Feb 22, 2024  
Course Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Course Catalog 2022-2023 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Search


This is a comprehensive listing of all active, credit-bearing courses offered by Oberlin College and Conservatory since Fall 2016. Courses listed this online catalog may not be offered every semester; for up to date information on which courses are offered in a given semester, please see PRESTO. 

For the most part, courses offered by departments are offered within the principal division of the department. Many interdisciplinary departments and programs also offer courses within more than one division.

Individual courses may be counted simultaneously toward more than one General Course Requirement providing they carry the appropriate divisional attributes and/or designations.

 

Geosciences

  
  • GEOS 501H - Research in Geology - Half

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Independent or faculty-sponsored research. Students should select a topic and make other necessary arrangements in consultation with an individual faculty member. Consent of instructor required.
  
  • GEOS 503F - Honors - Full

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Honors by permission of the department.
  
  • GEOS 503H - Honors - Half

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Honors by permission of the department.
  
  • GEOS 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • GEOS 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

German

  
  • GERM 101 - Elementary German

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    German 101 comprises the first half of a two semester Elementary German course of study. Acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar along with practice in speaking and writing. Early introduction of spoken German, with reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Use of language laboratory encouraged.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • GERM 102 - Elementary German

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    German 102 comprises the second half of a two semester Elementary German course of study. Acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar along with practice in speaking and writing. Increased emphasis on spoken German, with reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Taught chiefly in German. Use of language laboratory encouraged.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 101 or qualification by placement test.
  
  • GERM 203 - Intermediate German

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    German 203 comprises the first half of a two-semester Intermediate German course. Increasing mastery of the basic skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) and a selective grammar review. Readings of narrative prose, drama, and poetry by mainly contemporary authors, along with cultural/historical texts from the 20th century. Completion of Intermediate German will enable students to read a broad range of literary and non-literary texts and to conduct research in their major fields.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 102 or qualification by placement test.
  
  • GERM 204 - Intermediate German

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Increasing mastery of the basic skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing). Readings of narrative prose, drama, and poetry by mainly contemporary authors, along with cultural/historical texts from the 20th and 21st centuries. Completion of Intermediate German will enable students to read a broad range of literary and non-literary texts and to conduct research in their major fields.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 203 or qualification by placement test.
  
  • GERM 205 - Intermediate Intensive German

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course provides a systematic review of German grammar along with continued attention to idiomatic spoken German. In addition, participants will expand their reading skills, focusing during the first half of the semester on short stories, and in the second half on an influential novel. Prerequisite: First-year college-level German or the equivalent and successful completion of the department’s placement exam. This course is not intended for students who have taken German 203 and 204.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 101 and 102 or equivalent, and GERM placement exam.
  
  • GERM 232 - Writing the City: The Urban Experience from Expressionism to New Objectivity

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    A city in the times of crisis: how can it be represented in literature, art, and film? To answer this question, we will focus on Berlin of the Weimar era (1918-33). This was a period of political upheavals and drastic social changes that began with the emergence of the new democracy and ended with the rise of national socialism. We will explore literary and artistic reflections of the most topical aspects of life in the modern metropolis: from the everyday absurdities and anxieties to the fight against the historical inequalities. Class readings and discussions will cover works of different genres: writings by Benjamin, Brecht, Kafka, and others; films, music, and visual artworks. Please note: this course meets at the same time as GERM 332. Students who have studied German before on the intermediate level or above should enroll in GERM 332. (Prerequisites: German 203/204 or placement test.) All other students should enroll in GERM 232 (Prerequisites: None.) Class readings will have two options: German or English. Other class activities will include discussions in English and group work in German (for GERM 332) or English (for GERM 232).
  
  • GERM 246 - Sex under Socialism: Narratives of Sexuality and Ideology

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course aims at exploring the unlikely combination of sexuality, ideology, and art in Socialist states. Focusing on literary, cinematic, and musical narratives from the Soviet Union and East Germany, we will look beyond the obvious flaws of the political systems infamous for their authoritarianism and total control. We will discuss sexual liberation and reproductive rights, shifts in gender roles and the family structure, and the development of the feminist movement and LGBTQ culture. While investigating the artistic representation of these topics, we will consider how artworks of different genres depict human experiences on the edge between the private and the ideological. Readings, subtitles, and discussion in English.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 246, RUSS 246


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • GERM 251 - Gone Writing: Travel and Literature

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    “The one who travels has a story to tell,” so a German saying goes. But what exactly are those intrinsic ties between travel and storytelling? Seeking to answer this question, we will look at two incredibly rich literary and cinematic traditions: German and Russian, focusing on the depiction of travels in the 20th and 21st-century writings and films. What was Nabokov thinking while passing through Northern Ohio in an Oldsmobile? How Kafka’s fantastic vision of America inspired Russian postmodernist experiments? What features define a travelogue or a road movie? Is it possible to keep a balance between veracity and literariness while telling a travel story? Our journey will take us through space and time, from hashish trips to the Trans-Siberian railway, from Chicago slaughterhouses to Persian palaces…all roads are open! (Lectures, discussions and readings all in English.)
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 251, RUSS 251


  
  • GERM 305 - Conversation and Composition

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    Expansion and refinement of speaking, writing, and listening skills through a variety of in-class activities (including films and writing). Readings and discussions will cover topics of current social, political, and cultural interest in the German-language countries as reflected in the media and in essays and articles by creative writers.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 204 or qualification by placement test.
    Sustainability
  
  • GERM 311 - Enlightenment to Classicism

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    A study of major movements, problems, and oeuvres in the literature from the 18th to the mid-19th century (Enlightenment through Romanticism). This course will explore the culturally productive tension between nascent nationalism and Goethean cosmopolitanism. Prose, drama, and poetry by Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, and others. This course is intended for students who have not yet done 400-level work in German literature.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 204 or qualification by placement test.
  
