Jul 22, 2024  
Course Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Course Catalog 2022-2023 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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This is a comprehensive listing of all active, credit-bearing courses offered by Oberlin College and Conservatory since Fall 2016. Courses listed this online catalog may not be offered every semester; for up to date information on which courses are offered in a given semester, please see PRESTO. 

For the most part, courses offered by departments are offered within the principal division of the department. Many interdisciplinary departments and programs also offer courses within more than one division.

Individual courses may be counted simultaneously toward more than one General Course Requirement providing they carry the appropriate divisional attributes and/or designations.

 

Hispanic Studies

  
  • HISP 421 - Julio Cortázar’s Rayuela

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Julio Cortazar’s 1963 magnum opus, Rayuela , like Don Quixote and Ulysses, is a game-changer. It is an experimental hypertext, a love story, and a novel about being far from home and not wanting to grow up. Neruda said that anybody who didn’t read Cortazar was doomed. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 304 or equivalent
  
  • HISP 422 - Literature and Politics of Central America

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    This course presents cultural and literary responses to Central America’s neocolonial status since 1898, including the CIA-sponsored Guatemalan coup in 1954, the Nicaraguan Sandinista Movement in the 1980s, guerrilla war in El Salvador and Guatemala, post-war indigenous struggles, and the narco wars. Readings will include Asturias, Cardenal, Cortazar, Belli, Castellanos Moya, and Rigoberta Menchu and the controversy around the genre of the testimonio. Taught in English.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 426 - Latin American Literature and the Narrative of the Queer and the Perverse

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course offers a critical look at the narratives that helped define abnormal sexuality in Latin America.  We begin with Freud, Foucault, and Manuel Puig.  Then we read about criminalized sexuality in 20th c. Mexico; narratives by F.Hernández, Pizarnik, and Peri Rossi riffing off Freudian essays on fetishism and lesbianism; and the Latin trans experience, featured prominently in essayists, novelists (Donoso, Lemebel, R.Indiana Hernández, Cabezón Cámara), graphic novelists (G.Hernandez), contemporary anthropology, and documentaries.  Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or the equivalent.
    This course is cross-listed with GSFS 426


  
  • HISP 430 - Literature and Music of Heartbreak

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    There’s a Yiddish saying that there’s nothing more whole than a broken heart. Everyone experiences it, yet it’s singularly difficult to represent. We will explore heartbreak’s double-edge as a formal problem that is simultaneously existential. The seminar centers on close reading and active listening as complementary practices in many genres, while highlighting contemporary female-identified writers and composers. Works by Aridjis, Beyoncé, Bielawa, Blake, Borges, Cusk, Davis, García Márquez, Gulliksen, Ladin, Lispector, Lorca, Schubert & more. Taught in English.
    Prerequisites & Notes: By consent of instructor
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 430


  
  • HISP 441 - The Spanish Revolution, 80 Years Later

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    A 1936 military coup in Spain unleashed what some consider a civil waror the beginning of World War IIbut many prefer to call a revolution. With half of Spain controlled by the right-wing rebels, workers and peasants in the other half took over land and factories in what according one author came closer to realizing the ideal of the free stateless society on a vast scale than any other revolution in history. What happened? How has the story been told by historians, novelists, artists, politicians, and participants? What can the Spanish revolution teach us today? Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two Spanish-taught 300-Level Courses.
  
  • HISP 445 - Crime, Sex and Ghosts of the Past: Contemporary Spanish Fiction and Film

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Spain’s transition to democracy following Franco’s death in 1975 was characterized by two contradictory phenomena: a sudden moral, sexual, and political liberation, and a collective “pact of oblivion” that indefinitely postponed any reckoning with the dictatorial past. This course studies the film and fiction of post-Franco Spain, rife with sex and crime but also haunted by the ghosts of history. Includes works by Martín Gaite, Vázquez Montalban, Llamazares, Almodóvar, Medem, and Saura. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two Spanish taught 300- level courses.
  
  • HISP 447 - Luis Buñuel and His Legacy

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Three-and-a-half decades after his death, the work of Spanish-Mexican director Luis Buñuel (1900-1983), founder of surrealist cinema, remains as puzzling and disturbing as ever. Screening a large part of his filmography–including his lesser-known Mexican work–we will attempt to understand Buñuel as situated at the crossroads of major debates, movements, and tensions of twentieth-century cultural and political history: modernism, surrealism, and realism; communism, anti-communism, and the Popular Front; commerce, politics, and artistic integrity. We’ll also assess the legacy he left in Spanish, Mexican, Hollywood, and world cinema. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two 300-Level courses taught in Spanish beyond 304.
  
  • HISP 450 - Puerto Rico Post-Mortem: Nation, Identity, and Language in a Non-Sovereign Territory

    FC ARHU CD WINT
    4 credits
    What are nations? Do they matter? Is there such a thing as national identity? Can we do away with both? Asking these questions in Puerto Rico, a non-sovereign territory of the USA with an extensive diaspora, is different than in most contexts. Ideas of nationhood and identity, after all, structure historical claims for the islands independence and decolonization. This course engages with relevant debates in recent Puerto Rican intellectual history. Prior coursework related to Latin America/Latinx USA strongly recommended. Taught in English.
  
  • HISP 451 - Puerto Rico Post-Mortem: Nation, Identity, and Language in a Non-Sovereign Territory LxC

    HC ARHU CD
    2 credits
    This two-credit course, in Spanish, will expand and complement the discussions in HISP 450 by focusing on classic culturalist interpretations of Puerto Rican identity and the islands political conundrum from the 1930s to the 1990s. We will read texts by Antonio Pedreira, Isabelo Zen, JosLuis Gonzez, and Juan Flores, among others. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 455 - Women on the Move: Migrant Women’s Voices at the Mexican-U.S. American Border

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    Even though over half of all migrants to the United States are women, their experiences and contributions are usually not given much attention. This seminar seeks to bring these experiences to light, identify the reasons why women migrate to the United States, and examine the impacts of migration on their families and communities. We will also interrogate how current official discourses on migration create patterns for inclusion and exclusion. Topics will include migration trends, transnationalism, gendered violence, border imperialism, among others. Works by Rosario Sanmiguel, María Amparo Escandón, Reyna Grande, Yuri Herrera, and more. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HISP 304 or the equivalent.
  
