; Russia’s kitchen- and dacha- gardening traditions; current trends (fast food, local food, farm-to- table). Sources include cookbooks, literary works, essays, films. Entails substantial kitchen time. No cooking experience required
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • RUSS 225 - The Existentialist Imagination in Russia and Europe

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Responding to the major crises and anxieties of modernity, particularly the decline of religion and the rise of metaphysical skepticism, existentialism invites us to explore such themes as consciousness, death, the absurd, freedom, and responsibility. This course will examine the origins of the existentialist worldview in 19th and early 20th-century Russian literature (Dostoevsky, Tolstoy); discuss the classical texts of European existentialists (Kafka, Unamuno, Camus, Sartre, de Beauvoir) and look at the existentialist legacy in 20th and 21st-century Russian literature and film (Tarkovsky, Shalamov, Petrushevskaya, Litvinova).  Readings, film subtitles, and discussion in English.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 225


  
  • RUSS 240 - Wild Russia

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Russia is still by many measures a wild place. Poised ambiguously between Europe and Asia, it boasts vast swaths of relatively untouched wilderness. It also has a unique and deeply layered tradition of engaging, depicting, and thinking about the natural world. Drawing on texts ranging from Turgenevs Notes of a Hunter to Pelevins The Werewolf Problem in Central Russia and Svetlana Alexievich Voices from Chernobyl, as well as films such as Tarkovskys Stalker, the course explores the complex and vexed ways in which Russians have negotiated the thin line between nature and culture over the past two hundred years. In English.
  
  • RUSS 242 - From Pushkin to Pussy Riot: Literature Meets Music in Russia and Beyond

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    What happens to a literary text when it becomes part of a musical piece? How does an “anti-opera” sound like? What makes music socialist, formalist, or post-modernist? From the classical texts by Pushkin and Gogol that inspired Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich, to Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy, to prison memoirs of feminist rockers who dared to perform a “punk prayer” in the major Moscow cathedral, this course explores the rich tradition of literary and musical encounters, leading to a broader discussion of the relationship between the written word and sound in a larger context of art, society, and politics.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • RUSS 244 - Georgia: The Crossroad of Civilizations

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This is a June block course that will take place in the Republic of Georgia. It offers students a three and a half week immersive engagement with a unique culture at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. Using Georgia as a case study, we will explore the following questions, among others: What allows a small nation to sustain a strong sense of identity despite the constant threat of being subsumed by neighboring empires? What role do literature and other arts play in building identity? How do the opposing forces shaping the life of a nation (such as religious conservatism vs. Western liberalism) interact and possibly lead to a productive dialogue? Based in the country’s capital, Tbilisi, students will participate in a rich academic program of lectures, discussions, and field trips while simultaneously interning according to their interests at a range of organizations and institutions (libraries, museums, NGOs etc.). In English.  Accommodation with host families. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Approximate cost $5000 (includes airfare).
    Prerequisites & Notes: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Approximate cost $5000 (includes airfare).
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • RUSS 246 - Sex under Socialism: Narratives of Sexuality and Ideology

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course aims at exploring the unlikely combination of sexuality, ideology, and art in Socialist states. Focusing on literary, cinematic, and musical narratives from the Soviet Union and East Germany, we will look beyond the obvious flaws of the political systems infamous for their authoritarianism and total control. We will discuss sexual liberation and reproductive rights, shifts in gender roles and the family structure, and the development of the feminist movement and LGBTQ culture. While investigating the artistic representation of these topics, we will consider how artworks of different genres depict human experiences on the edge between the private and the ideological. Readings, subtitles, and discussion in English.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 246, GERM 246


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • RUSS 251 - Gone Writing: Travel and Literature

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    “The one who travels has a story to tell,” so a German saying goes. But what exactly are those intrinsic ties between travel and storytelling? Seeking to answer this question, we will look at two incredibly rich literary and cinematic traditions: German and Russian, focusing on the depiction of travels in the 20th and 21st-century writings and films. What was Nabokov thinking while passing through Northern Ohio in an Oldsmobile? How Kafka’s fantastic vision of America inspired Russian postmodernist experiments? What features define a travelogue or a road movie? Is it possible to keep a balance between veracity and literariness while telling a travel story? Our journey will take us through space and time, from hashish trips to the Trans-Siberian railway, from Chicago slaughterhouses to Persian palaces…all roads are open! (Lectures, discussions and readings all in English.)
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 251, GERM 251