  • GERM 312 - German Literature: Young Germany to Modernism

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    Provides a foundation for literary studies through 19th and 20th century drama, prose and poetry. Features works by Büchner, Grillparzer, Droste-Hülshoff, Thomas Mann, Lasker-Schüler, Kafka and Brecht. This course is intended for students who have not yet done 400-level work in German.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 204 or qualification by placement test.
  
  • GERM 313 - Live and Work in Germany: Business German

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The course deals with business-specific topics that give students an insight into the German economy. the focus is on expanding the topic-specific vocabulary and dealing with relevant grammatical phenomena. In addition, students will be prepared for the job application process in Germany. Students will create application documents, conduct job interviews and learn about culture-specific rules of conduct in business. Various means of communication, such as letter writing, professional emails, and telephone conversations will be covered in class.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GERM 204 or equivalent.
  
  • GERM 315 - Max Kade German Writer-in Residence

    HC ARHU CD
    2 credits
    Reading and discussion of selected writings of the 2015 Max Kade German Writer-in-Residence. Taught in German.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One 300-Level course or equivalent knowledge of German.
  
  • GERM 327 - *teuta > þeoda > diutsch > Deutsch: A History of the German Language

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Beginning with its Indo-European ancestry, this course will uncover the sound changes that brought us the Germanic language family. We will then identify the shifts that German underwent to distinguish itself from its Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian, and Gothic relatives to provide the earliest record of the German language, known as Old High German. We will then trace its development through the medieval period of Middle High German, Martin Luther’s Early New German, and finally to New High German. Particular attention will be paid to Middle High German later in the course as we dive into some of the stories of knights-errant and courtly poetry. Course taught in English.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 1 year of German or equivalent
  
  • GERM 332 - Writing the City: The Urban Experience from Expressionism to New Objectivity

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    A city in the times of crisis: how can it be represented in literature, art, and film? To answer this question, we will focus on Berlin of the Weimar era (1918-33). This was a period of political upheavals and drastic social changes that began with the emergence of the new democracy and ended with the rise of national socialism. We will explore literary and artistic reflections of the most topical aspects of life in the modern metropolis: from the everyday absurdities and anxieties to the fight against the historical inequalities. Class readings and discussions will cover works of different genres: writings by Benjamin, Brecht, Kafka, and others; films, music, and visual artworks.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Please note: this course meets at the same time as GERM 332. Students who have studied German before on the intermediate level or above should enroll in GERM 332. (Prerequisites: German 203/204 or placement test.) All other students should enroll in GERM 232 (Prerequisites: None.) Class readings will have two options: German or English. Other class activities will include discussions in English and group work in German (for GERM 332) or English (for GERM 232).
  
  • GERM 336 - Jews and Other Germans

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Explores the highly productive Jewish response to modernity from 1750 to 1939 in Central Europe, which engendered lasting transformations in European and American Jewish life in particular, and in European culture and society, more generally. We will consider literary, artistic, political, and scientific achievements of German Jews, and discuss the relationship between their work and their Jewish background. Readings drawn from central German-Jewish figures including Moses Mendelssohn,  Herzl,  Heine,  Auerbach, Schnitzler, and Kafka. In English.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is cross-listed with JWST 336


  
  • GERM 352 - Underrepresented Voices of German Literature

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    by continuing the long Oberlin tradition of introducing students to the Alright, so you know who Goethe is, and you’ve read some Schiller and some Kafka and lots of other famous German poetry and prose, but what’s missing? This course is designed to start filling in some of the gaps by continuing the long Oberlin tradition of introducing students to the incredible diversity represented in German literature. We will broaden the scope with Turkish-German and Afro-German writers, along with other POC-and specifically WOC-who have contributed greatly to the German written word and continue to do so. Course is taught in German.
    Prerequisites & Notes: German 312/311 or equivalent
  
  • GERM 411 - German Today: Seminar in Advanced Grammar and Composition

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    The seminar is intended for students with advanced skills in German who wish to expand their competency in grammar, writing and vocabulary. Increased fluency in selected grammar topics will enable students to analyze and compose in a variety of writing styles. Utilizing a diverse array of media (e.g., newspapers, film and broadcast news), thematic content will encompass such areas as culture, literature, politics, economics, and science. Along with regular written assignments and grammar tests, active class participation is required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 300-Level Course in German.
  
  • GERM 433 - Senior Seminar: Twentieth-Century German Poetry

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Analysis of continuities and disruptions in lyrical forms during a century of political and social upheaval. Poets include Hofmannsthal, Rilke, George, Trakl, Lasker-Schüler, Brecht, Benn, Celan and a variety of post-war lyricists.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two 300-level courses in German or instructor consent.
  
  • GERM 505F - German Honors - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Honors.
  
  • GERM 505H - German Honors - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Honors.
  