  • HISP 456 - Minor Literature, World Literature, and the Limits of Translation

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    The theory of Minor Literature recognizes a paradox of minority self-expression: to be legible to dominant culture, writers must revolutionize its language. World Literature refers to books self-fashioned for translation in the Global North. Reading widely from historical regionalism to contemporary flash fiction, we consider to what extent the authentic is always a matter of translation. Works by Abreu, Arguedas, Arlt, Benavides, Gerchunoff, Kornberg, Shua, and more. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: 304 and another 300-level courses in HISP or equivalent.
  
  • HISP 458 - Borges to Cortázar: Fantasy and Violence in Argentine Literature 1930-1955

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    In an Argentina first of dictatorships and then of a populist autocrat, the middle-aged Borges and the young Cortar discover their radically new approaches to fantastic literature. Even authors who abhor violence in real life are drawn to lurid portraits of universal infamy, and genres as disparate as socialist painting, tango lyrics, womens autobiography, and anarchist theater are affected. We will also examine the writings associated with that Argentine magnet of fantasy and violence, Eva Per. Taught in Spanish.
  
  • HISP 460 - Repeating Islands: Literatures of the Caribbean

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    Cuban writer Antonio Benítez Rojo held that within the apparent historical, linguistic, and ethnic heterogeneity of the Caribbean, one could identify an “island that repeats itself”, a core experience which, despite being impossible to access, offers a series of indexes or tropes which bridge the Antilles with North and South America, India, Gambia, etcetera. Motivated by Benítez Rojo, this course engages with a series of Caribbean writers not only to offer a survey of the literature of the region, but also as an inquiry into the possibility or impossibility of a label such as “Caribbean literature”. We will read works by Alejo Carpentier, Mayra Santos Febres, Raquel Salas Rivera, Rita Indiana, VS Naipaul, Derek Walcott, Jamaica Kincaid, Edouard Glissant, Marie Vieux-Chauvet, Dionne Brandt, and Aimé Césaire. Taught in English.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two HISP 300-level courses or CMPL 200.
    This course is cross-listed with CMPL 460


  
  • HISP 461 - Wild Laboratories: Political Experiments in 19th Century Latin America

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    19th century Latin America was a politico-cultural laboratory. Within the future republics, myriads of political experiments sought to put into practice many of the Enlightenments hypotheses. Despite their outcomes, these experiments attest to the audacity of thought in an age characterized by equal measures of political innovation and political failure. A variety of materialsfrom speeches and legislation to historiography and essayswill inform our exploration of the discourses that constituted and continue to determine the Latin American republics. Taught in Spanish.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Two Spanish-taught 300-Level courses.
  
  • HISP 501 - Capstone

    HC ARHU CD WADV
    2 credits
    This course allows senior Hispanic Studies majors to expand the final project of a 400-level HISP seminar into a 15-20 page research paper (in Spanish) and a 15-minute oral presentation given at the end of the semester. Weekly 1.5-hour group meetings allow students to share their research and drafts with each other and the instructor. Required for HISP majors in their senior year who declared their major in Fall 2015 or later. More details are available at the HISP website.
  
  • HISP 505F - Honors - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Honors - Full
  
  • HISP 505H - Honors - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Honors course.
  
  • HISP 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC ARHU
    4 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.
  
  • HISP 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC ARHU
    2 credits
    Private readings are offered as either a half or full academic course and require the faculty member’s approval. Students who wish to pursue a topic not covered in the regular curriculum may register for a private reading. This one-to-one tutorial is normally at the advanced level in a specific field and is arranged with a member of the faculty who has agreed to supervise the student. Unlike other courses, a student cannot register for a private reading via PRESTO. To register for a private reading, obtain a card from the Registrar’s Office, complete the required information, obtain the faculty member’s approval for the reading, and return the card to the Registrar’s Office.

Historical Performance

  
  • HPRF 110 - Piano Music in Performance

    HC CNDP, DDHU
    2 credits
    We will explore issues of style and interpretation through the close examination of recordings, focusing especially on those made by composers or performers closely associated with them, and those that feature historical keyboard instruments. Examples will be drawn from music by Bartok, Rachmaninoff, Schumann, Chopin, Beethoven, Mozart, and Bach.
    Prerequisites & Notes: For keyboard division majors/minors. Consent required by instructor.
  
  • HPRF 111 - Historical Performance in Context: Music of France

    CNDP
    1 credit
    First of a projected set of four courses designed to introduce students to a wide range of styles. Each course focuses on the music of a different country and will include an overview of the significant repertoire as well as the historical context (art, politics, and society).
  
  • HPRF 112 - Historical Performance in Context: Music of England

    CNDP, DDHU
    1 credit
    One of a set of four courses designed to introduce students to a wide range of styles. Each course focuses on the music of a different country and will include an overview of the significant repertoire as well as the historical context (art, politics, and society).
    Prerequisites & Notes: Consent of instructor required.
  
  • HPRF 113 - Historical Performance in Context: Music of Italy

    CNDP
    1 credit
    One of a set of four courses designed to introduce students to a wide range of styles. Each course focuses on the music of a different country and will include an overview of the significant repertoire as well as the historical context (art, politics, and society). The course will be team-taught by members of the HP program and guests.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Consent of instructor required.
  
  • HPRF 114 - Historical Performance in Context: Music of Germany

    CC CNDP, DDHU
    1 credit
    One of a set of four courses designed to introduce students to a wide range of styles. Each course focuses on the music of a different country and will include an overview of the significant repertoire as well as the historical context (art, politics, and society). The course will be team-taught by members of the HP program and guests.Notes: Consent of the instructor required.
  
  • HPRF 121 - Performing Beethoven’s Violin Sonatas

    CNDP
    1 credit
    This course gives students the opportunity to play in a workshop setting with David Breitman at the fortepiano (pitch=A440). Each student will prepare a different movement each week (6 movements over the module). Prior experience with a period violin/bow is neither required nor expected; students may use their modern violin in this course. Differences between the modern and earlier violin will be touched on, however, and interested students may be able to borrow equipment,depending on availability.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Violin majors only (permission of the principal teacher required).
  
