Apr 23, 2024  
Course Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Course Catalog 2022-2023 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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This is a comprehensive listing of all active, credit-bearing courses offered by Oberlin College and Conservatory since Fall 2016. Courses listed this online catalog may not be offered every semester; for up to date information on which courses are offered in a given semester, please see PRESTO. 

For the most part, courses offered by departments are offered within the principal division of the department. Many interdisciplinary departments and programs also offer courses within more than one division.

Individual courses may be counted simultaneously toward more than one General Course Requirement providing they carry the appropriate divisional attributes and/or designations.

 

Computer Science

  
  • CSCI 343 - Computer and Information Security

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This class will introduce students to fundamental concepts in computer and information security. Topics that may be covered include: threats and vulnerabilities, malicious software, defensive programming techniques, basic cryptography, models of security, auditing, intrusion detection, basic database security, digital rights management, and issues of laws and ethics related to information security. This course is designed to present a broad survey of the field rather than an in depth study of a particular portion.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CSCI 241 required
  
  • CSCI 344 - Privacy, Anonymity and Social Networks

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    In today’s networked and electronic society, personal information and social habits are increasingly available to potentially unauthorized parties. The protection of this information requires balancing social, legal, and economic pressures. This course will introduce students to current research that tackles such privacy challenges in an interdisciplinary approach. We will cover topics such as anonymizing networks, censorship-resistant publishing, location privacy, information sharing in mobile and social networks, electronic voting, and wearable computing. This seminar will be driven by student presentations of papers accompanied by in-depth interactive discussions of the material. Building on knowledge gained in class, students will work on research projects in groups and present their findings at the end of the semester.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CSCI 241
  
  • CSCI 345 - Computers and the Physical World

    FC NSMA QFR


    4 credits
    In this course, we will explore the use of sensors and embedded systems to interact digitally with the physical world. This course will cover topics from embedded systems, the internet of things, and human-computer interaction, including microcontroller programming, hardware and software interface methods, analog and digital sensors, communication protocols, and timers and interrupts, and interface and UX design.

    This is a project-based course in which students will develop microcontroller-based systems that use sensors to observe the physical world, and display the results in creative ways. 

    This course will be open to non StudiOC community students, but preference will be given to students who enroll in both this class and TECH 340OC.  Consent is required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CSCI 150. Consent is required.

  
  • CSCI 353 - Computer Vision

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    An introduction to fundamental concepts, algorithms, and applications of computer vision. Topics include image formation, color spaces, filtering, segmentation, registration, object recognition, tracking, and classification. We will explore the mathematics of computer vision and practice their implementation with programming projects based on real-world data.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CSCI 241: Non-Concurrently
    Corequisite: Math 232 or consent of instructor
  
  • CSCI 364 - Artificial Intelligence

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Artificial intelligence enables computers to independently reason about complex situations in order to make autonomous decisions that achieve the system’s goals.  This course studies popular topics related to computer-based decision-making, including search, constraint satisfaction, Markov decision problems, reinforcement learning, and multiagent systems
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CSCI 241 and CSCI 280
    or consent of instructor.
  
  • CSCI 365 - Advanced Algorithms

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    An advanced theoretical class on algorithms techniques, in which students learn about recent and current research. Topics include approximation algorithms, randomized algorithms, game theory, bioinformatics and linear programming.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MATH 220, CSCI 280 or consent of instructor.
  
  • CSCI 373 - Applied Machine Learning

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Machine learning offers valuable approaches for finding patterns in data that are useful for making predictions, identifying concepts and trends, and understanding relationships.  In this course, students will learn how machine learning operates, along with the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches.  Students will also practice applying machine learning to real-world problems using popular software libraries.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CSCI 151 (Data Structures)
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • CSCI 374 - Machine Learning and Data Mining

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Machine learning and data mining are closely related capabilities that enable computers to learn to perform tasks without explicit programming, as well as discover interesting information from data. This course explores topics within machine learning and data mining, including classification, unsupervised learning, and association rule mining. Students will gain hands-on practice with popular machine learning and data mining algorithms, as well as discuss challenges, issues and solutions to working with complexities in real-world data.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CSCI 241 required, MATH 220 recommended.
  
  • CSCI 381 - Algorithms on Strings, Trees, and Sequences

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    This course presents deterministic algorithms that operate on strings, trees, and sequences. The knowledge of string algorithms is important for information retrieval, text-editing and computational linguistics, but in this course we discuss the algorithms in context of their application to biological sequence analysis. We start by learning classical design techniques for exact and approximate string matching. Next, we learn how we can preprocess large strings into an indexing structure in such a way that it exposes string patterns and makes operations on strings efficient. Finally, we touch upon probabilistic sequence modeling - a powerful modern technique for pattern search.  
    Prerequisites & Notes: CSCI 280 required
  
  • CSCI 383 - Theory of Computation

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This is a course on models of computation and the limits of computability. The first part of the course discusses mathematical models of computation and the problems that can be solved by each model. The second part of the course discusses problems that cannot be solved by any algorithmic process.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CSCI 280 and MATH 220.
  
  • CSCI 384 - Complexity Theory

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    This is a sequel to CSCI 383: Theory of Computation. In CSCI 383 we map out the world in terms of what computers can and cannot do. In this course we classify problems based on the resources that are needed to solve them and how these resources relate to the needs of other problems. We will consider questions such as “How much time or memory does a computer need to solve a problem” “Does randomness help us solve problems faster?” and “If you don’t trust someone, what can they convince you of?”
    Prerequisites & Notes: CSCI 280, and CSCI 383
  
  • CSCI 385 - Economics and Computation

    FC NSMA QFR
    4 credits
    Many important computational platforms intermediate collective decision making or the distribution of resources. Consequently, understanding these algorithmic systems requires an approach informed by economic theory. On the other hand, analyses of economic systems often benefit from an algorithmic perspective. This theoretical course explores how tools from game theory and economics can improve the design of computational systems, and how algorithmic concepts such as worst-case approximation and computational complexity can improve the design and analysis of markets and institutions. Students will both learn new mathematical skills on regular problem sets and understand current research in the area by reading papers. Economics majors taking this course will receive credit for a 300-level ECON elective.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CSCI 280 or consent of instructor.
  