  • GERM 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • GERM 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Greek

  
  • GREK 101 - Elementary Greek

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Learn to read ancient Greek! Greek is the language of Homer, Socrates, Alexander the Great, and the writers of the New Testament. In the first semester, we cover roughly two-thirds of basic Greek grammar, reading ancient Greek passages from day one. By the end of the semester, students will fully understand the Greek syntactical system, and will be reading passages adapted from the fifth-century BCE historians Herodotus and Thucydides.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • GREK 102 - Elementary Greek II

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Keep learning to read ancient Greek! We will complete the study of basic Greek language and syntax. By the end of the semester, students will read selections from Lysias’s On the Murder of Eratosthenes, a defense speech from fifth-century Athens, in which the speaker claims justification for the killing of his wife’s adulterous lover.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 101 or equivalent.
  
  • GREK 201 - Intermediate Greek I: Homer

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The year, 1083 BCE. The place, Troy. At issue, the recovery of Helen, Menelaos’ wife and the most beautiful woman in the world, who was abducted by (or ran away with) Paris, a notoriously charming Trojan. Students will learn the fundamentals of Homeric Greek and the principles of oral poetic composition by reading significant passages from the Iliad, the first written literature of the West.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 102 or equivalent.
  
  • GREK 206 - Homer’s Odyssey I

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The Odyssey is widely considered one of the most beautiful poems ever created, and we will read it in the original Greek! Course will include introduction to the Homeric Dialect, scholarship on Homer, and a research project. Course meets concurrently with GREK 306. Intermediate students should enroll in GREK 206; advanced students should enroll in GREK 306. Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 102 or equivalent
  
  • GREK 207 - Comedies of Aristophanes I

    FC ARHU CD


    4 credits
    We will read one Aristophanes’ Thesmophoriazousae in Greek, and most of the other extant plays in English translation. We will also review recent scholarship on Aristophanes, with a particular focus on his comedies as political commentary, as literary criticism, and as evidence for social and sexual norms in Classical Athens.

    Course meets concurrently with GREK 307. Intermediate students should enroll in GREK 207; advanced students should enroll in GREK 307. Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 201 or Equivalent

  
  • GREK 211 - Euripides I

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This class will translate one of the plays of Euripides with an eye to its dramaturgy, political ramifications, and literary significance. Course meets concurrently with GREK 211. Intermediate students should enroll in GREK 211; advanced students should enroll in GREK 311. Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Greek 102 or Equivalent
  
  • GREK 215 - Sophocles’ Oedipus I

    FC ARHU CD


    4 credits
    This course will focus on translating Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus with an eye to both the grammar and syntax as well as the larger meaning of the play. This is arguably the most influential play ever written and has much to teach us about politics, power, sexuality, and tragedy.

    Course meets concurrently with CLAS 215.  Intermediate students should enroll in CLAS 215; advanced students should enroll in CLAS 315.  Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 102 or its equivalent

  
  • GREK 219 - Apologies of Socrates I

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Who was Socrates? In this course we will consider the Greek texts of Socrates’ pupils, Plato and Xenophon, and attempt to interpret this enigmatic cultural, philosophical and political figure of Classical Athens. In addition to the primary texts, we will consider other accounts of Socrates, such as are found in Aristophanes’ Clouds , as well as secondary scholarship on Socrates and his place in Athenian (and our own) culture. Course meets concurrently with GREK 319. Intermediate students should enroll in GREK 219; advanced students should enroll in GREK 319. Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 102 or equivalent
  
  • GREK 220 - Courtroom Drama in Athens! I

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Legal intrigue, perjury, witness tampering, and bribery may be some of the most lasting contributions of Greek culture to the contemporary world. In this course, students will read a courtroom cases and legal speeches from ancient Athens in the original Greek language, focusing on the authors Lysias and Demosthenes. The course also will explore ancient rhetoric and the legal structure of Athenian Democracy through secondary readings. Course meets concurrently with GREK 320. Intermediate students should enroll in GREK 220; advanced students should enroll in GREK 320. Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 201 or equivalent.
  
  • GREK 221 - Intermediate Greek: Herodotus

    FC ARHU CD


    4 credits
    In this course, we will read selections from the first historian in the western tradition, Herodotus of Halicarnassus. Herodotus is a crucial source for our understanding of the rise of Greece as a world power in the fifth century BCE, as well as our understanding of the classical Persian empire. Sometimes known as “the father of lies,” Herodotus is also a problematic figure as the instigator of history as a mode of inquiry. Students will also review their knowledge of Greek grammar and syntax.

    Course meets concurrently with GREK 321.  Intermediate sutdents should enroll in GREK 221; advanced students should enroll in GREK 321.  Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Greek 201 or equivalent

  
  • GREK 304 - Greek Lyric Poetry

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The writers of Greek Lyric introduced a highly personal sensibility to the world of poetry. Selections include passages from Archilochus, Anacreon, Bacchylides, Simonides, and Solon. The course pays special attention to Sappho, the pre-eminent writer of erotic verse from archaic Greece, and the first woman poet in the West. We will consider the development of a lyric genre or genres, with attention to erotic, political, and satiric themes. Secondary readings on individual authors and their influence.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 202 or equivalent.
  
  • GREK 305 - Sophocles

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Readings and discussion of tragedy of Sophocles, with particular attention to the social and political context of fifth century Athens. Close analysis of one of his plays, likely the Trachiniae , and a survey of the criticism and scholarship dealing with Sophocles.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 202 or the equivalent.
  