  • HPRF 122 - Performing Beethoven’s Cello Sonatas

    CNDP
    1 credit
    This course gives students the opportunity to play in a workshop setting with David Breitman at the fortepiano (pitch=A440). Each student will prepare a different movement each week (6 movements over the module). Prior experience with a period cello/bow is neither required nor expected; students may use their modern cello in this course. Differences between the modern and earlier cello will be touched on, however, and interested students may be able to borrow equipment,depending on availability.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Cello majors only (permission of the prinicpal teacher required).
  
  • HPRF 201 - Introduction to Historical Improvisation

    HC CNDP DDHU
    2 credits
    An introduction to historical improvisation and composition for players of all melodic instruments. Using historical techniques and methods (such as figured bass, diminutions, and partimento), students will learn how to improvise and ornament seventeenth- and eighteenth-century style music in a variety of forms. Students will learn to realize simple figured bass lines, with effective voice leading and dissonance control, on their own instruments. We will learn and internalize a collection of useful harmonic schemas using ground bass exercises. We will also learn the art of ornamentation. Gradually, we will combine these schemas to improvise and compose larger, more complex pieces such as preludes and dance movements.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MUTH 132 Music Theory II.
  
  • HPRF 302 - Introduction to Historical Performance

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    What does a score tell us? What does it not tell us? And what is expected of the performer? A study of changing performance styles in music from the 19th century to the Middle Ages. Topics include the evolution of instruments, ensembles, and orchestras; and conventions of rhythm, tempo, articulation, phrasing, and ornamentation. Students will compare editions and prepare an edition themselves.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MHST 101 and one 200-level Music History course are suggested. ESOL 130 or testing equivalent is required of International students.
    This course is cross-listed with MHST 302


  
  • HPRF 303 - Seminar in Performance Practice

    HC CNDP, DDHU
    2 credits
    For students specializing in Historical Performance. Close reading of historical treatises, and the application of precepts found in the treatises to actual performance, workshop-style, in class. This class is cross-referenced with HPRF 312 but with additional assignments for graduate students.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: HPRF 302/502 (or MHST 302).
  
  • HPRF 312B - Special Topics in Performance Practice

    CNDP
    1 credit
    Topic: Musical performance in the 20th century. A study of changing 20th century attitudes, tastes, and approaches to the performance of orchestral, vocal, chamber, and keyboard repertoires. Performing styles and traditionswill be xamined by listening to recordings of historical significance. Also covered will be the ‘Early Music’ revival and the critical issues central to t he ‘authenticity’ movement of the past 30 years.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: HPRF 302 (or MHST 302). Also see HPRF 512B. Note: May be repeated for credit if the topic changes. Consent of instructor required.
  
  • HPRF 502 - Introduction to Historical Performance

    FC CNDP, DDHU
    4 credits
    What does a score tell us? What does it not tell us? And what is expected of the performer? A study of changing performance styles in music from the 19th century to the Middle Ages. Topics include the evolution of instruments, ensembles, and orchestra; and conventions of rhythm, tempo, articulation, phrasing, and ornamentation. Students will compare editions and prepare an edition themselves.This course is cross-referenced with MHST 302.
    Prerequisites & Notes: MHST 101, and one 200-level Music History course, or consent of the instructor.
  
  • HPRF 503 - Seminar in Performance Pract

    HC CNDP, DDHU
    2 credits
    TBA
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course is cross-referenced with HPRF 303, but with additional assignments for graduate students.
  
  • HPRF 512B - Special Topics in Performance Practice

    CNDP, DDHU
    1 credit
    This course is cross-referenced with HPRF 312B but with additional assignments for graduate students.
    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: HPRF 302/502 or MHST 302. Consent of instructor required.
  
  • HPRF 521A - Graduate Studies Hist Perform

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    Graduate Studies Hist Perform
  
  • HPRF 521B - Graduate Studies Hist Perform

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    This course constitutes an extension to ‘Historical Performance in Context’ (HPRF 111, 112, 113, 114), which is to be taken concurrently. Students will undertake one or two independent research projects relating to the performance practice of national repertoires, to be designed in collaboration with their applied teacher. Two (2) hours of HPRF 521 will be required of each Historical Performance graduate student.
  
  • HPRF 995F - Private Reading - Full

    FC CNDP
    4 credits
    Private Reading - Full
  
  • HPRF 995H - Private Reading - Half

    HC CNDP
    2 credits
    Private Reading - Half

History

  
  • HIST 101 - Medieval and Early Modern European History

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    An introductory level survey course extending from the fall of Rome through the ‘modernization’ of medieval Europe during the 16th and 17th centuries. Topics will include: the political and religious order in the early Middle Ages, conflict between Church and Empire, the urbanization of Europe, the culture of the High Middle Ages, the growth of secular monarchies, the Black Death, the Italian Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation and the Scientific Revolution.
  
  • HIST 102 - Modern European History

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This introductory course surveys the histories of the peoples of Europe from the Old Regime to the present. Students are introduced to the methods of studying history as well as the subject matter proper. Particular topics include: the decline of the society of orders, the French Revolution and its aftershocks through the 19th century, liberalism, socialism, imperialism, fascism and the rise and fall of the Cold War.
  
  • HIST 103 - American History to 1877

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Gives attention to inter alia, pre-contact Indian civilizations and contact; patterns of colonization; politics, religion, and society in British mainland colonies; other European settlements; development of Western Hemisphere slavery; the struggle among European powers for North American supremacy; causes, ideology, events, and implications of the American Revolution; the rise of political tension in the early republic; growth of parties, industrialization, and abolitionism; sectional conflict, and the crisis of union and reconstruction.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • HIST 104 - American History 1877-Present

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course will explore American politics, society, and culture from the post-Civil War era to the present. We will focus on changes in power relations in American society produced by social and political movements. We will also examine the construction and contestation of gender, race, ethnic, and class. This course will emphasize the use of primary sources, different modes of historical analysis and interpretation, and scholarly controversies.
  