  
  • RUSS 252 - Art as Witness in Eastern Europe and Russia

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    In a journey through literature and film of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries from Ukraine, Belarus, Russia, the Czech Republic, and beyond, we will explore ways in which writers and filmmakers as well as ordinary people have borne witness to war, political repression, revolution, and ecological catastrophe. We will consider what bearing witness is and what it can do, and investigate the various strategies and choices entailed in giving expression to individual and collective experience under conditions of violence, upheaval, political repression, and censorship. In English.  
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 252


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • RUSS 305 - Advanced Russian: Cross-Cultural Communication I

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Developes a foundation for effective cross-cultural communication; refinement of writing, reading, speaking, and aural comprehension skills to facilitate interactions with Russians today. We will use art, music and literary texts to explore a distinctively Russian understanding of time, space, family, home, and history.
    Prerequisites & Notes: RUSS 204 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
  
  • RUSS 306 - Advanced Russian: Cross-Cultural Communication II

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Builds on the skills and concepts developed in 305. Further refinement of writing, reading, speaking, and aural comprehension in Russian. Continued focus on the cultural and linguistic implications of everyday communication.
    Prerequisites & Notes: RUSS 204 or equivalent.
  
  • RUSS 411 - Special Topics: Women’s Voices

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course aims to help advanced students develop and refine their active command of written and spoken Russian by exploring the landscape of today’s Russia through the eyes of various prominent and controversial women writers,  journalists, video bloggers, actresses, film directors, and LGBT activists. Students will read, analyze, and reflect on how Russian approaches to feminist theory and practice differ from western perspectives. Involves regular discussion and hands-on projects, with individualized readings tailored to the appropriate level of each learner. In Russian with occasional forays into English. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: RUSS 305 or 306 (or concurrent enrollment) or the equivalent.
  
  • RUSS 446 - Senior Seminar. Contemporary Russophone Poetry: Art and Activism

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    This course will focus on contemporary poets from Russia, Ukraine, and beyond who write in Russian and work at the intersections of art and activism. We will listen to them reading and talking about their poems, and we will grapple with the questions they grapple with: What is poetry? What can poetry offer us right now? How and when is poetry political, and what does it mean to write poetry that is political?  No prior knowledge of or interest in poetry is required or assumed! Opportunities to co-create the syllabus. In Russian.
    Prerequisites & Notes: RUSS 306 or 411, concurrent enrollment in 306, or consent of the instructor. Note: May be repeated for credit.
  
  • RUSS 505F - Russian Honors - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Honors
  
  • RUSS 505H - Russian Honors - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Honors
  
  • RUSS 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • RUSS 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Russian and East European Studies

  
  • REES 107 - Russian History I

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    An introductory survey of Russian history from the earliest times to the mid-19th c. Beginning with an overview of the Kievan Rus and the Mongol overlordship, we will explore the diverse influences of the steppe, Orthodox Christianity, and `the west’ on the nature of the Muscovite and Imperial Russian state, the relationship between state and society, the formation of national and imperial identities, and dominant cultural values.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Counts towards the History major and the REES major.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 107


  
  • REES 108 - Russian History II

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Beginning with the reform era in mid-19th century, this course examines the processes that led to the revolutions of 1917 and the consolidation of Soviet power; the formation and nature of the Stalinist system; the Soviet experience of World War II and the origins of the Cold War; post-Stalin efforts at reform and factors which led to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991; the course ends with a brief consideration of the Yeltsin and Putin regimes.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 108


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • REES 360 - Constructing the Russian Revolutionary Self

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    What role do individuals play in revolutionary history? How do understandings of identity change in moments of upheaval? How do scholars use ‘ego-documents’ as historical sources? This research seminar is an exploration of selfhood in the modern Russian revolutionary tradition. Through treatises, memoirs, artworks, and films, we will examine how nihilists, populists, Marxists, feminists, and the militant working class constructed new forms of radical subjectivity. The seminar will culminate in a research paper that will investigate, through primary sources, both revolutionary biography as well as the challenges that revolution poses to the idea of biography itself.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 360


  
  • REES 481 - Stalinism

    FC SSCI CD WADV
    4 credits
    A political system, an economic project, a civilization, a crime: what was Stalinism? I.V. Stalin was the de facto leader of the Soviet Union from 1924 until his death in 1953.His name is synonymous with the boldest triumphs and most grotesque tragedies of twentieth-century socialism. This course investigates the intense debates surrounding the nature and legacy of Stalinism. It will analyze a series of crucial developments in modern Russian history-socialist realism, the Gulag, the show trials, collectivization, the Second World War-and explore how warring interpretations over Stalinism still shape the historical and political landscape of the present.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 481