  • GREK 306 - Homer’s Odyssey II

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The Odyssey  is widely considered one of the most beautiful poems ever created, and we will read it in the original Greek! Course will include introduction to the Homeric Dialect, scholarship on Homer, and a research project. Course meets concurrently with GREK 206. Intermediate students should enroll in GREK 206; advanced students should enroll in GREK 306. Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 202 or equivalent
  
  • GREK 311 - Euripides II

    FC ARHU CD WADV


    4 credits
    This class will translate one of the plays of Euripides with an eye to its dramaturgy, political ramifications, and literary significance.

    Course meets concurrently with GREK 211. Intermediate students should enroll in GREK 211; advanced students should enroll in GREK 311. Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 202 or equivalent.

  
  • GREK 315 - Sophocles’ Oedipus II

    FC ARHU CD WADV


    4 credits
    This course will focus on translating Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus with an eye to both the grammar and syntax as well as the larger meaning of the play. This is arguably the most influential play ever written and has much to teach us about politics, power, sexuality, and tragedy.

    Course meets concurrently with CLAS 215.  Intermediate students shold enroll in CLAS 215; advanced students should enroll in CLAS 315.  Course requirements will differ according to level – Advanced students will engage in additional writing assignments about the choral songs and the reception of this play.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 202 or its equivalent.

  
  • GREK 319 - Apologies of Socrates II

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Who was Socrates? In this course we will consider the Greek texts of Socrates’ pupils, Plato and Xenophon, and attempt to interpret this enigmatic cultural, philosophical and political figure of Classical Athens. In addition to the primary texts, we will consider other accounts of Socrates, such as are found in Aristophanes’Clouds , as well as secondary scholarship on Socrates and his place in Athenian (and our own) culture. Course meets concurrently withGREK219. Intermediate students should enroll inGREK219; advanced students should enroll inGREK319. Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 202 or equivalent
  
  • GREK 320 - Courtroom Drama in Athens! II

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Legal intrigue, perjury, witness tampering, and bribery may be some of the most lasting contributions of Greek culture to the contemporary world. In this course, students will read a courtroom cases and legal speeches from ancient Athens in the original Greek language, focusing on the authors Lysias and Demosthenes. The course also will explore ancient rhetoric and the legal structure of Athenian Democracy through secondary readings. Course meets concurrently with GREK 220. Intermediate students should enroll in GREK 220; advanced students should enroll in GREK 320. Course requirements will differ according to level.
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 202 or equivalent. Course meets concurrently with GREK 220.
  
  • GREK 321 - Advanced Greek: Herodotus

    FC ARHU CD


    4 credits
    In this course, we will read selections from the first historian in the western tradition, Herodotus of Halicarnassus. Herodotus is a crucial source for our understanding of the rise of Greece as a world power in the fifth century BCE, as well as our understanding of the classical Persian empire. Sometimes known as “the father of lies,” Herodotus is also a problematic figure as the instigator of history as a mode of inquiry.

    Course meets concurently with GREK 221.  Intermediate students should enroll in GREK 221; advanced students should enroll in GREK 321.  Course requirements will differ according to level – Advanced students will present reports on Greek grammar and syntax, as well as scholarly articles on Herodotus and fifth-century Greek history.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Greek 202 or equivalent

  
  • GREK 324 - Hellenistic Poetry

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    This course will focus on the poetry of Alexandria, including the writings of Callimachus, Theocritus, and Apollonius. Students will translate these Greek poets and investigate their relationship to Archaic and Classical predecessors (Homer, Hesiod, Pindar) as well as look forward to their strong influence on Roman poets of the 1st C. BCE (Horace, Vergil).
    Prerequisites & Notes: Students should have an advanced knowledge of Greek. GREK 200 or equivalent is required.
  
  • GREK 331 - Hesiod

    FC ARHU CD WADV


    4 credits
    Who is good enough to beat Homer in an archaic Greek epic poetry slam?  Hesiod, of course! We will study Hesiod’s Theogony and Works and Days in Greek.  

     
    Prerequisites & Notes: GREK 202 or equivalent

  
  • GREK 401F - Honors - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Honors.
  
  • GREK 401H - Honors - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Honors.
  
  • GREK 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • GREK 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Health and Wellness

  
  • WELL 110 - Introduction to Body Mapping

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    This course gives specific information about practical anatomy and movement in regards to artistic performance. Students will gain ease in performing and learn how improved coordination enables them to avoid fatigue, technical limitation and injury. Course objectives are as follows: to explore the principles of Body Mapping; to examine and correct errors in individual body maps; to identify and eliminate habitual patterns of tension; and to explore the effects of Body Mapping principles on musical performance.

Health Careers

  
  • HLTH 032 - Topics in Medicine and Health Care

    CC
    1 credit
    Course focuses on readings and discussions related to current issues in medicine and allied health fields. Course is intended for juniors and seniors planning to pursue such areas in the future.
  