  • HIST 105 - Chinese Civilization

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    An introduction to the history of China from the archaeological origins of Chinese civilization to the period of the mature imperial state in the 17th century. The diverse origins of China’s civilization are stressed as topics in political, social, and economic history are explored, as well as developments in religion and thought, language and literature, and art. This course is the normal introduction to further study of Chinese history and culture and, in particular, provides a valuable context for themes treated in Modern China.
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 121


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • HIST 106 - Modern China

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This history of China from the founding of the Manchu Qing (Ch’ing) dynasty in 1644 takes a China-centered perspective. Along with political and institutional developments, long-term changes in the society and economy of China are stressed and the indigenous bases for those changes are explored so that China’s 20th century revolutionary upheaval will be seen to be more than a ‘response to the Western impact’ or an ‘emergence into modernity.’
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 122


  
  • HIST 107 - Russian History I

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    An introductory survey of Russian history from the earliest times to the mid-19th c. Beginning with an overview of the Kievan Rus and the Mongol overlordship, we will explore the diverse influences of the steppe, Orthodox Christianity, and `the west’ on the nature of the Muscovite and Imperial Russian state, the relationship between state and society, the formation of national and imperial identities, and dominant cultural values.
    This course is cross-listed with REES 107


  
  • HIST 108 - Russian History II

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Beginning with the reform era in mid-19th century, this course examines the processes that led to the revolutions of 1917 and the consolidation of Soviet power; the formation and nature of the Stalinist system; the Soviet experience of World War II and the origins of the Cold War; post-Stalin efforts at reform and factors which led to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991; the course ends with a brief consideration of the Yeltsin and Putin regimes.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • HIST 109 - Latin American History: Invasion to Independence

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    An introductory survey of Latin American history centering on the experiences of those marginalized by colonial rule such as people of indigenous and African descent, women, queer figures, and religious minorities. Emphasis is placed on the Spanish and Portuguese Empires not as institutions, but as a series of uneven encounters and extractive arrangements that drew the Americas into global economic and social processes. Key themes we will study include the creation and manipulation of human difference, individual and group resistance to imperial rule and oppression, the challenges to empire posed by scale and environment, and the complex and vibrant communities formed in Latin America between 1492 and the 1820s.
  
  • HIST 110 - Latin American History: State and Nation Since Independence

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This introductory course examines the political, social, and, and economic trajectories of Latin American countries since the nineteenth-century wars of independence. From the conflicts of early nation-building to the long-lasting effects of dictatorships and social movements, this course attends to important, and on-going, questions of identity, race, gender, and justice in Latin America. More than looking at Latin America in isolation, this course explores the interventions and exchanges with global economies, politics, and culture.
  
  • HIST 117 - Modern Chinese History, 1600-present

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course covers the most recent 400+ years of China’s 4,000+ year history, from the late Ming and Qing dynasties to the Nationalist and Communist republics. Broadly speaking, this is a period marked by China’s steep decline and equally sharp rise. China in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was at the height of its imperial power, but by the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries its very existence was in doubt. Now China’s fortunes have changed again, with the nation poised for superpower status on the one hand, while also facing considerable domestic and international challenges on the other. We will trace the many twists and turns of this path, learning how China struggled to survive foreign invasions and severe domestic rebellions, as well as bouts of ideological extremism and intense cultural critique, to emerge where it is today. 
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 117


  
  • HIST 121 - History of the Middle East and North Africa, from the Rise of Islam to 1800

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This introductory course surveys the history of Islamic states, societies and cultures from the formation of Islam to the beginnings of the Ottoman Empire. The course moves between primary texts and secondary readings to cover topics including: the life of Prophet Muhammad; Quran, Hadith and Shari`a; religious and political sectarianism and rebellion; Sunni and Shi`i governments; Islamic philosophy, sciences, and literature; Muslim women; religious minorities; and encounters between Muslims and the West.
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • HIST 122 - MENA History from 1800 to the Present

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This introductory course follows the intellectual, political, economic and social transformations in the region from 1800 to the present. It examines themes including the relation between the British and French colonizers and their colonized societies, the formation of modern ‘nation-states,’ national identities and wars of liberation, Arab nationalism and socialism, ethnic and sectarian conflicts, the Arab Israeli conflict; Gulf politics and economy, feminist thought and activism, and the emergence of political Islam.
  
  • HIST 129 - History of Rome

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Gladiators! Decadence! Empire! This course will survey the history of Rome, from its prehistoric origins to the collapse of the Western Empire in the fifth century CE. We will pay close attention to networks of social power, the impact of imperialism, and the unity and diversity of what it meant to be `Roman’. The course will engage with military history, slavery, the rise of Christianity, ndigenous or `pagan’ religious practices, and resistance. Readings from the ancient sources will provide the basis for discussions.
    This course is cross-listed with CLAS 104


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • HIST 130 - History of Greece

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Greece has been associated with the birth of Democracy, the stand of the 300 Spartans, and the conquests of Alexander the Great. This course surveys the history of the Greek speaking world from the Prehistoric period to the death of Cleopatra. Special attention will be paid to ancient documents, art, and architecture. In addition to military and political developments, the course will also analyze the Greek world through the eyes of women, slaves, and foreigners.
    This course is cross-listed with CLAS 103


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • HIST 159 - Japan: Earliest Times to 1868

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course examines the origins of Japanese civilization and surveys the classical, medieval, and early modern periods. From the emergence of a court-centered state through the rise and fall of a warrior-dominated society, Japan’s pre-modern history is explored by focusing on political, social, cultural, and intellectual developments. Early interactions with Asia and the West will be considered as a means of questioning the “opening” of Japan in the mid-nineteenth century.
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 131


  
  • HIST 160 - Modern Japan

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course surveys Japan’s modern transformation from the Meiji Restoration of 1868 to the present. It examines how political, social, and economic modernization were simultaneous projects while considering their impact on the lives of citizens at home and imperial subjects abroad. We focus on how economic volatility, popular struggles for representative democracy, war, and colonization represent aspects of Japan’s twentieth century experience as well as widely shared dilemmas of modernity.
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 132


  
  • HIST 162 - Cultures and Peoples of Ancient India

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course surveys South Asian history from the earliest times to the eve of European conquest (c. 2500 BCE - 1750 CE). It explores the foundations of classical Hindu culture, the expansion of Muslim empires, and the evolution of Indian political traditions. Special attention is paid to the making of religious, ethnic, and linguistic identities, the growth of agrarian and urban societies, environmental and economic transformations, and regional exchanges with the wider world.
  