  • CSCI 391 - Diversity and Equity in Computer Science

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    In this seminar, we will discuss current Computer Science education research on ways in which the discipline can be made to be more welcoming to all students (especially traditionally under-served populations such as non-male and non-white/asian students), and ways in which the pedagogical burden can be improved so that those who do not have substantial prior experience with computers can learn optimally. Students will be expected to read, critique, and present on current research in CS education.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CSCI 150
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • CSCI 401F - Honors-Full

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Consent of instructor required.
  
  • CSCI 401H - Honors

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Honors
  
  • CSCI 501F - Research - Full

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Research directed by faculty member. Interested students are encouraged to talk to individual faculty members about possible projects. Consent required.
  
  • CSCI 501H - Research - Half

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Research directed by faculty member. Interested students are encouraged to talk to individual faculty members about possible projects. Consent required.
  
  • CSCI 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC NSMA
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • CSCI 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC NSMA
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Creative Writing

  
  • CRWR 110 - Introduction to Writing Poetry

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This introductory course features the extensive reading and discussion of poetry from a creative writing perspective. In the weekly writing exercises students will be given the opportunity to apply the techniques they have learned from the assigned readings. Later in the term there will be workshops of student work.
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course is primarily for first years. Second year students may be considered during add/drop.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CRWR 120 - Introduction to Fiction Writing

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    Intensive reading of diverse works of contemporary fiction, teaching students how to read like writers and to articulate and employ common elements of fiction craft. Writing includes numerous exercises, which explore the fictional techniques seen in published stories and discussed in class, as well as complete short stories. Small group workshops, led by TAs and prioritizing peer feedback, meet regularly to discuss student work.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Primarily for first years. Upper division students may be considered during add/drop.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CRWR 140 - Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    Intensive reading of diverse works of contemporary nonfiction, teaching students how to read like writers and to articulate and employ common elements of the craft of creative nonfiction. Writing includes numerous exercises, which explore the literary techniques seen in published work and discussed in class, as well as complete short essays. The work written and discussed may be formally adventurous, but will always remain true to the principles of nonfiction. Small group workshops, led by TAs and prioritizing peer feedback, meet regularly to discuss student work. Prerequisites & Notes: Primarily for first years. Upper division students may be considered during add/drop, though RHET 207: Literary Journalism may be a more suitable class for them.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • CRWR 195 - The Practice of Writing

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    The Practice of Writing is for students at all levels of the College and Con who wish to explore and deepen their commitment to writing and understanding of craft by completing a rigorous series of daily exercises. Each week, students will attend a discussion about an element of craft, focusing on diverse texts that exemplify and complicate that theme. Students will then complete a targeted series of five exercises (one for each day of the work week) related to that theme, and meet in regularly assigned small groups with their TA (and the professor, on a rotating schedule) to discuss individual and the group’s responses to the exercises.
  
  • CRWR 206 - Digital Storytelling

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    While storytellers have for centuries composed narratives through oral and print media, emerging digital media allow increasing possibilities to develop and share narratives using text, audio, visual, and video. This course will explore the evolving iterations of digital storytelling including web comics, podcasts, Powerpoint stories, Twitter stories, hypertext fiction, and YouTube. Students will do a close study of the craft behind these digital narratives, and experiment in different mediums through writing exercises and a creative portfolio.
  
  • CRWR 207 - Literary Journalism

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    From New Journalism to the personal essay, literary techniques are reshaping the way journalists write about sports, nature, politics, science, and the arts. This course will explore the way journalists use the tools of fiction and poetry in their writing while remaining true to the standards of reporting. Students will balance the reading of literary journalism and essays with time spent crafting their own writing.
    This course is cross-listed with WRCM 207


  
  • CRWR 208 - Queer Futures

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course explores how the project of self-making often gets bound up with the project of world-making in queer literature. Class texts range from theory to speculative fiction to autobiography, with attention to why queer work often invites collisions between genres. Readings will be the basis for semi-weekly writing assignments, plus a larger project to be workshopped. This class will invite students, in their writing, to imagine a future world for a future self, to imagine the end to racial and gendered hierarchies and resource extraction, to imagine queer love in the wreckage, or simply to create something new.
  
  • CRWR 210 - Fiction Workshop

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    An intermediate writing workshop, focused on the craft of fiction. Extensive reading of published short fiction and essays on the craft of writing. Student work will be new, original stories produced for peer review, as well as regular, shorter writing exercises that explore craft and technique. At the end of the term, students will submit a final portfolio.
  
  • CRWR 212 - Word & Image: Poetry in Dialogue with Visual Art

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This class will explore various ways poets both employ poetic images and are inspired by visual images, including those made by artists. Our texts for discussion will be a wide range of traditional and contemporary poems written in dialogue with visual art. Weekly writing assignments will engage imaginatively with visual art, including works at the Allen Art Museum. This course has no prerequisite except an interest in both art forms.
  
  • CRWR 213 - The Prose Poem

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    The prose poem-with prose looks and poetic sensibilities-is a form born of rebellion and experimentation at the crossroads of two genres.  We will study the prose poem’s origins, history, and contemporary practice in order to understand how narrative, poetics, and syntax function in this form.  To develop our craft sensibilities, we will read and discuss prose poems across time, cultures, and aesthetics. We will produce our own creative work in the genre. 
  