  
  • REES 500 - Honors

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    REES Honors course

Sociology

  
  • SOCI 110 - Introduction to Sociology: Social Structure, Inequality, and Behavior

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This course will provide you with a way to think about and understand the social world and your place within it. We will examine theoretical concepts and methodologies with a wide variety of classic and contemporary empirical studies. This course addresses questions such as: How do we know which direction to face in an elevator? What are the causes and consequences of social inequality? How do some behaviors become designated ‘deviant’ and others ‘normal’?
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • SOCI 112 - Introduction to Sociology: You’re Not the Boss of You

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Learn the methods and theories that sociologists use to understand our mass society that emerged out of 19th -century industrial and political revolutions. This young science?s insights will help us understand contemporary controversies around inequality, social change, gender, race and power. This course will familiarize you with the relationship between sociology and other disciplines, techniques for reading original research articles, basic sociological writing skills, and mostly importantly, the social origin of individual thought and action.
  
  • SOCI 120 - Introduction to Sociology: Principles of Sociology

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the discipline of sociology-its major concepts, theories, subfields, and methods-focusing on “thinking sociologically.” The first part of the course examines what sociologists do, how they see the world, and how sociology differs from other disciplines. Using these insights, we will explore substantive areas of the field-social organization, inequalities, institutions, and change-using both American and international examples. This course will help students develop understandings of sociological theories and the social world’s structures and inequalities while also encouraging students to apply these understandings to their everyday lives.  
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • SOCI 122 - Introduction to Sociology: Principles of Sociological Thinking

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the discipline that will acquaint students with sociological concepts and methodology. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the components of society: from institutions to individuals, in keeping with Mills’ “sociological imagination”. Important issues addressed include the relationship between economy and institutions, stratification, and gender/racial-ethnic/class divisions. Current sociological literature is used to both introduce concepts and help students interpret scholarly writing. Emphasis will be placed on understanding social inequality and the link between the individual and social structure.
  
  • SOCI 124 - Introduction to Sociology: Classics of Sociology

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Modern sociology was born in the context of transition from traditional to modern societies in the West. This dramatic transformation opened a whole new series of social problems which have defined the modern era. We will explore the ways in which some of the most important figures of sociology explained the contrast between traditional and modern societies, and the mechanism of transition from one to the other. We will focus on problems related to the growth of the division of labor and individualism, class conflict, the disintegration of community, and estrangement. Throughout the course students will be encouraged to analyze their personal experiences and problems of contemporary society in terms of sociological concepts.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • SOCI 130 - Introduction to Sociology: Social Problems

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, theoretical perspectives, and social themes in contemporary sociology. Topics of discussion and research include stratification, ascriptive processes and the social construction of public problems. We will consider what is distinctive about a sociological perspective on the world and discuss the nature of sociological description and explanation.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
    Community Based Learning
  
  • SOCI 133 - Introduction to Sociology: Rules for the Game of Life

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Every person’s “game” of life begins the same: we are born. Yet, lives unfold in a multitude of ways. This course uses a sociological framework to unpack the written and unwritten rules of life. Why are some people equipped with advantages, while others accumulate disadvantages? What are some of the taken-for-granted aspects of life that go under the radar? We will read classical and contemporary sociological works on topics such as power, inequality, socialization, culture, and social control to better understand how sociologists study society and interpret individuals’ trajectories.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • SOCI 144 - Introduction to Sociology: Organizations and Social Change

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This introductory course examines the sociological study of society with a focus on the relationship between individuals and society and the role of social institutions in societal transformation. Major theoretical and concepts will be explored drawing on a variety of classic and contemporary perspectives to analyze norms and cultural values, social inequalities, and forms of social relationships and interactions.
  