  • HIST 163 - Modern South Asia

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course surveys the making of modern South Asia from the British Empire to the birth of the nation-states of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh (c. 1750 to present). It introduces students to such key themes in South Asian history as the impact of European rule, the rise of anticolonial movements, and the problems of postcolonial politics. Topics of inquiry the English East India Company and the British Raj, social reform and social revolt, mass nationalism and Hindu-Muslim ‘communalism,’ and the aspirations and failures of democratic governance.
  
  • HIST 181 - Korea and East Asia: From Ancient Times to the Present

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course is designed to introduce students to a broad survey of Korea’s history, both ancient and modern. It will examine various interpretive approaches to the political, social, cultural, and diplomatic history of Korea. We will also investigate contemporary nationalist theories of Korean development, including Japanese imperial legacies of colonial conquest, and how they have informed Koreans’ view of their ancient past as well as influenced current debates about the two Koreas’ reunified future.
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 163


    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • HIST 204 - From Gold to Guacamole: Latin American Commodity History

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course studies the histories of colonial and modern Latin America through its commodities. Students will learn about the place of the region in the development of capitalism and world systems and analyze Latin American history through commodity chain and dependency theories. Tools and perspectives on commodities from social, environmental, cultural, and Atlantic history frameworks will complement economic history. Assignments in this course help students to build skills in historical analysis and critical thinking as we consider the construction of the present: documentary analysis, historical and historiographical argumentation, and writing using and citing primary and secondary sources.
    Does this course require off campus field trips? No

  
  • HIST 205 - Heavenly Histories: The Making of Western Cosmology from Antiquity to the Trial of Galileo

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This class examines the history of western cosmology or the study of the origin and development of the universe. We move from the ancient world of Plato and Ptolemy to Renaissance Europe while studying the historical interplay between science, philosophy, and religion. We will consider how human understanding of the universe and our place within it has changed over time and ask how society informs science and vice versa. Students will build expertise in primary source analysis, critical thinking, and writing while reading major texts by Aristotle, St. Augustine, Dante, Kepler, and Galileo among others.
  
  • HIST 207 - Cinema, Memory, and Politics in Egypt

    FC SSCI CD WINT
    4 credits
    Arab cinema often narrates historical memories of a great civilization that went through glorious and hard times over long centuries. The oldest and most popular film industry in the Middle East, Egyptian cinema, adopts epic stories from the region’s ancient, biblical, Islamic, colonial, nationalist, or recent past through various ideological lenses and for different political aims. Watching a selection of Egyptian films (with English subtitles), this course examines how Arab movies constantly remember, construct, and display the region’s eventful past. Students enrolled in this course are eligible to participate in an International Winter Term course in Egypt in January 2023.
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course is a part of StudiOC learning community, along with ARBC 101, titled “Arab & Islamic Historical Memory: Cinema, Language, and Museums.”
  
  • HIST 207OC - Cinema, Memory, and Politics in Egypt

    FC SSCI CD WINT
    4 credits
    Arab cinema often narrates historical memories of a great civilization that went through glorious and hard times over long centuries. The oldest and most popular film industry in the Middle East, Egyptian cinema, adopts epic stories from the region’s ancient, biblical, Islamic, colonial, nationalist, or recent past through various ideological lenses and for different political aims. Watching a selection of Egyptian films (with English subtitles), this course examines how Arab movies constantly remember, construct, and display the region’s eventful past. Students enrolled in this course are eligible to participate in an International Winter Term course in Egypt in January 2023.
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course is a part of StudiOC learning community, along with ARABIC 101, titled “Arab & Islamic Historical Memory: Cinema, Language, and Museums
  
  • HIST 208 - Of Miracles and Microscopes: A History of Science from 1200-1800

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    By most accounts, the 16th century ushered in the Scientific Revolution-an age of reason that replaced one of credulous belief in spells and miraculous transformations. This class evaluates such claims and positions scientific methods and discoveries within the social, economic, cultural, and religious contexts in which they were produced. Alchemy, magic, and witchcraft as well as inductive reasoning and technologies of observation will all play a part in the constitution of new disciplines and truths.
  
  • HIST 209 - The City in Europe, 1100-1789

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    The medieval city–birthplace of political freedom or site of repression? Cultural haven or den of iniquity? This course explores the role of cities in the creation of Europe from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution; it draws on both sociological theories of urbanization and historical accounts of lived experience. We examine medieval origins, commercial capitalism and craft production, Renaissance urbanism and space, the civilizing process, political reform, and the nature of popular protest.
  
  • HIST 214 - Oberlin Oral History: Community-Based Learning & Research Practicum

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    Learning the history of a place as recounted by members of a community helps us understand and act in the present. This course introduces students to community-based learning & research, with a focus on oral history. Students will learn from members of the Oberlin community and establish historical context and methodological familiarity through readings and visits to local organizations. Oral history methods will be applied through interviews in partnership with Oberlin Heritage Center’s ‘Oberlin Oral History Project.’ Students will also conduct archival research and produce a digital humanities exhibit. Field Trips required.
    Community Based Learning
  
  • HIST 216 - European Socialisms and Post-Socialisms

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    The writings of Karl Marx inspired generations of Europeans to construct a society free from the scourges of capitalism. This course will examine the attempts to realize socialism ranging from Parisian communards in the 1870s to Eastern European bureaucrats in the 1970s. We will also explore how post-socialist societies and economies dealt with the legacies of socialism.
  