  • CRWR 214 - The Poetry of Place

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course examines the role of place in shaping poetry writing. Students will actively engage with the local environment of N.E. Ohio’s natural landscape, agriculture, history, industry, and community to develop a sense of place.  Weekly writing assignments reflect on the intersection between language and the environments we inhabit.  Classic and contemporary texts will help us chart the changing relationship among nature, self, and community. Field trips required.
  
  • CRWR 214OC - The Poetry of Place

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course examines the role of place in shaping poetry writing. Students will actively engage with the local environment of N.E. Ohio’s natural landscape, agriculture, history, industry, and community to develop a sense of place.  Weekly writing assignments reflect on the intersection between language and the environments we inhabit.  Classic and contemporary texts will help us chart the changing relationship among nature, self, and community.  This course is part of the Fieldwork: The Art of Place StudiOC learning community. Field trips required.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • CRWR 215 - Race and Poetic Innovation

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course will explore the relationship between racial identity and creative inventiveness with particular attention to texts that experiment with poetic techniques in order to broaden and challenge notions of race and representation. Students will read contemporary poetry that serves as a model for student writing and participate in an engaged workshop community.
  
  • CRWR 216 - 4x4: Studies in the Contemporary Short Story

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    In this reading- and writing-intensive class, students will study short fiction by four current practitioners of the form: Ottessa Moshfegh, Carmen Maria Machado, Nafissa Thompson-Spires, and Joy Williams. Students will examine the range of voices, techniques, formal strategies, and representations of identity these authors employ. By experimenting with some of these same approaches in theirown fiction, studentswill expand their range in the short story form. Theclass features close readings, discussion, group work, exercises, formal assignments, and workshop.
  
  • CRWR 217 - Climate Fiction

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    In this course, students will be introduced to the growing field of Climate Fiction. They will read sample works by a diverse array of contemporary authors, and study how environmental concepts are explored across different literary genres. Through short exercises, students will also practice engaging with environmental themes, concepts, and questions in their own fiction, building toward longer workshopped pieces. This course will culminate with a portfolio of revised creative work.
    Sustainability
  
  • CRWR 218 - The Art of the Monologue: One-Person Plays and Other Solo (Non)Fictions

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    A writing workshop on the first-person voice, whether the text is intended for the page or the stage. From performed autobiography (or autobiographical fictions) to solo-performer journalistic inquiries to the inner narratives of Modern (and Postmodern) fiction to Moth-style storytelling, we will examine great monologues across multiple genres. Student work will be new, original responses to writing exercises, working toward a staged reading of an original one-act monologue. Possible readings may include Samuel Beckett, Whoopi Goldberg, Wallace Shawn, Anna Deveare Smith, Edgar Allen Poe, and EM Lewis, among others.
  
  • CRWR 222 - Speculative Fiction

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    The power of the speculative is not only to stretch our imaginations, but to make us question and challenge what we take for granted in the very world we live in. In this course, we will explore traditional craft, such as character, setting, and tone, within the mode of the speculative and fantastic, including science fiction, Afrofuturism, magical realism, surrealism, fairy tales, and mythic retellings. This class will require intensive creative output, both within and outside traditional workshop structures.
  
  • CRWR 230 - Form and Flexibility

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This course will examine a variety of traditional poetic forms and the flexible ways contemporary writers employ them. Students will be expected to read closely and intensively from a writer’s point of view, write a poem each week exploring the form discussed, and participate constructively in workshops.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Open to non-majors; no application required.
  
  • CRWR 235 - Story & Screen

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    Why are some literary works successfully adapted to a film or television format, and not others? In this course, we will read from diverse short stories, novels, and works of nonfiction to understand the narrative mechanics that make a work of literature particularly suited for cinematic expression. Through short exercises and a longer workshopped narrative, students will practice a variety of concepts as they work toward an end-of-semester portfolio of creative work. 
  
  • CRWR 238 - Topics and Forms; Plot and Structure

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    Through analysis of and creative response to diverse, international modern and contemporary novels and short stories, students will gain an understanding of the historical and logical basis of plot and narrative structure. Simultaneously, students will learn to question established rules about managing plot and action, and to think deeply about structuring their own creative narratives. This course will require in-depth reading, weekly reading responses (some critical, some creative), and regular, timely submission of students own fiction for consideration in workshop, as well as a substantial end-of-semester portfolio.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Any 100 or 200-Level CRWR course, or equivalent experience with instructor permission.
  
  • CRWR 241 - Queer Poetry

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    What’s queer about poetry–historically, currently, and inherently? In this course, we will consider contemporary collections by LGBTQ poets and also read a number of historical poems through a queer lens. Weekly poem prompts, which incorporate relevant topics in gender and sexuality, will focus on craft experimentation.
  
  • CRWR 245 - Urgent Nature: Ecopoetics & Nature Poetry

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    The traditional approach to nature and pastoral poetry has been sharply redefined in recent decades as writers reckon with species extinction, environmental degradation, and climate change. In this course, students will read and write poems that examine the complicated relationship between humans and nature. Through discussion, reading, and generative exercises, students will examine their own relationship to the environment while considering how writing can reflect the mysteries of the natural world while ethically advancing environmental awareness.
    Sustainability
  
  • CRWR 248 - Climate Nonfiction

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course will focus on the creative nonfiction of climate change. As writers, scholars, and ordinary citizens, some of the immediate challenges we face include how to document what’s happening, how to depict scientific research for a general readership, and how we can make use of nonfiction storytelling techniques to better understand how we got here, where we are now, and all the possible futures to which humanity might be headed. Students will read recent published work on the climate crisis, including long-form journalistic essays, memoir, and more formally uncategorizable writing. Student writing will include exercises and longer nonfiction assignments, submitted for and discussed in workshop.
    Sustainability
  