  • SOCI 165 - Introduction to Sociology: Understanding Social Behavior and Structural Inequality

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    In this course you will learn about the discipline of sociology, including its historical development, its main theories and methods, and its range of topics. You will also learn how sociologists develop theories, formulate research questions, and collect and analyze data to understand how humans behave in various contexts, as well as how societies change over time. We will examine topics such as social interactions, culture, ecology, power, globalization, race, gender, sexuality, inequality, crime, social movements, and revolutions.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • SOCI 203 - Sociology of Sexuality

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Sociologists study the social origins of sexuality: how shared beliefs shape what we desire, what is taboo or what shames us. Historical and cross-cultural research illuminates the way modern sexuality transformed systems of dating, marriage, homosexuality, government, economics and racial classification. Following Freud, Foucault, feminist and queer theorists, learn why sociologists are skeptical of essentialist explanations that rely on biology and favor theories that recognize sexuality as a diverse, ever-changing function of cultural institutions.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 203


  
  • SOCI 214 - Social Movements

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Social movements are collective attempts to change the way people live their lives, how governments govern, and how economic systems produce and distribute goods. This course focuses on theoretical domains in the sociological study of social movements and general social processes rather than on specific movements. Substantive work on specific movements is used to explain issues such as mobilization, tactics, ideology, as well as how the social context in which a movement takes place matters.
  
  • SOCI 215 - Race, Immigration, and the Asian American Experience

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    How do race and culture define who belongs to the nation? For instance, how can ethnic minorities at times be ‘out whiting whites but still be denied full citizenship? We answer these questions by examining Asian Americans efforts for belonging and social justice. Topics include generational change, the war on terror, media, trans-nationalism, multi-racials, pan ethnicity, identity, and much more, and will be addressed from an intersectional approach. Readings come from many disciplines, with stress on sociology.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in sociology.
  
  • SOCI 216 - Medical Sociology

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course introduces students to key concepts and theories in the subfield of medical sociology. Topics covered include: social determinants of health; medical racism; health disparities; stress; health behaviors; the profession of medicine; mental health; medicalization; the framing of sickness as deviance; illness narratives; and landmark healthcare legislation in the United States. Particular attention is paid to social inequality in health and medicine, highlighting how a person’s ability to prioritize wellness, survive illness, and find success in prominent healthcare professions reflects privilege and imbalanced distributions of power along lines of race, socioeconomic status, and gender.
    Prerequisites & Notes: An introduction to Sociology course.
  
  • SOCI 224 - Sociology of Sport

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course will focus on sport as a social institution and cultural phenomenon. Using an intersectional framework, students will learn to critically assess sport in the areas of identity, education, the body; fandom and economy. The goals of the course are to understand sport as an institution, develop critical analytical skills by examining issues relevant to sport and to understand how sport is an area where inequality and power can be examined.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One introductory sociology course.
  
  • SOCI 230 - Social Change and Political Transformation in Eastern Europe

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course focuses on Eastern Europe as the first relatively backward region in the world capitalist system. We will begin with some major theories of social change and a historical introduction to the region. Next, we will turn to communist revolutions, Stalinism, reform communism, the rise of dissent and the revolutions of 1989. Much of the course will be devoted to the post-communist era, attempts to build democracy and capitalism, and the rise of nationalism.
    This course is cross-listed with POLT 214


  
  • SOCI 241 - American Urbanism

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Explore a century of American hopes and fears about cities through the archetypes of Chicago and Los Angeles. Learn to see cities as built environments, ways of life, sources of community, and political economies. These paradigms ground our discussions of forces that shape cities and define American culture, including: race and residential segregation, technology, suburbanization, immigration, and gentrification. Central to this course are documentary films, field trips and curiosity about the cities you know.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in sociology.
  
  • SOCI 250 - Sociology of Popular Culture

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This course focuses on the relationship between popular culture, media, and society, and provides an overview of social structure, content, audiences and effects. Culture is discussed in relation to its institutional, economic, and social contexts. The course examines a variety of popular cultural forms (e.g., music, film, and sports) and looks closely at media production and consumption as cultural practices. We will also explore recent debates about the relationship between culture and society.
  
  • SOCI 254 - Political Sociology

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course is intended as an introduction to a major  subfield  of sociology, the sociology of politics. We will begin with basic concepts (power, types of authority, the state, representation, citizenship rights). We will proceed to explore the social conditions of democracy, class conflict, bureaucratization, the elitist critique of democracy, the weakness of American socialism, the nature of class/elite power in the United States, and the rise of fascism in interwar Europe.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One introductory course in Sociology or Politics or by consent of the instructor.
  