  • HIST 218 - The American Revolution

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    An exploration of the United States’ founding era, from the end of the Seven Years’ War in 1763 to the “Republican Revolution” of 1800.  “Thirteen clocks had been made to strike together,” John Adams once recalled of the War for American Independence, “a perfection of mechanism, which no artist had ever before effected.”  This course interrogates Adams’ consensus-driven interpretation of the Revolution by assessing the causes and effects of independence in American social and political life.  Our investigation into the meaning of independence for diverse Americans will ultimately help us address a longstanding historiographical problem: How revolutionary was the American Revolution?   
    This course is appropriate for new students.
  
  • HIST 220 - Latinx Solidarities in United States Social and Cultural Movements

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    In this course, we examine the history of political and cultural collaboration, exchange, and tension between Latinxs and other racial and ethnic groups in the United States. What challenges and opportunities arise when Latinxs work, organize, and create alongside other groups that have been systematically disenfranchised? We will interrogate the meaning of solidarity as we consider historical and contemporary social and cultural movements in locations such as Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York City
  
  • HIST 222 - Modern Germany and Eastern Europe, 1848-1989

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    How should a community constitute itself politically? What does it mean to be a citizen? What is the relationship between the state and the nation? These questions were at issue throughout modern Central European history. We will examine the various answers offered to this question over this period: from nationalists to social democrats to Nazis and Communists. To contextualize these issues further, we will integrate theories of nationality, ethnicity, and identity into our empirical readings.
  
  • HIST 226 - WW II

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    A comparative overview of how World War II transformed nations, groups, and individuals. This course endeavors to pay equal attention to the two regional wars in Asia and in Europe that joined to become ‘World War II’ only in 1941. Particular topics include: conventional military, political, and diplomatic history; the ‘totalization’ of war as it became global; gender and the cultural history of military experience.
  
  • HIST 227 - The History and Practice of Whiteness in the United States

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This course explores the creation of white racial identity in the 18th century, its evolution since its invention, and the policing and privileging of whiteness over the course of U.S. history. Themes include the role of law and science in defining white racial identity; how immigrants and other groups have sought to ‘become white’ or have challenged the boundaries of whiteness; and how the state has granted economic and political privilege to those deemed white.
  
  • HIST 230 - Jewish Communities of the Ottoman Empire, 1453-1914

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course focuses on Jewish communities of the Near East and North Africa from the conquest of Constantinople to World War I. It examines the experiences of Jews as one of many minorities, with special attention to the permeability of social boundaries within a multiethnic, multi-religious, and multicultural empire. Emphasis will be placed on the history of Jewish-Muslim relations, specifically in contrast to the experiences of Jewish communities within Christendom.
    This course is cross-listed with JWST 281


  
  • HIST 232 - History of Race in American Cities and Suburbs

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course explores the social and cultural history of American cities and suburbs as sites of ethnic formation and community and interracial and interethnic contestation/struggle, with a focus on major developments and examples from the twentieth century. Case studies on urban unrest, the rise of ‘ethnoburbs,’ gentrification, and other topics will illuminate distinct histories and places, while weaving together a broad understanding of how urban change, suburbanization, migration, economic restructuring, and political organizing have transformed American life and the experiences of racial and ethnic minorities.
    This course is cross-listed with CAST 232


  
  • HIST 233 - The Long War in Modern China

    FC ARHU CD WADV
    4 credits
    This course explores the ways in which warfare shaped China as a modern nation-state that we know today; it examines a variety of military and ideological conflicts - including the Opium War, Taiping Rebellion, Sino-Japanese Wars, Chinese Civil War, and the Korean War - between individuals, peoples, organizations, empires, and nation-states from the 19th century to the present. In addition, this course investigates people’s life experiences, such as suffering, displacement, and death during wartime. It also pays attention to how warfare shaped gender concepts, environment and ecology, popular culture, and everydayness.
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 233


  
  • HIST 234 - Bandits, Terrorists, Partisans: Non-State Political Violence in Modern Europe

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    States are bodies that claim a monopoly on the legitimate use of force in a given territory - bodies that successfully wield the apparatuses of the courts, the army, the police. But how are we to understand historical groups that have sought to operate outside of this monopoly, or even challenge it? This class is a study of bandits, terrorists, and partisans in the European past. Through primary sources, political texts, literary works, and films, we will explore the histories of irregular political violences and the actors who have wielded them. Together, we will find that these counter-histories of rebels, vigilantes, and insurgents raise important questions regarding the relationship between history, violence, and the political itself. 
  
  • HIST 236 - Orientalism and the Jewish Question

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Orientalist discourses of the European age of imperialism were about Jews as well as Muslims. This course examines how Orientalism was intertwined with the Jewish Question in Western Europe and how European Jews responded to Christian characterizations of them as ?Asiatic others.? Running the gamut from outright rejection to the embrace of a romanticized, Eastern aesthetic, their reactions have much to tell us about the complexities of modern Jewish identity. Primary source materials include works of literature, philosophy, and architecture as well as representations of Jewishness in the Arts. Field trip required
    This course is cross-listed with JWST 236


  
  • HIST 238 - Slavery in the US

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course will chart the history of chattel slavery in the United States and the manner in which the institution took shape from the colonial period to the end of the American Civil War. Students will study the legal, cultural, political, and social developments that profoundly shaped the experiences of people of African descent in the US. This course is a focused study of racial slavery and the historical underpinnings of the racial ideologies that shaped everyday life in mainland North America. Therefore, this course involves an intensive reading of the historical scholarship on slavery, careful examination of relevant primary sources, class discussions, and a series of focused assignments.
    Prerequisites & Notes: HIST 103
  
  • HIST 244 - The U.S. in World War II

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    World War II is perhaps the most important event in twentieth-century American history. The war had a profound effect on American society, the economy, and America’s global status. This course examines the ways in which WWII influenced and transformed America through a study of military, social, cultural, and political history. Topics include the combat experience; politics and technological developments; the war’s impact on gender, race, and sexual relations; propaganda and censorship; and popular culture.
  