  • CRWR 250 - Introduction to Literary Translation: Theory, History, Practice

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    The gateway to translation studies at Oberlin, this course is an introduction to the history and theory of literary translation. Focusing on culturally significant examples, students will examine linguistic, stylistic, political, economic, philosophical, and technological aspects of translation. Emphasis will be placed on the historical evolution of the roles of translators and translations and on how translation has shaped literary culture since the Renaissance. Topics will include genre and cross-genre translation (fiction, poetry, and drama), issues of translatability and translation strategy, and the impact of translations on untranslated writing.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 250


  
  • CRWR 256 - Historic(al) Fictions

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    In this 200-level Creative Writing course, students will read two kinds of texts: historical works of fiction that invented or popularized elements of craft we now take for granted, and contemporary historical fictions of diverse kinds, particularly those that explore the history of technology, work, and innovation. Students will also have the opportunity to write historical fiction of their own for workshop review. Weekly reading responses, creative work due on an established schedule, and completion of substantive final work will be important elements of the course.
  
  • CRWR 273 - False Documents: Fiction, Fakery, and Other Falsehoods

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    A false document is ‘a technique employed to create verisimilitude in a work of fiction.’ This can take many forms, such as epistolary novels, or fictions in the form of annotated poems, online reviews, author acknowledgements, wills, indexes, email threads, and beyond. How do we perceive verisimilitude as readers? How do we, as writers, fake it? In addition to examining literary false documents (and hoaxes and frauds), students will write a number of short fictions over the course of the semester. All will be original, new texts, of the students’ exclusive authorship, although they may not be presented as such.
  
  • CRWR 280 - Small Prose Forms

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This class will explore a number of miniature prose genres–including prose poetry, tales, flash fiction, and nonfiction shorts. Through the reading and discussion of published texts, the class will analyze the structural elements of these forms. The writing assignments will give students the opportunity to practice the techniques they have learned. In workshop discussions, students will apply what they have learned to the constructive criticism of work by their peers.
    Prerequisites & Notes: No application required
  
  • CRWR 284 - Subject and Object: Poetry as Fact and Feeling

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    For centuries, poems have been understood as vehicles of spontaneous feeling, of grief, or love, or longing. At the same time, they know themselves to be art objects: planned, plotted, and made. Through reading, writing, and rigorous revision, students will consider how poems negotiate the tensions between subjective experience and objective reality, between feeling and fact, between artifice and authenticity.
  
  • CRWR 285 - Strangeness and Surprise

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    Poems are strange things. Whether free or formal, they emerge when unnatural patterns or limits (such as lines, meters, rhyme-schemes) are imposed on language. They can surprise, delight, estrange, or surprise readers. Students will study examples of poetic innovation, oddity, and weirdness, and through their own writing will explore and practice techniques for refreshing and renewing poetic speech.
  
  • CRWR 286 - Borderlands: Literary Fiction and its Subgenres

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    Mid and late twentieth-century literary fiction tended toward a realist focus, but today, some of our most interesting literary writers employ material and styles once relegated to other genres (horror, suspense, mystery, sci-fi, comics, etc.). Borderlands examines the relationships between these genres and subgenres by introducing students to a wide variety of contemporary authors. Students will write exercises and short stories to explore the lessons they’ve learned, which the class will then discuss in a workshop setting.
  
  • CRWR 287 - Voice, Mood, and Tone

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    All of us have experienced tonal differences between literary works, but how do we describe them and come to understand how and why writers make specific choices about conveying their subject matter? What might an author gain or lose by choosing to tell her story in the first person or a limited third person? This course introduces students to diverse contemporary authors as it disambiguates literary voice, mood, and tone from one another and explores the choices authors make about using them. Through imitative exercises and longer, workshopped pieces students will try out multiple ways to tell their own stories.
  
  • CRWR 291 - Topics & Forms: The OuLiPo & Constraint

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    In this 200-level course, students read works by members of the OuLiPo (Ouvroir de littérature potentielle, or Workshop of Potential Literature), a movement that uses math-based constraints to create experimental literary works; students then engage with questions about the differences between such voluntary constraints and those society and culture impose on writers. Students write original works using Oulipian and non-Oulipian constraints. All texts will be taught in English translation, though students with working knowledge of French, Italian, or Arabic can also read texts in the original languages. This course is cross-referenced with CMPL.      
  
  • CRWR 310 - Poetry Workshop

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This workshop, which focuses on the writing of poetry, features intensive discussion of student work and the assigned reading. Students will be expected to write at least one new poem every week.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CRWR 300-level courses are primarily for majors and aspiring minors. At minimum, the prerequisite to apply is satisfactory completion of two 200-level CRWR courses. Applications to all 300s are typically due mid-semester the semester before the class; majors fill out the “300-level preference form,” while aspiring majors and minors, and all other applicants, apply to the course with a portfolio. All 300s are consent only.
  
  • CRWR 311 - Advanced Poetry Workshop 2: Special Topics in Poetry

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    For Fall 2020, this course will focus on various structures and strategies of poetic sequences and book-length poems. Topics that may be the focus in other semesters include: advanced approaches to prosody, new and traditional poetic forms, docupoetics, and hybrid/cross-genre forms.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Successful completion of two 200-level CRWR courses. Admission based on a completed application and a writing sample. See Blackboard for deadlines and to download the form.
  