  • HLTH 995H - Private Reading Half

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    Private Reading Half

Hispanic Studies

  
  • HISP 101 - Elementary Spanish I

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    An engaging flipped classroom set-up with a strong emphasis on communicative tasks encourages students to actively use their emerging Spanish in real-life situations. Grammar, vocabulary, and culture are studied independently prior to each class and then woven into dynamic oral and written classroom activities. Daily writing assignments and weekly meetings with writing tutors. This course is conducted in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Students with any previous knowledge of Spanish other than from Oberlin College must first take the placement exam before enrolling in this course
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • HISP 102 - Elementary Spanish II

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course is a continuation of HISP 101. An engaging flipped classroom set-up with a strong emphasis on communicative tasks encourages students to actively use their emerging Spanish in real-life situations. Grammar, vocabulary, and culture are studied independently prior to each class and then woven into dynamic oral and written classroom activities. Daily writing assignments and weekly meetings with writing tutors. This course is taught in Spanish.
  
  • HISP 157 - Approaches to the Art of the Americas

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course provides an introduction to the art of the Americas following a rough chronology from ancient through the present. Through a close analysis of each context, we will consider a range of art practices including architecture, city planning, land art, ceramics, fiber arts, printmaking, painting, and sculpture. Students will explore themes including networks of cultural exchange and migration, empire and expansion, decolonial and post-colonial methodologies, spirituality and art, nation building, modernization, and universalism.
    This course is cross-listed with ARTH 157


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • HISP 200 - Music of Latin America

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course focuses on folk and popular music of Latin America, with emphasis on theories of cosmopolitanism, appropriation, circulation, and reception.  In this class students explore musical styles as they change in response to global and technological forces.  Additionally, students explore the ways that Latin American musicians adapt to and challenge the dynamism of globalization, finding outlets in diasporic communities as inequitable political systems affect cultural creativity.  
    This course is cross-listed with ETHN 200


  
  • HISP 202 - Intermediate Spanish I

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course is the first intermediate level Spanish course. It surveys, reviews, and solidifies essential grammatical structures in the indicative and subjunctive mood through the integration of grammar, oral and written practice in exercises, conversation and readings which evolve within a cultural context. Students have to attend one weekly mandatory conversation class led by a Program Assistant, time TBA. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 102 or Placement Exam
  
  • HISP 203 - Intermediate Spanish II

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course is a continuation of HISP 202. It adopts a format integrating grammar, oral and written practice in exercises, conversation and readings which evolve within a cultural context. Students have to attend one mandatory conversation class on Tuesdays or Thursdays for one hour, time TBA.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 202 or consent of instructor.
  
  • HISP 204 - Intensive Intermediate Spanish

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course is a continuation of first-year Spanish that covers all of the material of HISP 202 and 203 in a single semester, and presumes a greater commitment from the student. The course adopts a format integrating grammar, oral and written practice in in-class exercises, conversations, and readings, which evolve within a cultural context. Besides class time, students will attend conversation sections and other online enhancement activities. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 102 or placement.
  
  • HISP 253 - Latinx Art: Past and Futures

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    In the past thirty years, Latinx art has emerged as a distinct field of study within Art History, absorbing a diverse group of artists working across styles into one category. This survey pairs an overview of Latinx art from 1945 through the present with the theories and arguments that serve as the foundation for the field. Guiding questions are: what are the possibilities and limitations of Latinx art? What role does aesthetics play? What is the future of the field? In particular, we will explore the role of Queer, Black, Indigenous, and feminist histories in the development of Latinx art. Field trips required for this course.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 100-level course in art history recommended but not required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is cross-listed with ARTH 253


  
  • HISP 294 - The Arts of Conquest and Resistance in 17th century Europe and Latin America

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    Much art and architecture produced in Europe and Latin America was closely intertwined in the seventeenth century, from Mexico City to Naples, Cuzco to Antwerp, Quito to Madrid. We will investigate how European powers used visual strategies to exercise political domination across the world, and how locals resisted these efforts by refashioning art and architecture designed to control them. This course examines a wide range of artistic production, from images made of shimmering feathers toprocessional sculptures to urban design to ephemeral art for civic performances. Field trips required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: A 100-level course in art history recommended but not required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is cross-listed with ARTH 294


  
  • HISP 303 - Conversation and Communication in Spanish

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The goal of this course is to prepare non-native speakers for the rigors and the rewards of conversing with Spanish-speakers about topics of shared interest. Reading, writing, listening and speaking skills will be emphasized as we study works in art collections, practice digital storytelling, discuss current events in the Spanish-speaking world, and pursue student-directed personal learning projects. Highly recommended for students returning from or preparing to study abroad.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 203 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 304 - Advanced Grammar and Composition

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This thematically organized course offers an in-depth review of Spanish grammar and the opportunity for students to improve develop their writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills through a broad range of assignments.
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course fulfills prerequisites for upper-division literature courses and may be counted for the major or minor.
  
  • HISP 306 - Introduction to Literary Analysis

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    Studying poems, short stories, essays, and visual arts from the Hispanic tradition (Spanish, Latin American, and Latinx) together with modern trends in literary theory, we will engage with the politics and uses of theory and critique and consider the uses of the literary in contemporary society. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 309 - Survey of Spanish Literature I: Historias Sentimentales

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    How did people feel in the past? What could literature express of their feelings? This course provides an introduction to early modern Spanish literature and culture (including visual culture) with a focus on excitement and fear, pride and shame and religious awe, as well as the ‘literary’ emotions of courtly love and philosophical melancholy. Taught in Spanish.
  