  • HIST 247OC - Cinema, Social Movements and Revolution in Egypt

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    What is the role of cinema in revolution? This course explores how cinema has contributed to social movements and mass uprisings in Egypt’s recent history. Cairo’s prolific film industry has mirrored political, socio-economic, urban & cultural transformations in the country. It has integrally participated in shaping radical ideologies & revolutionary activism. Informed by Postcolonial and Social Movement theories, this course investigates Egyptian cinema and resistance against colonial capitalism; Western imperialism; gender structures; queer repression; security state; neoliberalism; fundamentalist Islamism; oppressed sports-from the 1950s until the 2011; youth uprisings. Assignments include weekly films, film critiques, and a final research paper.
    Prerequisites & Notes: This course is a required course in the Learning Community entitled From Bombay to Cairo: Cinema and Social Change.
  
  • HIST 249 - Postwar Japan through Music and Film

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course examines Japan’s postwar period (1945-2011) through the lens of popular music and film, including documentary film. From the reconstruction of the nation after defeat in 1945 into a post-imperial age marked by affluence and a national ethic of egalitarianism, through to the collapse of the financial bubble of the 1980s and subsequent ‘lost decades’ of the 1990s and 2000s, this course maps how music and film responded to and shaped the course of postwar Japanese history. Specific themes include: politics of space and sound; globalization of popular music, war memory, anti-U.S. military movement in Okinawa, and anti-nuclear movement after Fukushima.
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 248


  
  • HIST 251 - U.S. Foreign Policy

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This course will examine the development and practice of American foreign policy from the 18th to the 21st century. The class will pay particular attention to the ethical and ideological considerations propelling both architects of U.S. foreign policy and critics of those policies. We will examine the evolution of the United States into the leading world power, the use and abuse of state power, the motivation behind wars, and the role of culture, politics, race, and gender in shaping U.S. foreign policy decisions.
  
  • HIST 256 - Immigration in U.S. History

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    History of immigration and migration in the United States, from nineteenth to early twenty-first centuries. Includes international context of migration, migrants encounters with American society, policy responses, and significance of immigration in American culture. Also covers internal migrations such as the “Great Migration” of blacks from the South. Aim is to provide introduction to major developments in history of U.S. im/migration, historicize contemporary debates, and develop comparative understanding of experiences among Asians, Blacks, Europeans, Latinos.  Field trips required.
    This course is cross-listed with CAST 256


  
  • HIST 260 - Asian American History

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the history of peoples of Asian ancestry in the United States and the construction of an Asian American collectivity. Major themes will include the place of Asian Americans in the American imagination, migrations, labor, communities, and responses to social and legal discrimination. The categories of race, ethnicity, gender, class and sexuality will figure prominently as we explore similarities and differences among Asian American experiences.
    This course is cross-listed with CAST 260


  
  • HIST 261 - On the Edges of China

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    Modern China’s culture and politics are shaped by its relations to border areas and beyond, and vice versa. This course explores the modern histories of the places where China meets Central, South, Northeast, and Southeast Asia. We will revisit the conception of the modern Chinese nation-state by placing places such as Xinjiang, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Manchuria at the center of discussion. Topics include environment, war legacy, ethnicity, colonialism, nation-building, and societal transformation.  
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 261


  
  • HIST 262 - Muslim Political Thought: From 600s to the Present

    FC SSCI CD WINT
    4 credits
    This course traces the evolution of the Muslim political thought, from views on Prophet Muhammad’s state in Medina to ideologies of Islamic governments and political parties today. It investigates the idea of the Caliphate in Sunni political theories, distressed visions on abolishing the last caliphate in the early 20th  century, and recent attempts to restore it by militant movements. Similarly, it examines the notion of the Imamate in Shi’i theories and the textual basis of Iran’s Islamic Republic. It scrutinizes treatises on the political economy of struggling sultans, secret orders of Assassins, rights of religious minorities under conquering caliphs, and women’s role in war. As Islamist political parties sweep or lose democratic elections in many Muslim countries today, the course examines their online media. Finally, the course explores how classical ideas influence the popular culture in Muslim and non-Muslim communities today, as reflected in TV’s soap operas about exoticized or vilified Ottoman courts, online Fatwas about women’s political rights, or even video games on medieval assassins.
  
  • HIST 265 - Sacred and Secular in an Islamic Republic: Pakistan

    FC SSCI CD WADV
    4 credits
    What is the relationship between Islam and secularism? From anticolonial struggles against British imperialism in India, Pakistan emerged in 1947 as a “Muslim homeland.” It has since witnessed military dictatorships, international armed conflicts, and a civil war. Its religious politics has also generated a series of paradoxes. Pakistan is today a republic with a state religion, it has blended capitalism with Islamist authoritarianism, and it has seen terrorism jostle against vibrant leftist politics. This course explores how Pakistanis have debated the sacred and the secular - religion and politics - from colonial times to the present, using textual, visual, and aural sources.
  
  • HIST 268 - Incarceration in the Modern MENA

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This lecture course examines the social history of incarceration in the Middle East and North Africa from the late nineteenth century to today. We will consider how carceral institutions have been central to governance and everyday life under colonial rule, independent governments, and military occupation. Adopting a broad definition of incarceration, we will explore institutions like prisons, refugee camps, orphanages, police forces, and conscription armies, and how those institutions have criminalized communities and shaped social movements.
  
  • HIST 270 - Latina/o History

    FC SSCI WINT
    4 credits
    What historical forces have brought together diverse groups including Chicanos from Los Angeles, Cubans from Miami, and Dominicans and Puerto Ricans from New York City? From the 16th century to the present, we map the varied terrains of Latina/o history. Major themes include: conquest and resistance, immigration, work, and the creation of racial and sexual differences within and between Latino/a communities. We survey Latina/o writers from Cabeza de Vaca to Jose Marti to Gloria Anzaldua.
    This course is cross-listed with CAST 270


  
  • HIST 274 - History of the Holocaust

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    This course explores the historical contingencies that resulted in the murder of two out of three European Jews between 1933 and 1945. Geographically, it will focus on both Germany, where the Final Solution originated, and Eastern Europe, where most of its victims lived and died. We will look at the failure of German democracy, the rise and consolidation of the National Socialist state, and the centrality of antisemitism within Nazi ideology. We will also examine Jewish and non-Jewish experiences of persecution, resistance, and flight as well as survival and destruction within the camp systems.
    This course is cross-listed with JWST 274


  
  • HIST 276 - Slavery in Latin America

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    The course offers a survey of the history of enslavement in Latin America. For more than 300 years, European colonizers exploited Indigenous people and people of African descent through slavery and other coercive labor systems, such as mita/encomienda and repartimiento. Slavery and coerced labor had long-lasting effects on the family, political organization, and cultural practices. It also generated tremendous wealth and cultivated prestige for colonizers and European monarchs. However, resistance movements fought against Spanish and Portuguese oppression and enslaved people escaped, formed their own communities, or disrupted economies to establish their agency in the colonial order.
  