  • CRWR 317 - Between Lyric and Narrative: Transitional Prose Forms

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    In this course, we will look at free verse narratives, prose poems, lyric vignettes, short shorts, and modulator prose forms. Readings will be selected from a diverse group of contemporary writers. The weekly writing exercises will require creative responses in the forms being studied, building over the course of the term to longer prose narratives. A portfolio of 4-5 shorter pieces, a mid-length piece, and a longer narrative will be required at the end of term.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Please see the introductory material in the catalog for a description of prerequisites. Prior acceptance to the major or an application with an appropriate work sample are required for admission to this course. Applications should be submitted to the CRWR office in Peters 205 by 12 noon on the last day of classes. Check the program webpage for details. Any student who has completed two 200-Level Creative Writing courses or who has completed one 100-Level course, one 200-Level course, and is in the process of completing a second 200-Level course may apply for 300- and 400-Level courses. Students accepted into the major will be guaranteed access to sufficient upper-Level courses to complete the major. For CRWR 350 and 351, students who have declared the Concentration in Literary Translation will have the same priority as majors in CRWR and CMPL. Other qualified students for all upper-Level courses will be accommodated whenever possible. Assignments to courses are made by a committee of Creative Writing faculty. In creating course rosters, the committee will consider, along with student preferences, the diversity of the classes and the pedagogical benefits of students working with a variety of instructors. Details about the timeline for admission, as well as the application forms, are available on the Creative Writing site on Blackboard.
  
  • CRWR 320 - Fiction Workshop

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This workshop on the writing of short fiction includes intensive discussion of student work and of the assigned reading. Students will be expected to turn in weekly responses to the readings and to the creative prompts, as well as more completed works of fiction at regular, assigned intervals. A substantial portfolio of completed work will be due at the end of term. Admission based on a completed application due in the Program Office on the last day of classes of the previous semester. See Blackboard for deadlines and to download forms.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CRWR 300-level courses are primarily for majors and aspiring minors. At minimum, the prerequisite to apply is satisfactory completion of two 200-level CRWR courses. Applications to all 300s are typically due mid-semester the semester before the class; majors fill out the “300-level preference form,” while aspiring majors and minors, and all other applicants, apply to the course with a portfolio. All 300s are consent only.
  
  • CRWR 321 - Special Topics in Fiction: The Sentence

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    This 300-level fiction workshop focuses on the sentence: how diverse writers (including those in the class) construct it and use it, to varying effect. Readings will include multiple books about sentences and grammar, as well as a variety of contemporary short fiction writers who write and use sentences in unique, persuasive ways. Workshops in this course will primarily go line by line and sentence by sentence, analyzing the micro choices student writers make in their pieces. (We will look at the big picture too – but secondarily.)
    Prerequisites & Notes: Like all 300-level CRWR courses, admission to 321 is by application (these are typically due before midterms the previous semester) and instructor consent. Majors who still need to fulfill some of their 300-level requirements can simply state this course on their preference form; minors and aspiring majors need to fill out an application. Please note that the minimum prerequisite for all 300-level CRWR courses is the successful completion of two 200-level CRWR courses.
  
  • CRWR 322 - Speculative Fiction

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    The power of the speculative not only stretches our imagination but challenges what we take for granted in the very world we live in. This advanced workshop will encourage you to write and experiment in a range of modes including science fiction, Afrofuturism, magical realism, surrealism, fairy tales, and mythic retellings. By closely reading seminal and more modern works, we will analyze traditional craft techniques, such as character, theme, and exposition, through the lens of the speculative and fantastic. A portfolio of revised work will be required at the end of term.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Like all 300-level CRWR courses, admission to 322 is by application (due before fall break) and instructor consent. Majors who still need to fulfill some of their 300-level requirements can simply state this course on their preference form; minors and aspiring majors need to fill out an application. Please note that this course focuses on English grammar and syntax. Students with no prior exposure to or interest in these topics may find the learning curve steep.
  
  • CRWR 323 - Experiments in Narrative Fiction

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This course is interested in narratives that bend, swerve, break, and recombine, sometimes with the goal of remaking old narratives, inserting characters into stories where they don’t belong, or combining fiction with cultural criticism. Students will read experimental, hybrid, and autofictional works, with attention to the distinction among these traditions. Through generative exercises and longer projects for workshop, students will play with incorporating genres like poetics, theory, history, and fantasy into narrative fiction, and maybe even abandon narrative entirely in favor of fragmented, essayistic, or other forms.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Like all 300-level CRWR courses, admission to 321 is by application (these are typically due before midterms the previous semester) and instructor consent. Majors who still need to fulfill some of their 300-level requirements can simply state this course on their preference form; minors and aspiring majors need to fill out an application. Please note that the minimum prerequisite for all 300-level CRWR courses is the successful completion of two 200-level CRWR courses.
  
  • CRWR 332 - Song and Book

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    The lyric poem has always had a close but mysterious relationship to music and song. This course will investigate these relationships by reading and writing the lyrics, both in the poetic and musical sense of the word. Writing will include interpretive analysis and poetic exercises.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Either the Prerequisites for English 300-Level or the CRWR 300-Level courses or by consent of the instructor.
    This course is cross-listed with ENGL 332


  
  • CRWR 340 - Nonfiction Workshop

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    The writing of personal narratives, with an emphasis on nonfiction as a literary art form. Students will read work by modern and contemporary authors with an eye toward understanding the variety of modes which come under the current heading ‘creative nonfiction’ (memoir, meditation, travel, cultural critique, profile), and will be asked to employ a number of these methods and approaches in their own work.
    Prerequisites & Notes: CRWR 300-level courses are primarily for majors and aspiring minors. At minimum, the prerequisite to apply is satisfactory completion of two 200-level CRWR courses. Applications to all 300s are typically due mid-semester the semester before the class; majors fill out the “300-level preference form,” while aspiring majors and minors, and all other applicants, apply to the course with a portfolio. All 300s are consent only.
  