  • HISP 310 - The Struggle for Modernity

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    Progressive Spanish writers and intellectuals have consistently felt out of place in Spain, whose traditional power structures for centuries resisted the advent of modernity. Still, Spaniards managed to produce texts, images, and films of astounding quality and innovation. This course studies a selection of outstanding Spanish plays, novelas, poems, and short stories from the late 18th century to the present. Authors studied include Garcia Lorca, Sender, Becquer, Moratin, Perez Galdos, Rosalia de Castro, Gomez de Avellaneda, Unamuno, Larra, Garcia Morales, and others. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent
  
  • HISP 313 - Advanced Conversation and Communication in Spanish

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course advances and solidifies heritage and non-native speakers conversational skills and continues HISP 303 Conversational and Communication in Spanishs emphasis on developing listening and speaking skills. Oral skills (including pronunciation) will be practiced and developed through the discussion of current events from the Spanish-speaking world. Highly recommended for students returning from study abroad and for Heritage Speakers.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 315 - Crossing the Line: Early Modern Spain and Spanish America

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The Spanish Empire in Europe and America was built not only through the rule of kings, conquistadors, and missionaries, but also by subjects that often crossed the boundaries of lineage, gender, and religion, challenging established norms and categories. Focusing on a cast of deviant characters–including adventurers, tricksters and cross-dressers–this course provides an introduction to early modern Spanish American literature and culture. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 317 - Survey of Latin American Literature I: Encuentros y Desencuentros

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    We no longer call 1492 the “discovery of America” but rather the “encounter” between two continents; yet the literature of the first four centuries of the Americas is also full of misencounters, as perspectives are often creatively misunderstood to slowly create a conflictive modern Latin America. Texts (and films about the period) will include: pre-Columbian writings; conquistadors’ tales; the colonial intellectuals Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, el Inca Garcilaso, and Guaman Poma; Simón Bolivar; and a post-independence world of Romantic poets, rebels, and statesmen. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or the equivalent
  
  • HISP 318 - Inverted Utopias: The Latin American Avant-Garde

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    The course covers the innovative contributions of Latin American writers from Modernism to the Boom’s Magical Realism, giving close and thoughtful attention to cutting-edge avant-garde movements like Futurism, Fauvism, Surrealism, and Constructivism. Our objective will be to understand how the Eurocentric view of Latin America as an exotic New World is turned upside down by the writers under study. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 319 - Grandes Novelas Chicas: The Latin American Novella

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Halfway between the claustrophobic story and the tradition-laden novel, the novella is a laboratory for great writers experiments, and often a turning point for their aesthetic projects. The story of Latin America, its promises and tragedies, will be presented in works by Bombal, F. Herndez, Cortar, Garc Mquez, Fuentes, Donoso, Lispector, Bola, and Aira. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or the equivalent.
  
  • HISP 325 - Caos y Destrucción: Literatura Transatlántica de Ciencia Ficción

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    In this course, we will analyze literary works that imagine human existence in a futuristic setting. In the selected works, contemporary social and political conflicts manifest as pretexts to reflect upon and examine socio-economical and political systems that engender extreme violence and foster acute apathy within Spanish and Latin American society. Each text presents a fantastical narrative of the nation, or of events that prompt a critical interrogation of the national imaginary and identity. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 327 - Surrealism Narrative from Center to Margins

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course will begin with manifestoes and non-fictional texts by Breton and Aragon, and film, paintings, and collage-novels by Buñuel, Dalí, and Ernst, and move to two margins of Europe where Surrealism was particularly strong, Latin America and Eastern Europe. Texts by Bombal, Rulfo, Felisberto Hernández, Cortázar, early García Márquez, Walser, Schulz, and Gombrowicz; paintings and films by Varo, Kahlo, Carrington, Svankmajer, and the Quay Brothers. Taught in English.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 327


  
  • HISP 328 - Historias de Mujeres Argentinas

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Though often only recognized belatedly, women of Argentina and Uruguay have made major contributions to their nations, as poets, critics, movie stars, film-makers, and narrators. After some attention to early writers, we will focus on women since World War II: the Peronist era (Eva Per, Ocampo, diGiorgio); writers during the dictatorships (Gorodischer, Valenzuela, Peri Rossi, Sarlo); old and young film-makers (Bemberg, Martel); transnational authors (Shua, Negroni); and recent authors in Cristina Kirchner’s Argentina. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 334 - Spanish for Heritage Speakers

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Were you raised speaking Spanish but never studied it formally? This class is designed for you. The course addresses all four skills of language mastery: understanding, speaking, reading and writing but aims especially to expand vocabulary, correct common grammatical mistakes, and give students writing proficiency. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: No instructor consent required but you must be a ‘heritage’ speaker. This course fulfills prerequisites for upper-division literature courses and may be counted for the major or minor.
  