  • HIST 278 - The Productive Past: Innovation and the Early Modern World

    FC SSCI CD WINT
    4 credits
    Innovations do not occur in a vacuum, or spring fully-born from the mind of an isolated genius–they also are intimately embedded in the social, cultural, and biological contexts that produce them. This course examines the theories and practice of change through case studies from the early modern period (15 -18 centuries): important innovations in economic, scientific and medical epistemologies that shape our current views of knowledge, our bodies, and what we put into them. Using historical evidence as well as hands-on workshops, students will study the complexity of innovation, particularly the real world stickiness of the problems they purported to address and the consequences of their adoption.
  
  • HIST 280 - Brothers at War: The Unending Korean War

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course is designed to explore the cultural, social, and political history of the Korean War in the context of Cold War ideology and U.S.-Soviet-Chinese-Korean relations as well as specific battles and key players.
    This course is cross-listed with EAST 280


  
  • HIST 281 - Ethnicity and Nation

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    While often seen as a long-unified state and culture, this course explores China as a diverse and multiethnic society shaped by tensions between the hegemonic drive of the state’s nation building and the multiplicity of human experiences, histories and ideological and social realities. Topics include Turkic and Muslim populations; Tibet’s historic relation to China; the spread of Han population and cultural practices into ‘minority areas’; and transnational connections with Southeast and Central Asia.
  
  • HIST 282 - The French Empire: 18th Century to the Present

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    The history of the French Empire is Caribbean history, North American history, the history of North Africa and the Middle East, West African history, Southeast Asian history, South Pacific islands history, and more, as well as the history of France. From the plantation colonialism of the 18th century to the remnants of empire that ring the globe today, French imperialism was always a unique combination of ‘piety, pugnacity, and greed,’ as much the making of missionaries and fantasy-oriented soldiers as capitalists. Combination of lecture and discussion. French language readings available for students with appropriate proficiency.
  
  • HIST 285 - American Indians: Pre-Columbus to the Present

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This survey course examines the indigenous cultures of North America from the ‘pre-contact’ period through the late twentieth century. It explores such salient themes as native encounters with European and African foreigners, pan-Indian movements and the development of race, the emergence of reservation life, the Indian New Deal, the termination of reservations and urban relocation. The course will also consider the bearing of the past on contemporary issues regarding native sovereignty and self-determination.
  
  • HIST 288 - Weimar Berlin

    FC SSCI
    4 credits
    The German city of Berlin has long been a city of fascination and transformation. During the short years between WWI and the Nazi takeover, it was the center of a cultural efflorescence that has rarely been matched since, including the music of Kurt Weill, the art of Dada and Neue Sachlichkeit, and the designs of the Bauhaus, among others. This course will examine the culture of Weimar Berlin and situate it within the turbulent social life and politics of those years. Required course for the From Berlin to Broadway: The Music of Kurt Weill StudiOC Learning Community.  
  
  • HIST 289 - Japanese American Internment and Public History

    HC SSCI
    2 credits
    This module course will focus on the history and legacies of Japanese internment during WWII with special attention paid to Oberlin’s response to internment. Taught in conjunction with a major public history exhibit about Japanese American students who attended Oberlin during the war, the class will include numerous lectures by outside speakers as well as the opportunity to learn about public history and to do outreach and education associated with the exhibit. Class will meet on Thursday evenings with occasional additional meetings on Fridays at noon to talk with outside speakers.
    This course is cross-listed with CAST 289


  
  • HIST 291 - Anti-Semitism in European History and Literature

    FC SSCI CD
    4 credits
    This course examines the origins, functions, and expressions of European anti-Jewish thought from early Christianity to the postwar period. Beginning with ancient intercultural conflicts, it then explores early Christian religious competition, medieval Judeophobia, and modern racial anti-Semitism. Students are expected to gain an understanding of the structures and outcomes of specifically anti-Jewish prejudice as well as to make connections with the historical oppression of other minority groups.
    This course is cross-listed with JWST 291


  
  • HIST 292 - Jewish Emancipation in Modern Europe

    FC ARHU CD
    4 credits
    This course examines the historical processes of Jewish civic emancipation in Europe during the 18th and 19th centuries. It explores the different paths taken in Britain, Western Europe, and Central Europe as they reflected varying discourses on the place of Jews within the modern nation-state. Topics include enlightenment, intellectual debate, revolution, reform, and antisemitic opposition.
    This course is cross-listed with JWST 292


  
  • HIST 299 - Introduction to Historical Methods

    FC SSCI WADV
    4 credits
    This course, required of all new History Majors beginning in Fall 2017, is designed to introduce history majors to a range of problems, debates and critical practices in the discipline of history. The class will examine different schools of historical thought, will explore the idea of the archive and examine many different kinds of sources for historical research, will consider methods and models of constructing historical interpretations, and will investigate ethical issues related to historical research and writing. History majors should aim to take History 299 in the spring of their sophomore year or the fall of their junior year.
  
  • HIST 301 - The Politics of Gender in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

    FC SSCI CD WADV
    4 credits
    This seminar examines European women’s history from the twelfth to the eighteenth century. By situating their lives within evolving social, economic, political and religious structures, we consider how women have acted individually and collectively, as agents of change and defenders of tradition, and how changing notions of gender have shaped communities, individuals and institutions. Topics include mysticism and sainthood, family and marriage, household production, witchcraft and scientific enquiry. Students will become familiar with historiographical debates about women and gender and complete individual research projects.
 

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