  • CRWR 341 - Lyric Essay

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    The lyric essay is a chimera - part poetry and part prose, part tame and part feral. It is an outlier, a rebel, a wild flight into liminal space. In this course, students will read and write lyric essays that experiment and play with form, structure, and content. Through discussion, reading, and generative exercises, students will explore many different approaches to writing lyric essays, including juxtaposition, collage, braids, and untethered, associative thinking.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Completion of 2 200-level CRWR classes or acceptance into CRWR Major
  
  • CRWR 350 - Advanced Translation Workshop: Poetry

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    In this course we will study literary translation of poetry at the advanced level. Students will translate a body of work by a single author. While the course will focus on workshopping translations, we will also read some theory and craft essays by translators of poetry.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Four semesters of language or equivalent, and CMPL/CRWR 250 or equivalent.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 350


  
  • CRWR 351 - Advanced Translation Workshop: Prose and Drama

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    In this course we will study literary translation of prose and drama at the advanced level. Students will translate a body of work by a single author and write a critical introduction to their translation. While the course will focus on workshopping translations, we will also read theory and essays by translators of prose and drama.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Four semesters of language or the equivalent.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 351


  
  • CRWR 365 - Cinematic Storytelling Workshop

    FC ARHU WINT
    4 credits
    This introductory screenwriting course explores the roles of narrative in cinema. To better understand what cinematic stories are and how they work, students will explore basic principles, methods, and techniques for composing them, paying special attention to character development and narrative structure. In addition to reading published screenplays and watching selected films, they will create their own original short screenplays.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Recommended preparation: CINE 290
    This course is cross-listed with CINE 295


  
  • CRWR 450 - Teaching Imaginative Writing

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    A course for writers and aspiring teachers who want to learn how to teach imaginative writing in meaningful and effective ways in the elementary and secondary classroom. In the first half of the semester, students will examine issues of poetics, community engagement, and pedagogy, while preparing and workshopping their own original lesson plans. In the second half of the semester, students will participate in residencies at Langston Middle School.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites & Notes: Admission based on a completed application and a writing sample.
    Community Based Learning
  
  • CRWR 485 - Practicum

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    This course is open to students who are interested in acquiring practical, writing-related skills by working on a literary journal, organizing a reading series, editing a student anthology, assisting with introductory Creative Writing courses, organizing community- or campus-based workshops, helping out with the Creative Writing Student Co-op, or working on other program approved projects. Students can earn a maximum of four credit hours toward the major.
    Community Based Learning
  
  • CRWR 486 - Writers in the Schools Practicum

    HC ARHU WINT
    2 credits
    The WITS (Writers-in-the-Schools) Practicum provides students who have successfully completed CRWR 450: Teaching Imaginative Writing an opportunity to continue working in the local schools by planning and conducting special projects and residencies. Students in the WITS Practicum will meet weekly in a seminar setting to workshop teaching plans and ideas, and their work in the schools will be supervised by the instructor. Collaborative and interdisciplinary projects are welcome.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Completion of CRWR 450: Teaching Imaginative Writing and consent of the instructor. Admission based on a completed application and a writing sample. See Blackboard for deadlines and to download forms.
    Community Based Learning
  
  • CRWR 490 - Creative Writing Capstone Seminar

    FC ARHU WADV
    4 credits
    Creative Writing majors in their senior year complete a capstone project as part of the capstone seminar. The capstone project is a body of carefully considered creative work of 20-35 pages of poetry, 25-50 pages of prose, or 25-50 pages of a play or screenplay. A combination of peer workshops and occasional one-on-one conferences with the instructor facilitates the development of independent project planning, writing, and revision. Regular group meetings consist of seminars on topics related to craft and creative process, as well as discussions on life after college and the translation of skills gained in the program to both literary and non-literary careers.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Instructor consent; students generally complete capstones after completion of three 300-Level workshops.
  
  • CRWR 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • CRWR 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Dance

  
  • DANC 100 - Contemporary Dance I-Beginning

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Contemporary I is an introduction to basic physical/intellectual principles of contemporary dance technique with an emphasis on the development of the body as an instrument of expression. Elements of improvisation, composition and partnering will be explored. The course will culminate in a short collaborative group project.
    Prerequisites & Notes: May be repeated for credit. Students on the wait list must attend the first class meeting in order to be considered for any openings. During the initial registration period, limited numbers of class seats are reserved for each class: first thru fifth year students. During the add/drop period, consent of instructor is required.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • DANC 107 - Samba

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to Samba. Deeply enmeshed with Brazil’s colonial history Samba has arisen as a symbol of its cultural and national identity. With dance as our foci, this course will offer an embodied exploration of the racial and cultural mixing at Samba’s root through a study of physical techniques, aesthetics, rhythms and ideology. We will also study the music, history, traditions and socio-cultural context surrounding the dance through readings, videos and discussions.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • DANC 113 - Ballet I

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Introduction to classical ballet with an emphasis on alignment, injury prevention, and expression.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Students on the waitlist must attend the first class meeting in order to be considered for any openings. May be repeated for credit.
  
  • DANC 120 - Bharata Natyam (Classical Indian Dance)

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Bharata Natyam is a classical dance form from the southern state of Tamil Nadu, India. This dance course will introduce students to the three components that make up Bharata Natyam: nritta (abstract movement), nritya (movement that conveys a narrative), and natya (combination of nritta and nritya - drama). Within these three components, students will learn the basic postures, movements, and choreographic principles of the Thanjavur style of Bharata Natyam. Through readings, viewings, and written assignments, students will examine the historical, cultural, and socio-political contexts that shape Bharata Natyam as a global practice. The course is open to all levels of experience and will give students the opportunity to develop their Bharata Natyam technique and performance skills at an individual level.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • DANC 132 - Contact Improvisation

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    The many points of contact between people – visual, physical, rhythmic, emotional – set up the meeting ground for dancing in Contact Improvisation. In this class we will acquire the physical skills (such as rolling, learning when to give weight, and how to fall safely) and improvisational mindset (how to focus on sensation and give up expectations) needed to facilitate a conscious, engaged dancing with one another. Over the course of the semester, we will cultivate a responsive body, one that is capable both of resistance and resilience as we learn to touch one another with intention and thoughtfulness.
    Prerequisites & Notes: May be repeated for credit. During the add/drop period, consent of instructor required.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • DANC 161 - Capoeira Angola I