  • HISP 335 - Melodrama and Cultural Anxiety in Latin America

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Civilization and Barbarism. Immigration. Drug Wars. Eugenics. Prostitution. We will examine how melodrama has been a genre of choice for thematizing current events in relation to deep cultural metanarratives, from the 19th century novela mico-social to the contemporary telenovela. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 337 - Cien Años de Soledad

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    A close reading of Nobel Prize winner Gabriel Garc Mquez’s bestselling novel is the springboard for investigating Latin American history and politics. Bonus! Includes 100 facts you need to know to understand the book and deconstruct magical realism. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 340 - Nationalism, Culture & Politics Under & After Dictatorship: Spain and Yugoslavia in the 20th Century

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The 20th century histories of Spain and Yugoslavia run surprisingly parallel but have resulted in widely different outcomes. Why? This course analyzes the interaction among nationalism, culture, and politics in both countries through sociological, historical, literary, and visual materials. Special attention is paid to late state-building, the rise of competing nationalisms, civil wars, and their legacies, dictatorship, collective memories, democratic transition (Spain), and state collapse (Yugoslavia.)
    Prerequisites & Notes: Taught in English.
    This course is cross-listed with SOCI 340


  
  • HISP 341 - Inquisitorial Practices: Heretics, Torture & Fear

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Archival dust may cover Inquisition records, but inquisitorial practices that punish deviant behavior are still very much current. This course studies how the Spanish Inquisition (1478-1834) faced social disruptions in Spain and the Americas, and the ways people resisted. We will analyze the roles of torture, fear, and surveillance in early modern and contemporary times through literary, visual and archival materials. One third of the class will take place at the AMAM. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 342 - Spain and Yugoslavia in the 20th Century LxC

    HC ARHU CD
    2 credits
    This is the Spanish-taught discussion section to accompany the team-taught, cross-listed courses HISP/SOCI 340. Only open to students enrolled in the main course with intermediate or higher competency in Spanish. Readings will include novels, short stories, and other primary texts in Spanish.
  
  • HISP 349 - History and Present of the Spanish Language

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course presents Spanish as a living language that has changed and adapted throughout the years. The first part of the course serves as an overview of the diachronic evolution of the Spanish language from its Latin roots, covering topics such as the development of Vulgar Latin and Proto-Romance, the morphology, syntax and phonology of Medieval Castilian, the evolution of the Spanish alphabet, etc. The second part offers a synchronic study of the major regional dialects of Spanish spoken today, and discusses the social factors that determined their distribution. Particular attention will be paid to Peninsular, Caribbean, Andean, Rioplatense, and U.S. Spanish.  Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 350 - Qué flow: Music, Culture, and Politics in Latin America

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course offers a survey of the main trends in 20th and 21st Latin American popular music through an engagement with its cultural and political life. We will study the sexual politics of the bolero (Daniel Santos, La Lupe, Luis Miguel), the relationship between nueva trova (new folk) and the revolutionary politics of the mid-20th century (Silvio Rodríguez, Mercedes Sosa), the diasporic origin of salsa (Celia Cruz, Héctor Lavoe), the emergence and comercialization of “rock en español” (Soda Stereo, Cafe Tauba Aterciopelados), the politics of the “Latin Explosion” of 1999 that offered the “crossover” as global trope (Ricky Martin, Shakira), the emergence of reggaetón (Daddy Yankee, Ivy Queen, Tego Calderón), the recent return to folklore and roots (Natalia Lafourcade), and the linguistic politics of contemporary trap (Bad Bunny, J Balvin). This course is taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 354 - ¡Stop the Presses! Journalism in the Spanish-Speaking World

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course will explore the history and practice of journalism in Latin America as it explores a panoply of issues relating to the continent’s contemporary lived experience. In the process of our inquiry, we will engage questions of the journalist’s neutrality and politicization, matters of censorship and violence, and the ethics of representation. Students will also produce and workshop journalistic writing in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 356 - Latin America in Verse: Poetry, Voice and History

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    An exploration of poetry from Latin America, the Caribbean and Latinx U.S.. This course will offer a thematic survey of 20th century classics (like César Vallejo, Gabriela Mistral, and Vicente Huidrobo) and contemporary poetics (Mayra Santos Fébres, Frank Báez, Karen Peñate, Aracelis Girmay), and will engage with topics such as the relationship between poetry and politics, poetry and race, indigenous poetry, poetry and music, and the uses of history in the poetic imagination. Taught in Spanish. 
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or the equivalent.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 356


  
  • HISP 357 - Memory Battles of the Spanish Civil War: History, Fiction, Photography

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course explores how historiography, fiction, and photography have shaped historical memory in Spain. How has democratic Spain dealt with the legacy of the civil war, the Franco dictatorship, and the Transition? And how have academics, writers, filmmakers, photographers, and journalists engaged with a collective process that is central to the countrys future as a unified, functioning democracy? These questions have unleashed a spirited series of battles in the Spanish public sphere, particularly since the emergence around the year 2000 of the memory movementa grassroots phenomenon that helped prepare the ground for the convulsive changes that have reshaped the countrys political landscape. Taught in English, with optional half-course in Spanish (HISP 358).
  
  • HISP 358 - Memory Battles of the Spanish Civil War: History, Fiction, Photography LxC

    HC ARHU CD WINT
    2 credits
    This Spanish-taught full-semester half course accompanies HISP 357. Open to students enrolled in HISP 357 who have passed HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 359 - Mexican-U.S. American Border Stories

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course examines the different representations of the Mexican-U.S. American border and border subjects in literature, film, music and other artistic expressions from both sides of the border. The course will be organized historically, from the Mexican-American War to contemporary times, and will address issues of nation, politics, identity and binational navigation. Works by Rodolfo Corky Gonzales, Gloria Anzald, Carlos Fuentes, Los Tigres del Norte, and Reyna Grande, among others. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 365 - Love and Death: Jewish Literature and Culture of the Americas