  • SOCI 275 - Enacting the Law

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Where does law come from? Law and society studies how law is the product of cultural meanings rather than merely their cause. Using examples from sociology, political science, anthropology and history, we study how everyday understandings underpin and conflict with legal institutions when defining crime, marriage and law itself. Assignments include conducting interviews about disputes, analyzing legal changes, and observing legal proceedings: the formal and informal ways law gets enacted every day.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Introduction to Sociology recommended.
  
  • SOCI 277 - Race and Ethnic Relations

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course introduces and reviews the nature of relations between racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. We examine concepts, perspectives, and research on these relations, including the role of racism, prejudice, and discrimination. Furthermore, we explore the nature and the impact of immigration and institutionalized racism in the United States.  
  
  • SOCI 284 - Environmental Sociology

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course introduces students to the growing intellectual and pragmatic focus on the relationship between people and the environment. Throughout the semester, we will investigate the ways in which people and the environment interact with one another, examine how those interactions are influenced by socio-cultural processes such as political power and social inequality, and explore various responses to environmental issues, including individual behaviors, social movements, and policies that legislate human interactions with the natural world.
  
  • SOCI 301 - Social Research Methods

    FC SSCI QFR
    4 credits
    This course introduces students to the analytical logic and skills required for research in sociology. Emphasis is placed on teaching and executing the research process. Information literacy goals are addressed, such as evaluating the appropriateness, reliability and accuracy of different types of information; developing familiarity with sources of available data; generating new data; and interpreting empirical information within a theoretical framework. As groups, students work on research projects throughout the semester.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One introductory course in Sociology. Priority given to Sociology Majors. Students must register also for SOCI 302.
  
  • SOCI 302 - Social Research Methods Lab

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    This course introduces students to the analytical logic and skills required for research in sociology. Emphasis is placed on teaching and executing the research process. Information literacy goals are addressed, such as evaluating the appropriateness, reliability and accuracy of different types of information; developing familiarity with sources of available data; generating new data; and interpreting empirical information within a theoretical framework. As groups, students work on research projects throughout the semester.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One introductory course in Sociology. Preference given to Sociology majors. Students must register also for SOCI 301.
  
  • SOCI 303 - Classical and Contemporary Sociological Theory

    FC SSCI WADV
    4 credits
    Classical sociology arose in response to social problems opened up by the advent of industrial society, from the disintegration of community and the decline of religion to class conflict and the rationalization of social life. The founding fathers of modern sociology-Durkheim, Marx, and Weber-formulated their theories in response to these problems and established three distinct traditions in sociological theory. This course explores continuities between classical and contemporary sociology in each of these three traditions.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Priority given to Sociology majors. Introduction to Sociology is strongly recommended.
  
  • SOCI 314 - Unequal Educations

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course focuses on education as a social institution and the inequalities structured within it. Using theory and empirical evidence, education in the United States will be examined from pre-school through post-secondary levels. The intersections of education and other institutions, (e.g. political, economic and familial) are analyzed and include discussions of race/ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality. Further, the role of education in social reproduction and social control will be examined.
  
  • SOCI 326 - Autoethnography and the Life Course

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    What can individuals’ narratives reveal about the blueprints for society and mechanisms of social change? This course provides a comprehensive examination of life course sociology, including its major theoretical bases, key concepts, and complementary modes of inquiry such as autoethnography and life story interviewing. Contemplating how the meaning of ‘growing up’ and the experience of ‘aging’ changes with time, students will consider how age is a social construct that acts as a demographic characteristic of individuals, a guidepost for the timing of normative life events, and a stratifying feature of society that shapes unequal distributions of resources in later life.
    Prerequisites & Notes: An introduction to Sociology course.
  
  • SOCI 338 - Prostitution and Social Control: Governing Loose Women

    FC SSCI CD WADV
    4 credits
    Prostitution is a site of easy truths and inevitable conflict because of cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, ethnicity and citizenship. We probe these intersecting meanings by reviewing the wide range of empirical meanings attributed to prostitution and the ways modern forces have transformed them, especially the state. Taking cues from Michel Foucault, we analyze why recent legal solutions cannot fulfill expectations and discuss how the social control of prostitution might actually cause it.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Related intermediate course in these departments. Restrictions: Closed to first year students.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 339


  
  • SOCI 340 - Nationalism, Culture & Politics Under & After Dictatorship: Spain and Yugoslavia in the 20th Century