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Capoeira Angola is the African-Brazilian martial art that combines dance, music, and combat to create a game of strategy, style and wit. This course will introduce students to the aspects of Capoeira Angola including the movement, music, philosophy and history traced through great masters of the past to its African beginnings in the Bantu’s dance of N’golo. Each class will involve daily physical training and music lessons. Students will also engage in readings and discussions aimed at providing a historic context for contemporary styles and traditions.
    This course is cross-listed with AAST 161


  
  • DANC 180 - Hip Hop Dance I - Beginning

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Hip Hop is a form of dance that is both highly visible and highly contested in American culture.  In this introductory dance class, students will find and refine their own physical voices through warm-ups, combinations, group work, and freestyle sessions.  Classes are structured to help students build their physical endurance while also exploring the origins and cultural contexts of hip hop.  Together we will interrogate what it means to participate in the culture and performance of hip hop dance, especially in a U.S. academic context. No previous experience in dance necessary.  
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • DANC 190 - West African Dance Forms I

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals and basic movements of West African Dance. Traditional dance and rhythmic structures of Senegal, Gambia, Guinea, and Mali will be studied to develop skills in beginning African Dance. Culture, history and philosophy of West African dance will also be explored through song, music, performance and academic discourse. This class will be taught from a traditional West African perspective and Pan-African world view in the context of their social, occupational, and religious functions.
    This course is cross-listed with AAST 190


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • DANC 191 - West African Dance Forms II

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course is an expansion to the fundamentals, basic movements, forms, and techniques explored in African Dance I. Traditional dance and rhythmic structures of Senegal, Gambia, Guinea and Mali will be studied in depth to develop skills in advanced African Dance. This class will be explored in total context with traditional costuming, music, culture and customs. This class will be taught from a traditional West African perspective and African world view. Students will perform in a final culminating studio concert.
    Prerequisites & Notes: DANC/AAST 190 or previous dance experience.
    This course is cross-listed with AAST 191


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • DANC 199 - Dance Forms–African Diaspora

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course is designed to promote and develop creativity in dance performance of new works through the African-American experience. This course will explore the history, development, and core elements of dance forms of the African Diaspora: Modern Fusion, Afro-beat, Soukous, and Hip-Hop.
  
  • DANC 199H - Dance Forms–African Diaspora

    HC ARHU CD
    2 credits
    This course is designed to promote and develop creativity in dance performance of new works through the African-American experience. This course will explore the history, development, and core elements of dance forms of the African Diaspora: Modern Fusion, Afro-beat, Soukous, and Hip-Hop.
    This course is cross-listed with AAST 199H


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • DANC 200 - Contemporary Dance II-Intermediate

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    A continuation of dance technique for those who have successfully completed DANC 100 or the equivalent.
  
  • DANC 202 - Mind-Body Practices: An Introduction to Somatics

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This movement-based class introduces students to somatic practices designed to support our bodies in both dance and everyday contexts. Movement exercises in breathwork, core control, alignment, stability, mobility and balance encourage musculoskeletal exploration and awareness. Much of the course is informed by the Pilates method but students will have the opportunity to learn about a range of other somatic practices and traditions.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • DANC 203 - Somatic Landscapes

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Somatic Landscapes begins with the premise that we live in the world through our bodies. Thus, if we want to become conscious of our relationship to the earth we must first become mindful of our physical selves. In order to develop our responsibility to the ecology, we must first develop an ability to respond. This course takes place at the intersections of Nature/Culture; Art/Science; Body/Mind; Self/Other. We will call on all the usual academic resources reading, writing, analyzing and discussing but extend beyond these to include sensing, feeling, and moving in order to cultivate a curiosity about our world.
  
  • DANC 204 - Physical Mindfulness

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    In this course we will explore a number of body/mind practices (including yoga, authentic movement, Body-Mind Centering and improvisational dance) in order to become more aware of how we live in the world through our bodies. Recognizing that how we move both reflects and affects how we think about the world, we will bring attention and intention to our experiences of embodiment, as well as our relations with other people and with our environment.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • DANC 205 - Somatic Studies: The Anatomy of Innovation

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    The discipline of somatic studies, Somatics coming from the Greek word soma, meaning ‘the body in its wholeness’ underscores the indivisibility of body and mind. It defies dualism and strives to improve embodied self-awareness. This course will introduce students to broad somatic principles as they explore the history, theory, and practice of three fundamental somatic modalities: Sweigard Ideokinesis, Alexander Technique, and Bartenieff Fundamentals. Experiential learning sessions will offer opportunities for students to deepen perceptual capabilities and physical sentience. During the semester, an increase of ease, efficiency, and facility of movement, as well as expressivity, will be developed.
  
  • DANC 207 - Improvisation in Dance and Mind

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    As a practice of facing the unknown, improvisation can help us survive the disorientation of our chaotic contemporary world. Learning to open ourselves to the possibilities that exceed our expectations (of who we are and what we can accomplish) can be both personally useful and politically profound. In this class, we will stretch our bodies and our imaginations, asking “what if?” instead of “what is?”  We will also have fun.
    Prerequisites & Notes: DANC 100 or DANC 200 or equivalent dance experience.
  
  • DANC 209 - Improvisation 1

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Improvisation I is an introduction to the discovery and cultivation of spontaneous movement in solo, duet and group forms. Through guided movement exercises, observations, readings, and discussions, students will broaden self-awareness while increasing physical prowess and expressivity. We will attend to time, space, energy, and shape while spontaneously composing movement, through which students will explore their relationship to self, others, space, environment and sensation. 
  