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The iconic arrival at Ellis Island was contemporaneous with mass Jewish immigration throughout the Americas. Framing Jewish literature in multilingual, pan-American context, we will study the deep specificity of texts as well as major themes: alienation, sport, philosophy, comedy and love. Authors include Lispector, Pizarnik, Borges, Chejfec, Roth, Shteyngart, Chabon and more. Optional HISP 366-01 LxC section in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One course in Literature.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 365, JWST 365


  
  • HISP 366 - Love and Death: Jewish Literature and Culture of the Americas LxC

    HC ARHU CD
    2 credits
    The iconic arrival at Ellis Island was contemporaneous with mass Jewish immigration throughout the Americas. Framing Jewish literature in a multilingual, pan-American context, we will study the deep specificity of texts as well as major themes: alienation, sport, philosophy, comedy and love. Authors include Lispector, Pizarnik, Borges, Dropkin, Moscona, Roth, and more. This will be a multi-lingual LxC discussion section, looking at texts from the main course in the original languages together with facing English translation in Spanish, Portuguese, Yiddish and Ladino. Only for students concurrently enrolled in HISP 365, CMPL 365, or JWST 365.
  
  • HISP 402 - Avant-Garde in América: Golems, Anarchists, and Dreamgirls of Popular Theater

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Avant-garde theater and political movements intersected as immigration, labor rights, folklore, and current events were dramatized on stages from New York to Buenos Aires in the 1930s. Cross-cultural characters and storylines of the Depression later made their way into musicals and cinema, and are making a comeback in the Global Recession.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Taught in English (an accompanying Spanish LxC half-course, HISP 403, is also available).
  
  • HISP 404 - Autonomy and Economics in Literature of the Américas

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Self-determination has been the paradoxical crux of American national identities since the continent was named for an Italian financier. We will use autonomy and economy as a conceptual tension framing literatures struggle with inequality and freedom, which in turn invigorates movements that declare capitalism incompatible with democracy. Authors may include Arlt, Echeverr, Deleuze, Dreiser, Hughes, Kant, Leguin, Marcos, Negri, Pauls, Piketty, Sitrin, Spinoza, Steinbeck, Stiglitz, Virno.
    Prerequisites & Notes: One advanced course in the study of literature.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 404


  
  • HISP 408 - Bad Education: Female Instruction in Ibero-America

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course explores the history of women’s access to education in the Spanish-speaking world from the sixteenth-century to the present.  Although patriarchal and Catholic mandates of domesticity and submissiveness historically structured hegemonic female instruction, alternative models always found a way of guaranteeing female access to knowledge, orthodox and unorthodox.  We will study key figures who, through religion, politics, or culture, impacted the formal and informal education of women.  This class will benefit from visits to the Special Collection and the AMAM.  Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 300-Level Literature or Culture course in Spanish.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 408


  
  • HISP 415 - Roberto Bola

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The greatest Latin American novelist of his generation, Roberto Bolao was born in Chile, spent his adolescence in Mico, then wandered throughout the Spanish-speaking world. Everyone he met was a poet, and he turned his friends’ unruly lives into poetic prose. Besides reading his masterpiece Los detectives salvajes, we will read the great Latin American writers who inspired him and a few who enraged him, Borges, Maples Arce, Vallejo, Lihn, Dalton, Zurita, and Paz. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 300-Level Literature or Culture course in Spanish.
  
  • HISP 416 - Constructs of Machismo and Marianismo in the Mexican Literary Canon

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course explores the representation of Machismo (hyper-masculinity) and its counterpart Marianismo (the saintly, maternal and abnegated female) in the Mexican literary canon. We will read works by pioneering female writers Rosario Castellanos, Elena Garro, and Brianda Domecq, as well as contemporary authors Vivian Abenshushan, Guadalupe Nettel, and Ana Clavel. We will analyze how these novelists reformulate stereotypical gender representations and envision alternative conceptualizations of self. We will also examine their interrogations and explorations of the sociohistorical processes of socialization and self-determination. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two Spanish-taught 300-Level Courses.
  
  • HISP 417 - Saints, Sinners and Other Cursed Women

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Between the 16th and 17th centuries, Early Modern Spain and the Spanish Americas increased the regulatory measures that defined women’s behavior regarding virtue and deviance. This seminar studies the tensions between these categories, and the extent to which they determined the ways women in both sides of the Atlantic negotiated, manipulated and circumvented mechanisms of control. Our inquiry will benefit from discussions with students in FREN 455 and visits to the Allen Art Museum. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equaivalent.
  
  • HISP 419 - Big Old Funny Books: Cervantes, Rabelais, Sterne

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    The early modern European novel revels in what the classical epic shunned: learned wit, bodily functions, and something like a comic philosophy of life. This course will read in careful detail (albeit in translation) Rabelaiss Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532-34), Cervantess Don Quixote (1605-15), and Laurence Sternes Tristram Shandy (1759-67). We will examine theories of the novel by Luks and Bakhtin; theories of the comic from Aristotle to Freud; and collateral texts by Borges, Foucault, and Kundera. Bring your own windmills. Taught in English.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or the equivalent.
  
  • HISP 420 - Don Quijote en Espa

    HC ARHU CD
    2 credits
    In this half-course conducted in Spanish, we spend the entire semester reading Don Quijote. Attention will be paid to its context in the Spain of its era, and in translations (including adaptations) of the work. Simultaneous enrollment in the English-language course (HISP 419) is preferred but not required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or the equivalent.
 

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