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The 20th century histories of Spain and Yugoslavia run surprisingly parallel but have resulted in widely different outcomes. Why? This course analyzes the interaction among nationalism, culture, and politics in both countries through sociological, historical, literary, and visual materials. Special attention is paid to late state-building, the rise of competing nationalisms, civil wars, and their legacies, dictatorship, collective memories, democratic transition (Spain), and state collapse (Yugoslavia.)
    Prerequisites & Notes: Taught in English.
    This course is cross-listed with HISP 340


  
  • SOCI 348 - Constructing Immigrant Communities

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Why do people migrate? What kinds of jobs do they attain, and with what impact on other groups? Why and when do they maintain transnational communities or choose to assimilate? How does the second generation make sense of its experiences? Taking a comparative ethnic approach, we will examine immigrants? adaptation to better understand the nation and global processes generally. We will examine how race, ethnicity, gender, class, trans-nationalism, and sexuality shape these processes.
  
  • SOCI 352 - Sociology of Global China

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course focuses on the historical and contemporary realities of China’s intimate connections with global development, as well as its engagement with and embeddedness within the world. The first part of the course focuses on the global interests and ideologies that spurred events within China, from the Chinese Revolution to Tiananmen. The second part of the course focuses on China’s going global and influence on the world beyond its borders. We conclude with the global competition between the West and China. Students will be equipped with the knowledge and perspectives to think about China’s global relations and impacts.
  
  • SOCI 364 - Sociology and the Global South

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    In this course you will learn about the discipline of sociology in the Global South, with a special emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). This includes examining its historical development in this region and analyzing some if its main theorists, scholars, and activists. We will examine topics such as social interactions, culture, ecology, power, globalization, race, gender, sexuality, inequality, crime, social movements, and revolutions (LAC).  
  
  • SOCI 386 - Nightlife: Place, Identity, and Feeling Alive

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    What does it mean to feel truly alive only at certain times and places? In this course, we consider the geographic places and cultural practices of nightlife. We will explore the ways nightlifes risks and rewards are produced, distributed, and regulated to understand their seeming paradoxes: the same physical location can be hedonistic and someones daily grind, carnivalesque and tightly scripted, liminal and big business, criminal and completely quotidian. Nightlife shapes our identities and reproduces social inequalities, but these fleeting experiences also circumscribe the places we spend most of our timework and home. Fieldtrips required.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 386


  
  • SOCI 387 - Serving the Public: Labor & Place in Cafes, Bars, & Restaurants

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    What does it mean for public life to flourish in privately owned spaces? This course explores the history, impacts, and transformations of restaurants, cafés, and bars. These have been credited with sustaining community and launching revolutions, acclaim that often ignores the everyday reality of these small businesses. We explore their labor conditions, especially for women and immigrants, and the connections between the commodities they sell and histories of colonialism and globalization. The pleasures of being served in public are profound and enrich cities and lives, but they are unequally distributed and their full costs are not always on the bill.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • SOCI 387OC - Serving the Public: Labor & Place in Cafes, Bars, & Restaurants

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    What does it mean for public life to flourish in privately owned spaces? This course explores the history, impacts, and transformations of restaurants, cafés, and bars. These have been credited with sustaining community and launching revolutions, acclaim that often ignores the everyday reality of these small businesses. We explore their labor conditions, especially for women and immigrants, and the connections between the commodities they sell and histories of colonialism and globalization. The pleasures of being served in public are profound and enrich cities and lives, but they are unequally distributed and their full costs are not always on the bill.
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course is part of the StudiOC “Eat! Drink! Savor! Labor!” Learning Community
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    Community Based Learning
  
  • SOCI 390 - Practicum In Community Learning

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    This practicum explores academic concepts studied in the Sports, Culture and Society learning community by students participating in a series of service and research initiatives across campus and in the Oberlin Public Schools. These activities, informed by the academic study of sports as a cultural form and social institution, will examine the role sports already plays in the lives of youth and college students. In particular, activities will support integration of the physical, intellectual, and emotional well-being of the students in the learning community, and in the broader community they will serve.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Enrollment in FYSP 054: Sports: Contested Contests.
  
  • SOCI 391H - Practicum - Half

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    This course combines individual internships and private readings on a subject matter related to the internship-for example, an internship in a social service agency and readings and discussion on poverty and welfare issues.
    Prerequisites & Notes: See individual faculty. Note: At the discretion of the instructor, grading for this course may be P/NP only Prerequisites: Two courses in Sociology
  
  • SOCI 420 - Social Inequalities: Class, Race, and Gender

    FC SSCI CD WADV
    4 credits
    This course will explore contemporary sociological approaches in the study of social inequality. The enduring structure and reproduction of inequalities along axes of class, race and gender are core problems of sociology. This seminar will examine these issues by first considering various theoretical issues utilized by scholars in the field. We will then examine how different thinkers have implemented of these theories and concepts in a variety of innovative case studies.
  