  • DANC 211 - Production Project

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Independent individual or collaborative work based in performance. Open to dancers, musicians, poets, designers, etc. Project leader must determine details of project in conjunction with a faculty sponsor.
    Prerequisites & Notes: May be repeated for a total of six credits. Please note certain sections are for letter grade, others are P/NP.
  
  • DANC 214 - Moving into Community

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    What does it mean to engage ones citizenship as a dancer? This course will introduce students to a variety of movement projects within the Oberlin community. We will look at both historical precedents and contemporary examples of choreographers such as David Dorfman, Liz Lerman, and Jawole Willa Jo Zollar of Urban Bush Women in order to explore the issues of social power and cultural work involved in community-based teaching and performance.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
    Community Based Learning
  
  • DANC 221 - Body Re-education and Functional Anatomy

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This course focuses on the relationship of mind and body in affecting physical change to re-educate and align the body. Students will explore functional anatomy through readings and movement sessions as well as analyzing personal alignment and movement patterns. A body-based language describing and analyzing movement, anatomy, and imagery is used in the movement sessions. Readings are assigned.
    Prerequisites & Notes: DANC 100 or DANC113. Students on the wait list must attend the first class meeting in order to be considered for any openings.
  
  • DANC 222 - Choreography I

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    This class focuses on methods of generating material and shaping movement phrases toward the creation of solos and small group dances. Weekly studies are assigned, exploring the use of space, gesture, dynamics, rhythm, shape and texture. Methods of composition include use of improvisation as well as an introduction to the basic forms of theme and variation, canon and repetition. Readings, discussions and performances are required.
  
  • DANC 223 - Choreographing Catastrophe

    HC ARHU


    2 credits
    This course will look at choreographic responses to cataclysmic events both global and personal. It will include weekly video viewings of historic and contemporary works navigating wars, social upheaval, health crisis and personal tragedies through dance. It will also include discussion and movement studies inspired by the viewings and our own circumstances.

    No previous dance experience or knowledge required

  
  • DANC 224 - Beginning Choreography in Cultural Traditions

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This class focuses on the study of choreography, cultural traditions, performance, and participation in the mounting of traditional dance works from inception through rehearsal to performance. Weekly Readings are assigned, exploring the use of space, ritual, rhythm, shape and culture. Classes will emphasize the creative process and the working, artistic relationship between the choreographer and dancers. Repertory rehearsals are geared to enrich and develop personal expression and performance skills in a class setting in order that the final choreographic work is a dynamic experience for both group and individual performance. Readings, discussions and performances are required.
    Prerequisites & Notes: DANC/AAST 190 or 191
    This course is cross-listed with AAST 224


  
  • DANC 225 - Social Justice in Dance

    FC ARHU CD


    4 credits
    This course will explore the universal language of movement to generate relevant conversations while creating dance works around social justice issues in our communities. Students will apply the creative and critical analysis process to communicate feelings, ideas and understandings in response to a variety of text, film, spoken word and dance works surrounding global communal issues and experiences. The class will exercise solidarity through group work, exchanging of ideas, engaging in intentional discussion and raising awareness of social justice issues through dance. Students will participate in guided dance explorations and small group choreography to generate emotion and movements while learning to use dance as an aesthetic instrument of change and using the body as an archive. This class will focus on community centered inquiry and five principles of Social Justice; Equity, Access, Participation, Diversity and Human Rights

    Class will include and/or culminate with performance.
    This course is cross-listed with AAST 225


  
  • DANC 237 - Immersive Dance Theater

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    This course helps prepare students who want to pursue a professional career in dance acquire the myriad of practical skills to “make it” in the dance world. This will include: grant writing, mission statements, budgets and finance, company and independent artist models, theater production skills (lighting, tech riders, production schedules, etc.), marketing and advertising, press kits/releases, and more. Students will be able to tailor class assignments to their dance trajectory.
  
  • DANC 239 - Site Specific Dance

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Students will study the work of numerous artists working in the genre of site-specific dance and explore the wide variety of ways artists attend to place through the body and movement. Students will follow their interests – environmental, architectural, agricultural, historical, aesthetic – to drive their art-making. We will spend significant time at our sites of choice developing structures and movement vocabularies inspired by and responsive to each specific place. By resisting the temptation to make dances in the studio and transfer them to a site, students will learn how the essence of a place, discovered through sensory information, uniquely imbues dance created and performed on site.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • DANC 239OC - Site Specific Dance

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Students will study the work of numerous artists working in the genre of site-specific dance and explore the wide variety of ways artists attend to place through the body and movement. Students will follow their interests – environmental, architectural, agricultural, historical, aesthetic – to drive their art-making. We will spend significant time at our sites of choice developing structures and movement vocabularies inspired by and responsive to each specific place. By resisting the temptation to make dances in the studio and transfer them to a site, students will learn how the essence of a place, discovered through sensory information, uniquely imbues dance created and performed on site. This course is part of the StudiOC learing community.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? Yes

  
  • DANC 240 - Arts Management I

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Students will be introduced to and develop an understanding of the critical areas that comprise Arts Management including; Organization Structure, Management Theory, Budgeting and Fiscal Theories, Marketing and Audience Development. They will also begin to develop the ability to understand and navigate the challenges of competing priorities in today’s world, specifically, reconciling aesthetic, managerial and economic considerations.
    This course is cross-listed with THEA 240


    Community Based Learning
  
  • DANC 242 - Musical Theater Dance

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    This intermediate-level studio course will give performers who are interested in musicals the opportunity to work on their jazz and ballet techniques. We will study Broadway musicals and choreographers, identifying and practicing the elements that make the choreography unique. Students will recreate and/or choreograph new musical theater numbers. Actors and singers with dance experience are encouraged to audition.
 

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