  • SOCI 426 - Alcohol and Culture: Social Control Under the Influence

    FC SSCI CD WADV
    4 credits
    Alcohol lubricates memorable celebrations yet also causes disease, tragedy and the loss of self-control. This course explores how the meanings of alcohol are as powerful as its chemistry. We examine communities where alcoholism is rare to those where is rampant and the social movements that have shifted norms and legislation. At bottom, the sociology of alcohol highlights our assumptions about free will, social control, and rewarding social relations. Participants will produce original empirical research. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course may also count for the major in (consult the program or department major requirements) : LAWS
    Restrictions: Closed to first and second year students, instructor consent required. Pre-reqs: Social research methods or equivalent
  
  • SOCI 429 - Sociology of Black-ish: The Black Middle Class in America

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    What are some of the unique challenges middle-class Black Americans face? Through viewing Black-ish , a sitcom that portrays a Black family’s day-to-day life in a predominantly white neighborhood, and reading sociological texts on the Black middle class, this class aims to give students a better understanding of the persistent salience of race and racism in the U.S. and the nuances of Black identity. We will read classic scholarship from sociologists such as DuBois and Frazier as well as more contemporary work on the Black middle class focused on topics including education, neighborhoods, work, wealth, consumption, culture, leisure, family, and health.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Introductory Sociology
  
  • SOCI 431 - Communism and Intellectuals: From Utopia to Disillusionment

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This seminar explores the development of communism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe through historiography, literature and film. The main part of the course is devoted to early revolutionary dilemmas, the relationship of intellectuals to the revolution in Soviet Russia and the West, and the rise of Stalinism. With novels by Gladkov, Silone, Koestler, Solzhenitsyn and Milosz, and films by Beaty, Bertolucci, Mikhalkov and Makavejev.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two courses in Sociology or consent of instructor.
  
  • SOCI 438 - Seminar: Coal, Communities and Culture

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This seminar focuses on coal and its impact on people and the environment. Throughout the semester, we will investigate the human and environmental impact of each phase of the lifespan of coal, including extraction, processing, transport, and burning. We will also discuss alternatives to coal power. The course incorporates academic research, documentary films, guest speakers, and an examination of the ways in which Oberlin College and the surrounding community are working to reach carbon neutrality.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Introduction to Sociology
  
  • SOCI 464 - Empires and World Inequality

    FC SSCI CD WADV
    4 credits
    In this course you will learn why some countries are classified as “developed,” “advanced,” “industrialized,” or “affluent,” while others are labeled as “underdeveloped,” “emerging,” “agrarian,” or “poor,” as well as how of this state of affairs came about. We will examine some theories of why some countries are rich and others are not, as well as several historical case studies of how raw materials were commodified and traded from the Global South into the Global North. We will study the ecological degradation, as well as the human exploitation, common to these episodes, as well as possible paths to transcend the asymmetric power relations characterizing the modern world.
  
  • SOCI 491F - Senior Honors - Full

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Senior Honors
  
  • SOCI 491H - Senior Honors - Half

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    Senior Honors.
  
  • SOCI 499 - Advanced Research Methods

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This is a required seminar for students accepted into the sociology honors program. Students will submit IRB applications, obtain datasets, or negotiate fieldsite access as applicable.
    Prerequisites & Notes: SOCI 301 and SOCI 302
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 499


  
  • SOCI 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval.  Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student.  Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO.  To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • SOCI 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Statistics

  
  • STAT 113 - Introduction to Statistics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    A standard introduction to statistics for students with a good background in mathematics. Topics covered include exploratory data analysis, descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, estimation, and statistical inference. A broad spectrum of examples is employed. Statistical software is introduced, but no prior computer experience is assumed.
    Prerequisites & Notes: STAT 113 and 114 assume no prior knowledge of statistics and cover the same material, though STAT 114 emphasizes biological examples. A self-diagnostic exam (to check your comfort level with algebra and numerical manipulation) is available on the Mathematics Department’s “Resources” website (or contact an instructor). If you scored a 3 or higher on the AP Statistics exam, if you are somewhat comfortable with introductory statistics, or if you have a strong mathematical background (even with no statistics background), you should instead take STAT 205.
  
  • STAT 114 - Introduction to Biostatistics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    A standard introduction to statistics for students with a good background in mathematics. Topics covered include exploratory data analysis, descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, estimation, and statistical inference. Biological and medical examples are emphasized. Statistical software is introduced, but no prior computer experience is assumed.
    Prerequisites & Notes: STAT 113 and 114 assume no prior knowledge of statistics and cover the same material, though STAT 114 emphasizes biological examples. A self-diagnostic exam (to check your comfort level with algebra and numerical manipulation) is available on the Mathematics Department’s “Resources” website (or contact an instructor). If you scored a 3 or higher on the AP Statistics exam, if you are somewhat comfortable with introductory statistics, or if you have a strong mathematical background (even with no statistics background), you should instead take STAT 205.
  
  • STAT 205 - Statistics and Modeling

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    An introduction to statistics and, in particular, linear models for students with some background in statistics and a good background in mathematics. Topics covered include exploratory data analysis, probability, sampling, estimation, statistical inference, multiple regression, one-factor and multi-factor analysis of variance, and analysis of categorical data via logistic regression. Statistical software is used heavily. Formerly offered as STAT 215.
    Prerequisites & Notes: A score of 3 or higher on the Statistics AP Exam, some comfort with introductory statistics, or a strong mathematical background (even with no statistics background). This class reviews everything from the AP Statistics curriculum, before continuing to more advanced topics. Takes the place of the STAT 113, STAT 213 sequence.
  
  • STAT 209 - Data Computing and Visualization

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    An introduction to the principles and practice of creating informative and effective data visualizations to summarize and describe patterns in potentially large and complex datasets. In the service of effective and reproducible visualization, principles and tools for automating data manipulation (for example, scraping data from the web, merging data from multiple sources, and cleaning, filtering, and transforming data) will also be covered. Selected topics from machine learning, such as dimensionality reduction and clustering, approached from an applied perspective, may be included in this latter category.
  
  • STAT 213 - Statistical Modeling

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    A second course in statistics with an emphasis on creating, fitting, evaluating, and using statistical models of data. Topics include linear models of continuous data with continuous and categorical predictors (multiple regression, analysis of variance and analysis of covariance), models of categorical data, such as logistic regression, and techniques for selecting among competing models, such as cross-validation.
    Prerequisites & Notes: STAT 113, STAT 114, or consent of the instructor.
  
  • STAT 237 - Bayesian Computation

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    An introduction to Bayesian statistical methods, which will be contrasted with standard, frequentist statistical inference. Conjugate prior distributions will be studied, but computational methods will be developed to allow for arbitrary prior distributions.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MATH 133 or consent of the instructor. Notes: Given in alternate years only.
  
  • STAT 336 - Mathematical Statistics

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    The theory of probability is applied to problems of statistics. Topics include sampling theory, point and interval estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses, regression, and analysis of variance.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MATH 232 and MATH 335 335. Note: Given in alternate years only.
  
  • STAT 339 - Probabilistic Modeling and Machine Learning

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    n overview of statistical models and algorithms used in machine learning for classification, prediction, clustering, hidden variable modeling, and sequence learning. Fundamentals of probability, Bayesian inference and decision theory, model selection, and stochastic optimization. Modeling approaches include directed and undirected graphs, parametric, nonparametric and semi-parametric mixture models, Hidden Markov Models, and selected non-probabilistic techniques such as Support Vector Machines and Neural Networks. Emphasis throughout is on probabilistic reasoning from data. Applications selected from a variety of domains, based on student interest.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MATH 231, CSCI 150 and at least some additional experience with linear algebra and/or probability would be helpful.

Studio Art

  
  • ARST 110 - Introduction to Drawing

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Focused on drawing from observation to sharpen perceptual awareness, this course will initiate students in the practice and appreciation of graphic expression, with an emphasis on developing an understanding of both traditional and contemporary pictorial concerns. Diagrammatic line and principles of perspective will be presented as spatial and compositional concepts. Assignments will include: graphically locating objects on a ground plane; use of line, value, shape, texture as descriptive design vocabulary; the human figure as dynamic form; engaging representation and abstraction as responsive narrative.
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course counts towards the introductory and 2D distribution requirements.

    This course was formerly taught as ARTS 040.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
 

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